Music, Politics, Chaos, Counterculture, and the Shaping of a Generation

Author: Charles Kaiser

Publisher: Grove/Atlantic, Inc.

ISBN: 0802193242

Category: History

Page: 336

View: 8067

From assassinations to student riots, this is “a splendidly evocative account of a historic year—a year of tumult, of trauma, and of tragedy” (Arthur Schlesinger Jr.). In the United States, the 1960s were a period of unprecedented change and upheaval—but the year 1968 in particular stands out as a dramatic turning point. Americans witnessed the Tet offensive in Vietnam; the shocking assassinations of Martin Luther King Jr. and Robert Kennedy; and the chaos at the Democratic National Convention in Chicago. At the same time, a young generation was questioning authority like never before—and popular culture, especially music, was being revolutionized. Largely based on unpublished interviews and documents—including in-depth conversations with Eugene McCarthy and Bob Dylan, among many others, and the late Theodore White’s archives, to which the author had sole access—1968 in America is a fascinating social history, and the definitive study of a year when nothing could be taken for granted. “Kaiser aims to convey not only what happened during the period but what it felt like at the time. Affecting touches bring back powerful memories, including strong accounts of the impact of the Tet offensive and of the frenzy aroused by Bobby Kennedy’s race for the presidency.” —The New York Times Book Review
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Revisiting 1968 in America

Author: Jules Witcover

Publisher: Grand Central Publishing

ISBN: 9780446674713

Category: History

Page: 512

View: 9003

The assassination of Kennedy & Luther King, the Tet offensive in Vietnam, campus riots & the election of Nixon. The year is 1968 & for millions of Americans the dream of a nation facing up to basic problems at home & abroad were shattered.
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A Thesis, 1963-2008

Author: Leslie Herzberger

Publisher: Xlibris Corporation

ISBN: 146910010X

Category: Reference

Page: 190

View: 6696

Thermidor is just another way of saying Inquisition. At a point in time, the structure is in trouble. You either fix the structure, or you start shooting the people in the life of a complex group called a society. The shooting of people in a complex group, randomly constituted on account of the structure is what we call an Inquisition.
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Author: Mark Kurlansky

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9783453600393

Category: History, Modern

Page: 460

View: 7208

Tet-Offensive in Vietnam, Antikriegsbewegung, Prager Frühling, Rassenunruhen in Amerika und Notstandsgesetze in Deutschland, Pariser Mai und Demonstrationen polnischer und italienischer, mexikanischer und japanischer Studenten. Abbie Hoffman in New York,
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TV in an Era of Change, 1968-1978

Author: Josh Ozersky

Publisher: SIU Press

ISBN: 9780809325078

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 194

View: 4422

Archie Bunker’s America discerns what was "in the air” as television networks tried to accommodate cultural and political swings in America from the Vietnam era through the late 1970s. Josh Ozersky’s spirited examination of the ways America changed television during a period of intense social upheaval, recuperation, and fragmentation uncovers a bold and beguiling facet of American cultural history. From the conflict-based comedy of All in the Family and such post-sixties frolics as Three’s Company to tendentiously apolitical programs like Happy Days, Ozersky describes the range and power of television to echo larger schemes of American life. Around 1968, advertisers who were anxious to break into the lucrative baby-boomer demographic convinced television networks to begin to abandon prime-time programming that catered to universal audiences. With the market splintering, networks ventured into more issue-based and controversial territories. While early network attempts at more "relevant” programming failed, Ozersky examines how CBS struck gold with the political comedy All in the Family in 1971 and how other successful, conflict-based comedies turned away from typical show business conventions. As the 1970s wore on, the innovations of the previous years began to lose their public appeal. After Vietnam and Watergate, Ozersky argues, Americans were exhausted from the political turbulence of the preceding decade and were ready for a televisual "return to normalcy.” Straightforward, engaging, and liberally illustrated, Archie Bunker’s America is peppered with the stories of outsider cops and failed variety shows, of a young Bill Murray and an old Ed Sullivan, of Mary Tyler Moore, Fonzie, and the Skipper, too. Drawing on interviews with television insiders, trade publications, and the programs themselves, Ozersky chronicles the ongoing attempts of prime-time television to program for a fragmented audience--an audience whose greatest common denominator, by 1978, may well have been the act of watching television itself. The book also includes a foreword by renowned media critic Mark Crispin Miller and an epilogue of related commentary on the following decades.
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Law, Politics, and Ideology in New York, 1920-1980

Author: William E. Nelson

Publisher: Univ of North Carolina Press

ISBN: 0807875562

Category: Law

Page: 472

View: 593

Based on a detailed examination of New York case law, this pathbreaking book shows how law, politics, and ideology in the state changed in tandem between 1920 and 1980. Early twentieth-century New York was the scene of intense struggle between white, Anglo-Saxon, Protestant upper and middle classes located primarily in the upstate region and the impoverished, mainly Jewish and Roman Catholic, immigrant underclass centered in New York City. Beginning in the 1920s, however, judges such as Benjamin N. Cardozo, Henry J. Friendly, Learned Hand, and Harlan Fiske Stone used law to facilitate the entry of the underclass into the economic and social mainstream and to promote tolerance among all New Yorkers. Ultimately, says William Nelson, a new legal ideology was created. By the late 1930s, New Yorkers had begun to reconceptualize social conflict not along class lines but in terms of the power of majorities and the rights of minorities. In the process, they constructed a new approach to law and politics. Though doctrinal change began to slow by the 1960s, the main ambitions of the legalist reformation--liberty, equality, human dignity, and entrepreneurial opportunity--remain the aspirations of nearly all Americans, and of much of the rest of the world, today.
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Author: Vivienne Sanders

Publisher: Hachette UK

ISBN: 1444150499

Category: Education

Page: 192

View: 6679

The Access to History series is the most popular and trusted series for AS and A level history students. Design features include: AS questions and exam tips; Definitions of key terms; Summaries of key historical debates. This title is designed specifically for the Edexcel AS specifications for 2008. It charts the political course of America in this period, from the Watergate scandal to the Clinton years. It focuses both on the political and presidential developments of the time and analyses how these manifest themselves socially and culturally, from sport to race relations. Finally, the book concludes by examining the state of the USA by 2001. Key dates, terms and issues are highlighted, and historical interpretations of key debates are outlined. Summary diagrams are included to consolidate knowledge and understanding of the period, and exam-style questions and tips for each examination board provide the opportunity to develop exam skills.
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Robert Kennedy, Cesar Chavez, and the Dream of Dignity

Author: Steven W. Bender

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1317254961

Category: Social Science

Page: 264

View: 6822

"Courageous." -Ilan Stavans, author of Spanglish: The Making of a New American Language Robert Kennedy and Cesar Chavez came from opposite sides of the tracks of race and class that still divide Americans. Both optimists, Kennedy and Chavez shared a common vision of equality. They united in the 1960s to crusade for the rights of migrant farm workers. Farm workers faded from public consciousness following Kennedy's assassination and Chavez's early passing. Yet the work of Kennedy and Chavez continues to reverberate in America today. Bender chronicles their warm friendship and embraces their bold political vision for making the American dream a reality for all. Although many books discuss Kennedy or Chavez individually, this is the first book to capture their multifaceted relationship and its relevance to mainstream U.S. politics and Latino/a politics today. Bender examines their shared legacy and its continuing influence on political issues including immigration, education, war, poverty, and religion. Mapping a new political path for Mexican Americans and the poor of all backgrounds, this book argues that there is still time to prove Kennedy and Chavez right.
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Harvard, Yale, and America in 1968

Author: George Howe Colt

Publisher: Scribner

ISBN: 1501104780

Category: History

Page: 400

View: 8499

From the author of the bestselling National Book Award finalist The Big House comes a story in the tradition of The Boys in the Boat about an unforgettable group of young athletes who battled in the legendary Harvard-Yale football game of 1968 amidst the sweeping currents of one of the most transformative years in American history. On November 23, 1968, near the end of a turbulent and memorable year, there was a football game that would also prove turbulent and memorable: the season-ending clash between Harvard and Yale. Both teams entered undefeated and, technically at least, came out undefeated. The final score was 29-29. To some of the players on the field, it was a triumph; to others a tragedy. And to many, the reasons had as much to do with one side’s miraculous comeback in the game’s final 42 seconds as it did with the months that preceded it, months that witnessed the assassinations of Martin Luther King and Robert F. Kennedy, police brutality at the Democratic National Convention, inner-city riots, campus takeovers, and, looming over everything, the war in Vietnam. George Howe Colt’s The Game is the story of that iconic American year, as seen through the young men who lived it and were changed by it. One player had recently returned from eight months under fire in Vietnam. Two were members of the radical antiwar group SDS. There was an all-American football hero whose nickname was “God.” There was one NFL prospect who quit to devote his time to black altruism, another who went on to be Pro-Bowler Calvin Hill. There was a postal clerk’s son who worried about fitting in with the preppies, and a wealthy WASP eager to prove he could handle the blue-collar kids’ hits. There was a guard named Tommy Lee Jones, and fullback who dated a young Meryl Streep. They came from every class and background, but played side by side and together forged a moment of startling grace in the midst of the storm. Vivid, lively, and constantly surprising, this magnificent and intimate work of history is the story of ordinary people in an extraordinary time, and of a country facing issues that we continue to wrestle with to this day.
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The Election That Changed America

Author: Lewis L. Gould

Publisher: Government Institutes

ISBN: 1566639107

Category: History

Page: 192

View: 6341

The race for the White House in 1968 was a watershed event in American politics. In this brilliantly succinct narrative analysis, Lewis L. Gould shows how the events of that tumultuous year changed the way Americans felt about politics and their national leaders; how Republicans used the skills they brought to Richard Nixon's campaign to create a generation-long ascendancy in presidential politics; and how Democrats, divided and torn after 1968, emerged as only crippled challengers for the White House throughout most of the years until the early twenty-first century. Bitterness over racial issues and the Vietnam War that marked the 1968 election continued to shape national affairs and to rile American society for years afterward. And the election accelerated an erosion of confidence in American institutions that has not yet reached a conclusion. In his lucid account, now revised and updated, Mr. Gould emphasizes the importance of race as the campaign's key issue and examines the now infamous "October surprises" of Lyndon Johnson and Richard Nixon as he describes the extraordinary events of what Eugene McCarthy later called the "Hard Year."
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Power, Politics, and the Presidency in America's Year of Upheaval

Author: Kyle Longley

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 110814120X

Category: History

Page: 380

View: 9981

1968 was an unprecedented year in terms of upheaval on numerous scales: political, military, economic, social, cultural. In the United States, perhaps no one was more undone by the events of 1968 than President Lyndon Baines Johnson. Kyle Longley leads his readers on a behind-the-scenes tour of what Johnson characterized as the 'year of a continuous nightmare'. Longley explores how LBJ perceived the most significant events of 1968, including the Vietnam War, the assassinations of Martin Luther King, Jr and Robert Kennedy, and the violent Democratic National Convention in Chicago. His responses to the crises were sometimes effective but often tragic, and LBJ's refusal to seek re-election underscores his recognition of the challenges facing the country in 1968. As much a biography of a single year as it is of LBJ, LBJ's 1968 vividly captures the tumult that dominated the headlines on a local and global level.
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Author: CTI Reviews

Publisher: Cram101 Textbook Reviews

ISBN: 147842592X

Category: Education

Page: 62

View: 9433

Facts101 is your complete guide to Parties and Elections in America, The Electoral Process. In this book, you will learn topics such as as those in your book plus much more. With key features such as key terms, people and places, Facts101 gives you all the information you need to prepare for your next exam. Our practice tests are specific to the textbook and we have designed tools to make the most of your limited study time.
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Author: Beate Kutschke,Barley Norton

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1107244501

Category: Music

Page: N.A

View: 2048

Music was integral to the profound cultural, social and political changes that swept the globe in 1968. This collection of essays offers new perspectives on the role that music played in the events of that year, which included protests against the ongoing Vietnam War, the May riots in France and the assassination of Martin Luther King, Jr. From underground folk music in Japan to antiauthoritarian music in Scandinavia and Germany, Music and Protest in 1968 explores music's key role as a means of socio-political dissent not just in the US and the UK but in Asia, North and South America, Europe and Africa. Contributors extend the understanding of musical protest far beyond a narrow view of the 'protest song' to explore how politics and social protest played out in many genres, including experimental and avant-garde music, free jazz, rock, popular song, and film and theatre music.
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The 1968 Election and the Politics of Division

Author: Michael A. Cohen

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0199382123

Category: History

Page: N.A

View: 5502

In his presidential inaugural address of January 1965, Lyndon Johnson offered an uplifting vision for America, one that would end poverty and racial injustice. Elected in a landslide over the conservative Republican Barry Goldwater and bolstered by the so-called liberal consensus, economic prosperity, and a strong wave of nostalgia for his martyred predecessor, John Kennedy, Johnson announced the most ambitious government agenda in decades. Three years later, everything had changed. Johnson's approval ratings had plummeted; the liberal consensus was shattered; the war in Vietnam splintered the nation; and the politics of civil rights had created a fierce white backlash. A report from the National Committee for an Effective Congress warned of a "national nervous breakdown." The election of 1968 was immediately caught up in a swirl of powerful forces, and the nine men who sought the nation's highest office that year attempted to ride them to victory-or merely survive them. On the Democratic side, Eugene McCarthy energized the anti-war movement; George Wallace spoke to the working-class white backlash; Robert Kennedy took on the mantle of his slain brother. Entangled in Vietnam, Johnson, stunningly, opted not to run again, scrambling the odds. On the Republican side, 1968 saw the vindication of Richard Nixon, who outhustled Nelson Rockefeller, Ronald Reagan and George Romney, by navigating between the conservative and moderate wings of the Republican Party. The assassinations of first Martin Luther King, Jr., and then Kennedy seemed to push the country to the brink of chaos, a chaos reflected in the Democratic Convention in Chicago, a televised horror show. Vice President Hubert Humphrey emerged as the nominee, and, finally liberating himself from Johnson's grip, nearly overcame the lead long enjoyed by Nixon who, by exploiting division and channeling the national yearning for order, would be the last man standing. In American Maelstrom, Michael A. Cohen captures the full drama of this watershed election, establishing 1968 as the hinge between the decline of political liberalism, the ascendancy of conservative populism, and the rise of anti-government attitudes that continue to dominate the nation's political discourse. In this sweeping and immersive book, equal parts compelling analysis and thrilling narrative, Cohen takes us to the very source of our modern politics of division.
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Author: Oliver Rathkolb,Friedrich Stadler

Publisher: V&R unipress GmbH

ISBN: 3899716663

Category: History

Page: 294

View: 4306

English summary: The year 1968 remains a central topic of public debate and of contemporary history with special focus on myth building and myth deconstruction. Both the 1968er generation and their opposing groups tried to influence and dominate politics. 1968 is a symbol of a decade between revolution and rebellion, shaped by resistance against open and structural violence of the social and political establishment - a concrete utopia of an other society. In this anthology, the year 1968, still highly disputed among contemporary historians and political scientists, is analyzed from an interdisciplinary and international perspective with intense descriptions and comparative approach: singular events are discussed within a context, the loaded symbols are interpreted, ambivalent codes are decoded and relevant historiography is expounded - influenced by legitimization efforts and fundamental critique. German text. German description: Das Jahr 1968 bleibt Gegenstand offentlicher Debatten und der zeitgeschichtlichen Historiografie zwischen Mythos-Pflege und kritischer Rekonstruktion. Diese Historiografie hat den Anspruch, die 68er-Generation und legitimatorische Strategien pro und contra 1968er-Bewegung aus gegenwartiger Sicht zu deuten. 1968 steht international als Symbol fur eine Dekade zwischen Revolution und Rebellion, den Widerstand gegen die offene und strukturelle Gewalt des gesellschaftlichen und politischen Establishments - als konkrete Utopie von einer anderen Gesellschaft. Das bis heute in der Zeitgeschichte kontrovers dargestellte Jahr 1968 wird in diesem Band aus interdisziplinarer und internationaler Perspektive in Form von dichten Beschreibungen und Analysen vergleichend behandelt: Die singularen Ereignisse werden kontextuell beschrieben, die aufgeladenen Symbole interpretiert und die mehrdeutigen Chiffren dekodiert. Nicht zuletzt wird dessen Historiografie zwischen Legitimation und Fundamentalkritik problematisiert.
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Author: Cora Lee Upshur-Ransome

Publisher: University Press of America

ISBN: 9780761818373

Category: Education

Page: 137

View: 1724

A Comparison of the African American Presence in an Early and Later American History Textbook, uses content analysis of texts to alert readers to the omission and distortion of the history of African-Americans, in the hope that this practice will motivate readers to help change this unfair practice. This will be an important and useful book to teachers and curriculum committees, and will assist them in planning more effectively and efficiently for students.
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Author: Peter K. Eisinger

Publisher: Brookings Institution Press

ISBN: 9780815791249

Category: Political Science

Page: 225

View: 605

Cheap, plentiful food is an American tradition. We spend a smaller percentage of our income on food than any other nation. We feed much of the world with our surpluses. Consumers, retailers, and restaurants throw away one-quarter of our food stock every year. And yet data collected by the federal government show that almost 12 percent of American households either suffer from hunger or worry about going hungry. Why are so many Americans afflicted with "food insecurity" during such prosperous times? According to this book, it's not simply an artifact of poverty: even most of the poorest homes have access to adequate food. Nor is it indifference to their plight or a lack of ways to help: Americans strongly support government food assistance, and there are a host of public and private programs devoted to feeding the hungry. Peter Eisinger seeks to unravel the puzzle of America's hunger and asserts that it is a problem that can be solved. He believes that the perception of hunger and responses to it emerge from a complex, intellectual, political, and social context. He begins by looking for a meaningful definition of hunger, then examines the structure and funding of government food assistance programs, the roles of Congress and community interest groups, and the contributions of volunteer organizations. He concludes by offering ideas to reduce the nation's perplexing hunger problem, based on creating stronger partnerships between public and private food programs.
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History, Rhetoric, Law

Author: Rudolph J. R. Peritz

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780195360660

Category: Law

Page: 384

View: 5993

Americans have long appealed to images of free competition in calling for free enterprise, freedom of contract, free labor, free trade, and free speech. This imagery has retained its appeal in myriad aspects of public policy--for example, Senator Sherman's Anti-Trust Act of 1890, Justice Holmes's metaphorical marketplace of ideas, and President Reagan's rhetoric of deregulation. In Competition Policy in America, 1888-1992, Rudolph Peritz explores the durability of free competition imagery by tracing its influences on public policy. Looking at congressional debates and hearings, administrative agency activities, court opinions, arguments of counsel, and economic, legal, and political scholarship, he finds that free competition has actually evoked two different visions--freedom not only from oppressive government, but also from private economic power. He shows how the discourse of free competition has mediated between commitments to individual liberty and rough equality--themselves unstable over time. This rhetorical approach allows us to understand, for example, that the Reagan and Carter programs of deregulation, both inspired by the rhetoric of free competition, were driven by fundamentally different visions of political economy. Peritz's historical inquiry into competition policy as a series of government directives, inspired by two complex yet distinct and sometimes contradictory visions of free competition, provides an indispensable framework for understanding modern political economy-- whether political campaign finance reform, corporate takeover regulation, or current attitudes toward the New Deal Legacy. Competition Policy in America will be of great interest to lawyers, historians, economists, sociologists, and policy makers in both government and business.
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