Music, Politics, Chaos, Counterculture, and the Shaping of a Generation

Author: Charles Kaiser

Publisher: Grove/Atlantic, Inc.

ISBN: 0802193242

Category: History

Page: 336

View: 717

From assassinations to student riots, this is “a splendidly evocative account of a historic year—a year of tumult, of trauma, and of tragedy” (Arthur Schlesinger Jr.). In the United States, the 1960s were a period of unprecedented change and upheaval—but the year 1968 in particular stands out as a dramatic turning point. Americans witnessed the Tet offensive in Vietnam; the shocking assassinations of Martin Luther King Jr. and Robert Kennedy; and the chaos at the Democratic National Convention in Chicago. At the same time, a young generation was questioning authority like never before—and popular culture, especially music, was being revolutionized. Largely based on unpublished interviews and documents—including in-depth conversations with Eugene McCarthy and Bob Dylan, among many others, and the late Theodore White’s archives, to which the author had sole access—1968 in America is a fascinating social history, and the definitive study of a year when nothing could be taken for granted. “Kaiser aims to convey not only what happened during the period but what it felt like at the time. Affecting touches bring back powerful memories, including strong accounts of the impact of the Tet offensive and of the frenzy aroused by Bobby Kennedy’s race for the presidency.” —The New York Times Book Review
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Author: Mark Kurlansky

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9783453600393

Category: History, Modern

Page: 460

View: 8145

Tet-Offensive in Vietnam, Antikriegsbewegung, Prager Frühling, Rassenunruhen in Amerika und Notstandsgesetze in Deutschland, Pariser Mai und Demonstrationen polnischer und italienischer, mexikanischer und japanischer Studenten. Abbie Hoffman in New York,
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Revisiting 1968 in America

Author: Jules Witcover

Publisher: Grand Central Publishing

ISBN: 9780446674713

Category: History

Page: 512

View: 9656

The assassination of Kennedy & Luther King, the Tet offensive in Vietnam, campus riots & the election of Nixon. The year is 1968 & for millions of Americans the dream of a nation facing up to basic problems at home & abroad were shattered.
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A Thesis, 1963-2008

Author: Leslie Herzberger

Publisher: Xlibris Corporation

ISBN: 146910010X

Category: Reference

Page: 190

View: 7022

Thermidor is just another way of saying Inquisition. At a point in time, the structure is in trouble. You either fix the structure, or you start shooting the people in the life of a complex group called a society. The shooting of people in a complex group, randomly constituted on account of the structure is what we call an Inquisition.
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The Year of Awakening

Author: Patricia W. Romero

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: African Americans

Page: 445

View: 3973

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TV in an Era of Change, 1968-1978

Author: Josh Ozersky

Publisher: SIU Press

ISBN: 9780809325078

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 194

View: 6050

Archie Bunker’s America discerns what was "in the air” as television networks tried to accommodate cultural and political swings in America from the Vietnam era through the late 1970s. Josh Ozersky’s spirited examination of the ways America changed television during a period of intense social upheaval, recuperation, and fragmentation uncovers a bold and beguiling facet of American cultural history. From the conflict-based comedy of All in the Family and such post-sixties frolics as Three’s Company to tendentiously apolitical programs like Happy Days, Ozersky describes the range and power of television to echo larger schemes of American life. Around 1968, advertisers who were anxious to break into the lucrative baby-boomer demographic convinced television networks to begin to abandon prime-time programming that catered to universal audiences. With the market splintering, networks ventured into more issue-based and controversial territories. While early network attempts at more "relevant” programming failed, Ozersky examines how CBS struck gold with the political comedy All in the Family in 1971 and how other successful, conflict-based comedies turned away from typical show business conventions. As the 1970s wore on, the innovations of the previous years began to lose their public appeal. After Vietnam and Watergate, Ozersky argues, Americans were exhausted from the political turbulence of the preceding decade and were ready for a televisual "return to normalcy.” Straightforward, engaging, and liberally illustrated, Archie Bunker’s America is peppered with the stories of outsider cops and failed variety shows, of a young Bill Murray and an old Ed Sullivan, of Mary Tyler Moore, Fonzie, and the Skipper, too. Drawing on interviews with television insiders, trade publications, and the programs themselves, Ozersky chronicles the ongoing attempts of prime-time television to program for a fragmented audience--an audience whose greatest common denominator, by 1978, may well have been the act of watching television itself. The book also includes a foreword by renowned media critic Mark Crispin Miller and an epilogue of related commentary on the following decades.
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1936: Wie neun Ruderer die Nazis in die Knie zwangen

Author: Daniel James Brown

Publisher: Riemann Verlag

ISBN: 3641093309

Category: History

Page: 496

View: 2607

Der Millionenseller aus den USA Von Beginn an ist es eine Reise mit unwahrscheinlichem Ausgang: Neun junge Männer aus der amerikanischen Provinz machen sich 1936 auf den Weg nach Berlin, um die Goldmedaille im Rudern zu gewinnen. Daniel James Brown schildert das Schicksal von Joe Rantz, einem Jungen ohne Perspektive, der rudert, um den Dämonen seiner Vergangenheit zu entkommen und seinen Platz in der Welt zu finden. Wie er und seine Freunde vor den laufenden Kameras Leni Riefenstahls den Nazis ihre Propagandashow stehlen, ist ein atemberaubendes Abenteuer und zugleich das eindringliche Porträt einer Ära. Eine unvergessliche wahre Geschichte von Entschlossenheit, Überleben und Mut.
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Law, Politics, and Ideology in New York, 1920-1980

Author: William E. Nelson

Publisher: Univ of North Carolina Press

ISBN: 0807875562

Category: Law

Page: 472

View: 1894

Based on a detailed examination of New York case law, this pathbreaking book shows how law, politics, and ideology in the state changed in tandem between 1920 and 1980. Early twentieth-century New York was the scene of intense struggle between white, Anglo-Saxon, Protestant upper and middle classes located primarily in the upstate region and the impoverished, mainly Jewish and Roman Catholic, immigrant underclass centered in New York City. Beginning in the 1920s, however, judges such as Benjamin N. Cardozo, Henry J. Friendly, Learned Hand, and Harlan Fiske Stone used law to facilitate the entry of the underclass into the economic and social mainstream and to promote tolerance among all New Yorkers. Ultimately, says William Nelson, a new legal ideology was created. By the late 1930s, New Yorkers had begun to reconceptualize social conflict not along class lines but in terms of the power of majorities and the rights of minorities. In the process, they constructed a new approach to law and politics. Though doctrinal change began to slow by the 1960s, the main ambitions of the legalist reformation--liberty, equality, human dignity, and entrepreneurial opportunity--remain the aspirations of nearly all Americans, and of much of the rest of the world, today.
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Author: Vivienne Sanders

Publisher: Hachette UK

ISBN: 1444150499

Category: Education

Page: 192

View: 1089

The Access to History series is the most popular and trusted series for AS and A level history students. Design features include: AS questions and exam tips; Definitions of key terms; Summaries of key historical debates. This title is designed specifically for the Edexcel AS specifications for 2008. It charts the political course of America in this period, from the Watergate scandal to the Clinton years. It focuses both on the political and presidential developments of the time and analyses how these manifest themselves socially and culturally, from sport to race relations. Finally, the book concludes by examining the state of the USA by 2001. Key dates, terms and issues are highlighted, and historical interpretations of key debates are outlined. Summary diagrams are included to consolidate knowledge and understanding of the period, and exam-style questions and tips for each examination board provide the opportunity to develop exam skills.
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Robert Kennedy, Cesar Chavez, and the Dream of Dignity

Author: Steven W. Bender

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1317254961

Category: Social Science

Page: 264

View: 1435

"Courageous." -Ilan Stavans, author of Spanglish: The Making of a New American Language Robert Kennedy and Cesar Chavez came from opposite sides of the tracks of race and class that still divide Americans. Both optimists, Kennedy and Chavez shared a common vision of equality. They united in the 1960s to crusade for the rights of migrant farm workers. Farm workers faded from public consciousness following Kennedy's assassination and Chavez's early passing. Yet the work of Kennedy and Chavez continues to reverberate in America today. Bender chronicles their warm friendship and embraces their bold political vision for making the American dream a reality for all. Although many books discuss Kennedy or Chavez individually, this is the first book to capture their multifaceted relationship and its relevance to mainstream U.S. politics and Latino/a politics today. Bender examines their shared legacy and its continuing influence on political issues including immigration, education, war, poverty, and religion. Mapping a new political path for Mexican Americans and the poor of all backgrounds, this book argues that there is still time to prove Kennedy and Chavez right.
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Harvard, Yale, and America in 1968

Author: George Howe Colt

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN: 1501104802

Category: History

Page: 400

View: 9762

From the author of the bestselling National Book Award finalist The Big House comes a story in the tradition of The Boys in the Boat about an unforgettable group of young athletes who battled in the legendary Harvard-Yale football game of 1968 amidst the sweeping currents of one of the most transformative years in American history. On November 23, 1968, near the end of a turbulent and memorable year, there was a football game that would also prove turbulent and memorable: the season-ending clash between Harvard and Yale. Both teams entered undefeated and, technically at least, came out undefeated. The final score was 29-29. To some of the players on the field, it was a triumph; to others a tragedy. And to many, the reasons had as much to do with one side’s miraculous comeback in the game’s final 42 seconds as it did with the months that preceded it, months that witnessed the assassinations of Martin Luther King and Robert F. Kennedy, police brutality at the Democratic National Convention, inner-city riots, campus takeovers, and, looming over everything, the war in Vietnam. George Howe Colt’s The Game is the story of that iconic American year, as seen through the young men who lived it and were changed by it. One player had recently returned from eight months under fire in Vietnam. Two were members of the radical antiwar group SDS. There was an all-American football hero whose nickname was “God.” There was one NFL prospect who quit to devote his time to black altruism, another who went on to be Pro-Bowler Calvin Hill. There was a postal clerk’s son who worried about fitting in with the preppies, and a wealthy WASP eager to prove he could handle the blue-collar kids’ hits. There was a guard named Tommy Lee Jones, and fullback who dated a young Meryl Streep. They came from every class and background, but played side by side and together forged a moment of startling grace in the midst of the storm. Vivid, lively, and constantly surprising, this magnificent and intimate work of history is the story of ordinary people in an extraordinary time, and of a country facing issues that we continue to wrestle with to this day.
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A Chronology of Offenses, Legislation and Related Events

Author: Michael Newton

Publisher: McFarland

ISBN: 0786474769

Category: Political Science

Page: 332

View: 4954

Crimes motivated by prejudice date to the beginning of human history. Despite legislation addressing bias-driven offenses hate crimes continue to plague modern American society. Beginning with the assassination of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., and the passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1968 six days later, this chronology catalogs hate crimes and the relevant statutes and amendments affecting the definition, prosecution and punishment of hate crimes within the U.S. through 2013. The introduction sketches the history of hate crimes legislation through 1968, while an appendix lists and briefly describes hate crime statutes presently in force in various states. From racial violence and attacks on gays and lesbians to the bombings of abortion clinics by "pro-life" extremists to assaults on Muslims in the wake of 9/11, this reference work lays bare an ugly but critical aspect of American history.
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The Brutal Odyssey of an Outlaw Journalist

Author: Hunter S. Thompson

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN: 1439126364

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 784

View: 2638

From the king of “Gonzo” journalism and bestselling author who brought you Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas comes another astonishing volume of letters by Hunter S. Thompson. Brazen, incisive, and outrageous as ever, this second volume of Thompson’s private correspondence is the highly anticipated follow-up to The Proud Highway. When that first book of letters appeared in 1997, Time pronounced it "deliriously entertaining"; Rolling Stone called it "brilliant beyond description"; and The New York Times celebrated its "wicked humor and bracing political conviction." Spanning the years between 1968 and 1976, these never-before-published letters show Thompson building his legend: running for sheriff in Aspen, Colorado; creating the seminal road book Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas; twisting political reporting to new heights for Rolling Stone; and making sense of it all in the landmark Fear and Loathing on the Campaign Trail '72. To read Thompson's dispatches from these years—addressed to the author's friends, enemies, editors, and creditors, and such notables as Jimmy Carter, Tom Wolfe, and Kurt Vonnegut—is to read a raw, revolutionary eyewitness account of one of the most exciting and pivotal eras in American history.
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The Election That Changed America

Author: Lewis L. Gould

Publisher: Government Institutes

ISBN: 1566639107

Category: History

Page: 192

View: 9131

The race for the White House in 1968 was a watershed event in American politics. In this brilliantly succinct narrative analysis, Lewis L. Gould shows how the events of that tumultuous year changed the way Americans felt about politics and their national leaders; how Republicans used the skills they brought to Richard Nixon's campaign to create a generation-long ascendancy in presidential politics; and how Democrats, divided and torn after 1968, emerged as only crippled challengers for the White House throughout most of the years until the early twenty-first century. Bitterness over racial issues and the Vietnam War that marked the 1968 election continued to shape national affairs and to rile American society for years afterward. And the election accelerated an erosion of confidence in American institutions that has not yet reached a conclusion. In his lucid account, now revised and updated, Mr. Gould emphasizes the importance of race as the campaign's key issue and examines the now infamous "October surprises" of Lyndon Johnson and Richard Nixon as he describes the extraordinary events of what Eugene McCarthy later called the "Hard Year."
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Power, Politics, and the Presidency in America's Year of Upheaval

Author: Kyle Longley

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1108140572

Category: History

Page: N.A

View: 1763

1968 was an unprecedented year in terms of upheaval on numerous scales: political, military, economic, social, cultural. In the United States, perhaps no one was more undone by the events of 1968 than President Lyndon Baines Johnson. Kyle Longley leads his readers on a behind-the-scenes tour of what Johnson characterized as the 'year of a continuous nightmare'. Longley explores how LBJ perceived the most significant events of 1968, including the Vietnam War, the assassinations of Martin Luther King, Jr and Robert Kennedy, and the violent Democratic National Convention in Chicago. His responses to the crises were sometimes effective but often tragic, and LBJ's refusal to seek re-election underscores his recognition of the challenges facing the country in 1968. As much a biography of a single year as it is of LBJ, LBJ's 1968 vividly captures the tumult that dominated the headlines on a local and global level.
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The 1968 Revolution in American Catholic Education

Author: Peter M. Mitchell

Publisher: Ignatius Press

ISBN: 1586177567

Category: Religion

Page: 320

View: 4329

1968 witnessed perhaps the greatest revolution in the history of the Catholic Church in the United States. It was led by Fr. Charles Curran, professor of Theology at the Catholic University of America in Washington, with more than 500 theologians who signed a "Statement of Dissent" that declared Catholics were not bound in conscience to follow the Church's teaching in the encyclical of Pope Paul VI,Humanae Vitae, that artificial contraception is morally wrong because it is destructive of the good of Christian marriage. The battle at Catholic University centered on the major question in Catholic higher education during the turbulent years after the Second Vatican Council, "What is the meaning of academic freedom at a Catholic university?" Curran and the dissenting theologians maintained they needed to be free to teach without constraint by any outside authority, including the bishops. The bishops maintained that the American tradition of religious freedom guaranteed the right of religiously-affiliated schools to require their professors to teach in accord with the authority of their church. This clash over the authority of the Magisterium of the Church within its own academic institutions was at the heart of the dramatic clash which unfolded at CUA. This book uses never-before published material from the personal papers of the key players at CUA to tell the inside story of the dramatic events that unfolded there in the late 1960's. Beginning with the 1967 faculty-led strike in support of Curran, this book reveals the content of the internal discussions between the key bishops on the CUA Board of Trustees. Incorporating personal interviews with Curran, the author presents a balanced account of the deep frustration and anger against the institutional authority of the Church which played into the hands of the dissenting theologians. This work attempts to disprove both the standard "liberal" and "conservative" interpretation of the events of 1968, suggesting that the culture of dissent was a direct fruit of the excessive legalism and authoritarianism which marked the Church in the United States during the years preceding Vatican II. Because the polarization in 1968 has continued to define the experience of many American Catholics and has had an ongoing effect on Catholic education, this work should be extremely interesting to those who wish to understand the recent past so as to move forward into the 21st century with a greater awareness of the strengths and weaknesses of Catholic education in the United States.
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A Turning Point of the American War in Vietnam

Author: Mark Bowden

Publisher: Atlantic Monthly Press

ISBN: 0802189245

Category: History

Page: 594

View: 8819

New York Times Bestseller A Los Angeles Times Book Prize Finalist in History Winner of the 2018 Marine Corps Heritage Foundation Greene Award for a distinguished work of nonfiction "An extraordinary feat of journalism . . . full of emotion and color."—Karl Marlantes, Wall Street Journal The first battle book from Mark Bowden since his #1 New York Times bestseller Black Hawk Down, Hue 1968 is the story of the centerpiece of the Tet Offensive and a turning point in the American War in Vietnam. In the early hours of January 31, 1968, the North Vietnamese launched over one hundred attacks across South Vietnam in what would become known as the Tet Offensive. The lynchpin of Tet was the capture of Hue, Vietnam?s intellectual and cultural capital, by 10,000 National Liberation Front troops who descended from hidden camps and surged across the city of 140,000. Within hours the entire city was in their hands save for two small military outposts. American commanders refused to believe the size and scope of the Front?s presence, ordering small companies of marines against thousands of entrenched enemy troops. After several futile and deadly days, Lieutenant Colonel Ernie Cheatham would finally come up with a strategy to retake the city, block by block and building by building, in some of the most intense urban combat since World War II. With unprecedented access to war archives in the U.S. and Vietnam and interviews with participants from both sides, Bowden narrates each stage of this crucial battle through multiple viewpoints. Played out over 24 days and ultimately costing 10,000 lives, the Battle of Hue was by far the bloodiest of the entire war. When it ended, the American debate was never again about winning, only about how to leave. Hue 1968 is a gripping and moving account of this pivotal moment.
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