The Emergence of a Modern Narrative Form

Author: John C. Hartsock

Publisher: Univ of Massachusetts Press

ISBN: 9781558492523

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 294

View: 3757

This study examines the roots of the distinctive form of writing known as journalism - whether called literary journalism or creative non-fiction - and argues that within America it can be traced at least as far back as the late-19th century.
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Author: Norman Sims

Publisher: Northwestern University Press

ISBN: 0810125196

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 297

View: 9731

This wide-ranging collection of critical essays on literary journalism addresses the shifting border between fiction and non-fiction, literature and journalism. Literary Journalism in the Twentieth Century addresses general and historical issues, explores questions of authorial intent and the status of the territory between literature and journalism, and offers a case study of Mary McCarthy’s 1953 piece, "Artists in Uniform," a classic of literary journalism. Sims offers a thought-provoking study of the nature of perception and the truth, as well as issues facing journalism today.
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A Historical Anthology of Literary Journalism

Author: Kevin Kerrane,Ben Yagoda

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN: 9780684846309

Category: History

Page: 560

View: 7074

Historical and international in scope, a unique anthology traces the course of literary journalism and nonfiction prose from its origins in the eighteenth century to today, from Daniel Defoe to Joseph Mitchell to Richard Ben Cramer. 15,000 first printing.
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A Biographical Dictionary of Writers and Editors

Author: Edd Applegate

Publisher: Greenwood Publishing Group

ISBN: 9780313299490

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 326

View: 6391

Overviews literary journalism and provides biographical entries for writers and editors who practiced literary journalism.
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Author: Stephen L. Vaughn

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1135880204

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 664

View: 9620

The Encyclopedia of American Journalism explores the distinctions found in print media, radio, television, and the internet. This work seeks to document the role of these different forms of journalism in the formation of America's understanding and reaction to political campaigns, war, peace, protest, slavery, consumer rights, civil rights, immigration, unionism, feminism, environmentalism, globalization, and more. This work also explores the intersections between journalism and other phenomena in American Society, such as law, crime, business, and consumption. The evolution of journalism's ethical standards is discussed, as well as the important libel and defamation trials that have influenced journalistic practice, its legal protection, and legal responsibilities. Topics covered include: Associations and Organizations; Historical Overview and Practice; Individuals; Journalism in American History; Laws, Acts, and Legislation; Print, Broadcast, Newsgroups, and Corporations; Technologies.
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Author: John C. Hartsock

Publisher: University of Massachusetts Press

ISBN: 9781625341730

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 224

View: 9863

Proponents and practitioners of narrative literary journalism have sought to assert its distinctiveness as both a literary form and a type of journalism. In Literary Journalism and the Aesthetics of Experience, John C. Hartsock argues that this often neglected kind of journalism--exemplified by such renowned works as John Hersey's Hiroshima, James Agee's Let Us Now Praise Famous Men, and Joan Didion's Slouching Towards Bethlehem--has emerged as an important genre of its own, not just a hybrid of the techniques of fiction and the conventions of traditional journalism. Hartsock situates narrative literary journalism within the broader histories of the American tradition of "objective" journalism and the standard novel. While all embrace the value of narrative, or storytelling, literary journalism offers a particular "aesthetics of experience" lacking in both the others. Not only does literary journalism disrupt the myths sustained by conventional journalism and the novel, but its rich details and attention to everyday life question readers' cultural assumptions. Drawing on the critical theories of Nietzsche, Bakhtin, Benjamin, and others, Hartsock argues that the aesthetics of experience challenge the shibboleths that often obscure the realities the other two forms seek to convey. At a time when print media appear in decline, Hartsock offers a thoughtful response to those who ask, "What place if any is there for a narrative literary journalism in a rapidly changing media world?"
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Author: Sonja Merljak Zdovc

Publisher: University Press of America

ISBN: 9780761841562

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 145

View: 4558

Slovenia is acquiring some literary journalism written by Slovene journalists and writers. Author Sonja Merljak Zdovc suggests that more Slovene writers should prefer literary journalism because nonfiction is based on truth, facts, and data and appeals more to readers interested in real world stories. The honest, precise, profound, and sophisticated voice of literary journalism is becoming increasingly good for newspaper circulation, as it reaches not just the mind but also the heart of the reader. Thus, the world of Slovene journalism should also take a turn towards the stylized literary journalism seen in the United States. There, journalists and writers realize that through literary journalism they could perhaps end a general decline of traditional print media by restoring to readers stories that uncover the universal struggle of the human condition.
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Author: Aníbal González

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9780521414258

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 165

View: 2832

Exploring the impact of journalism and journalistic rhetoric on the development of Spanish American narrative, González offers a broad historical panorama of the journalist/narrative interaction.
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Conversations with America's Best Nonfiction Writers on Their Craft

Author: Robert Boynton

Publisher: Vintage

ISBN: 0307429040

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 496

View: 7770

Forty years after Tom Wolfe, Hunter S. Thompson, and Gay Talese launched the New Journalism movement, Robert S. Boynton sits down with nineteen practitioners of what he calls the New New Journalism to discuss their methods, writings and careers. The New New Journalists are first and foremost brilliant reporters who immerse themselves completely in their subjects. Jon Krakauer accompanies a mountaineering expedition to Everest. Ted Conover works for nearly a year as a prison guard. Susan Orlean follows orchid fanciers to reveal an obsessive subculture few knew existed. Adrian Nicole LeBlanc spends nearly a decade reporting on a family in the South Bronx. And like their muckraking early twentieth-century precursors, they are drawn to the most pressing issues of the day: Alex Kotlowitz, Leon Dash, and William Finnegan to race and class; Ron Rosenbaum to the problem of evil; Michael Lewis to boom-and-bust economies; Richard Ben Cramer to the nitty gritty of politics. How do they do it? In these interviews, they reveal the techniques and inspirations behind their acclaimed works, from their felt-tip pens, tape recorders, long car rides, and assumed identities; to their intimate understanding of the way a truly great story unfolds. Interviews with: Gay Talese Jane Kramer Calvin Trillin Richard Ben Cramer Ted Conover Alex Kotlowitz Richard Preston William Langewiesche Eric Schlosser Leon Dash William Finnegan Jonathan Harr Jon Krakauer Adrian Nicole LeBlanc Michael Lewis Susan Orlean Ron Rosenbaum Lawrence Weschler Lawrence Wright
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Other Voices in Literary Journalism

Author: Jan Whitt

Publisher: University Press of America

ISBN: 9780761840930

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 178

View: 516

Settling the Borderland deals with the intimate connection between journalism and literature, both fields in which work by women has been underrepresented. This book has a twin focus: the work of journalists who became some of the greatest novelists, poets, and short-story writers of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries in America, several of whom are men, and contemporary journalists who best exemplify the effective use of literary techniques in news coverage. Although five women are emphasized here (Katherine Anne Porter, Eudora Welty, Joan Didion, Sara Davidson, and Susan Orlean), three men whose work was profoundly influenced by journalism also are included. Edgar Allan Poe, Walt Whitman, and John Steinbeck are well known as writers of poetry, short stories, and novels, but they, too, are among the "other voices" rarely included in studies of literary journalism. In Settling the Borderland, Jan Whitt presents a thorough analysis of the increasingly indistinct lines between truth and fiction and between fact and creative narrative in contemporary media.
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Mythic Cycles in American Literary Journalism

Author: Stephanie Shapiro

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9781934074060

Category: Education

Page: 128

View: 1476

Although literary journalism is now widely accepted as an integral part of all American prose literature, there has been scant examination of its underlying themes, which have remained constant even as the literature itself has evolved. By looking at literary journalism as narrative - the artifact of myth - its cultural power and history are revealed. As a vehicle of myth, literary journalism's growth corresponds to the progression of myth through its primary, romantic and consummatory stages. Each stage of literary journalism is a tool for converting readers through sensational example to the moral values and social obligations of a particular myth stage. Each stage of myth creates the need for the subsequent stage in a continual literary cycle.
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A Century of Literary Journalism

Author: Norman Sims

Publisher: Northwestern University Press

ISBN: 0810124696

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 398

View: 7133

Journalism in the twentieth century was marked by the rise of literary journalism. Sims traces more than a century of its history, examining the cultural connections, competing journalistic schools of thought, and innovative writers that have given literary journalism its power. Seminal exmples of the genre provide ample context and background for the study of this style of journalism.
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New Journalism and Literary Genre in Late Nineteenth-century American Newspapers and Fiction

Author: Karen Roggenkamp

Publisher: Kent State University Press

ISBN: 9780873388269

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 199

View: 8772

A scholarly examination of "new journalism" Due to a burgeoning print marketplace during the late nineteenth century, urban newspapers felt pressure to create entertaining prose that appealed to readers, drawing on popular literary genres such as travel adventures, detective tales, and historical romances as a way of framing the news for readers. Using current events for their source documents, reporters fashioned their own dramas based on those that readers recognized from a broadly drawn literary culture. The desire to spin attractive, popular tales sometimes came at the expense of factual information. This novel, commercialized, and sensationalistic style of reporting, called "new journalism," was closely tied to American fiction. In Narrating the News Karen Roggenkamp examines five major stories featured in three respected New York newspapers during the 1890s--the story of two antebellum hoaxes, Nellie Bly's around-the-world journey, Lizzie Borden's sensational trial, Evangelina Cisneros's rescue from her Spanish captors, and the Janet Cooke "Jimmy's World" scandal--to illustrate how new journalism manipulated specific segments of the literary marketplace. These case studies are complemented by broader cultural analyses that touch on vital topics in literary and cultural studies--gender, expansionism, realism, and professionalization. Unlike previously published studies of literature and journalism, which focus only on a few canonical figures, Roggenkamp looks at part of the history of mass print communications more generally, exposing the competitive and reinforcing interplay between specific literary genres and their journalistic revisions. Narrating the News provides an original, significant contribution to the fields of literature, journalism history, and cultural studies.
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Journalistic Traditions and Transnational Influences

Author: John S. Bak,Bill Reynolds

Publisher: Univ of Massachusetts Press

ISBN: 155849877X

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 306

View: 715

At the end of the nineteenth century, several countries were developing journalistic traditions similar to what we identify today as literary reportage or literary journalism. Yet throughout most of the twentieth century, in particular after World War I, that tradition was overshadowed and even marginalized by the general perception among democratic states that journalism ought to be either "objective," as in the American tradition, or "polemical," as in the European. Nonetheless, literary journalism would survive and, at times, even thrive. How and why is a story that is unique to each nation. Though largely considered an Anglo-American phenomenon today, literary journalism has had a long and complex international history, one built on a combination of traditions and influences that are sometimes quite specific to a nation and at other times come from the blending of cultures across borders. These essays examine this phenomenon from various international perspectives, documenting literary journalism's rich and diverse heritage and describing its development within a global context. In addition to the editors, contributors include David Abrahamson, Peiqin Chen, Clazina Dingemanse, William Dow, Rutger de Graaf, John Hartsock, Nikki Hessell, Maria Lassila-Merisalo, Edvaldo Pereira Lima, Willa McDonald, Jenny McKay, Sonja Merljak Zdovc, Sonia Parratt, Norman Sims, Isabel Soares,and Soenke Zehle.
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Author: Steven R. Serafin,Alfred Bendixen

Publisher: A&C Black

ISBN: 9780826417770

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 1305

View: 9614

More than ten years in the making, this comprehensive single-volume literary survey is for the student, scholar, and general reader. The Continuum Encyclopedia of American Literature represents a collaborative effort, involving 300 contributors from across the US and Canada. Composed of more than 1,100 signed biographical-critical entries, this Encyclopedia serves as both guide and companion to the study and appreciation of American literature. A special feature is the topical article, of which there are 70.
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A Book of Readings

Author: Edwin H. Ford,Edwin Emery

Publisher: U of Minnesota Press

ISBN: 9780816657698

Category: Literary Collections

Page: 414

View: 4646

Highlights in the History of the American Press was first published in 1954. Minnesota Archive Editions uses digital technology to make long-unavailable books once again accessible, and are published unaltered from the original University of Minnesota Press editions. The articles collected in this volume present a vivid panorama of American journalistic history from its antecedents in the English ballad singers to the press giants of modern times. Since there is probably no single force that has played a greater role in the history of America than its newspapers, the history of journalism tells, in large measure, the story of this country's political, social, and economic development. Therefore, this book of readings offers much to the students of the American scene, past and present, whether they are general readers or specialists in journalism, history, American studies, or any of the social sciences. The 27 articles included here have been chosen particularly for their readability and authenticity. They are by many different writers and are from a wide variety of periodicals published over the past 100 years. They are arranged according to six historical periods, covering the rise of the English press, the Colonial press, the nationalistic press of Revolutionary times, the popular press of the Jacksonian democracy, the transition press following the Civil War, and the modern era of mass circulation. An introductory essay for each group of articles places the individual studies in historical perspective and examines briefly the journalistic events not covered in detail by the articles themselves. The article authors include such notable names in American letters as Gamaliel Bradford, Will Irwin, William Allen White, John Dos Passos, and Henry F. Pringle. The coherent presentation of this diverse material should help anyone interested in the American newspaper get a better view of its broad scope, its lively color, and its profound influence on the course of history.
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A History of America First and the American Dream

Author: Sarah Churchwell

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN: 1408894793

Category: History

Page: 384

View: 9221

What does America stand for in the twenty-first century? Behold, America confronts this urgent question by looking at the story behind two of the most contentious phrases in the American political playbook: the 'American dream' and 'America first'. What do these phrases tell us about America's idea of itself? What does it mean to put America first, and what exactly are Americans supposed to be dreaming of – personal wealth, public power, racial equality, political refuge, individual freedoms? What happens when these values collide? 'America first' and the 'American dream' were born nearly a century ago and instantly tangled over capitalism, democracy and race. Invoked most recently in Donald Trump's presidential campaign, they came to embody opposing views in the battle to define the soul of the nation. Behold, America recounts the unknown history of these two expressions using the voices that helped shape that debate, from Capitol Hill to the newsroom of the New York Times, students to senators, dreamers to dissenters. As America struggles again to project a shared vision, to itself and to the world, Sarah Churchwell argues that the meanings and history of these terms need to be understood afresh so that the true spirit of America can be reclaimed. Insightful and revelatory, Behold, America overturns everything we thought we knew about the American dream, America first and the battle for the identity of modern America.
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Author: Nicholas Coles,Paul Lauter

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1108509029

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: N.A

View: 6906

A History of American Working-Class Literature sheds light not only on the lived experience of class but the enormously varied creativity of working-class people throughout the history of what is now the United States. By charting a chronology of working-class experience, as the conditions of work have changed over time, this volume shows how the practice of organizing, economic competition, place, and time shape opportunity and desire. The subjects range from transportation narratives and slave songs to the literature of deindustrialization and globalization. Among the literary forms discussed are memoir, journalism, film, drama, poetry, speeches, fiction, and song. Essays focus on plantation, prison, factory, and farm, as well as on labor unions, workers' theaters, and innovative publishing ventures. Chapters spotlight the intersections of class with race, gender, and place. The variety, depth, and many provocations of this History are certain to enrich the study and teaching of American literature.
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A Reader

Author: Jean Chance,William McKeen

Publisher: Wadsworth Publishing Company

ISBN: 9780534529475

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 214

View: 7770

This first edition reader introduces students to 26 of our greatest literary journalists, from Ernie Pyle to Hunter S. Thompson. It is the most current and complete anthology of the best of literary journalism.
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