Author: George Mousourakis

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1134131984

Category: History

Page: 296

View: 820

This book equips both lawyer and historian with a complete history of Roman law, from its beginnings c.1000 BC through to its re-discovery in Europe where it was widely applied until the eighteenth century. Combining a law specialist’s informed perspective of legal history with a socio-political and cultural focus, it examines the sources of law, the ways in which these laws were applied and enforced, and the ways the law was influenced and progressed, with an exploration of civil and criminal procedures and special attention paid to legal science. The final chapter covers the history of Roman law in late antiquity and appraises the move towards the codification of law that culminated in the final statement of Roman law: the Corpus Iuris Civilis of Emperor Justinian. Throughout the book, George Mousourakis highlights the relationship between Roman law and Roman life by following the lines of the major historical developments. Including bibliographic references and organized accessibly by historical era, this book is an excellent introduction to the history of Roman law for students of both law and ancient history.
Read More

Author: George Mousourakis

Publisher: Taylor & Francis

ISBN: 0415408938

Category: History

Page: 282

View: 6364

This book equips both lawyer and historian with a complete history of Roman law, from it's beginnings c.500BC through to its re-discovery in Europe where it was widely applied until the eighteenth century. Including bibliographic references and organised accessibly by historical era, this book is an excellent introduciton to the history of Roman law for students of both law and ancient history. - Taken from back cover.
Read More

Author: George Mousourakis

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 0203089340

Category: History

Page: 282

View: 541

This book equips both lawyer and historian with a complete history of Roman law, from it's beginnings c.500BC through to its re-discovery in Europe where it was widely applied until the eighteenth century. Including bibliographic references and organised accessibly by historical era, this book is an excellent introduciton to the history of Roman law for students of both law and ancient history. - Taken from back cover.
Read More

Author: Olga Tellegen-Couperus

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1134908016

Category: History

Page: 192

View: 2635

The most important creation of the Romans was their law. In this book, Dr Tellegen-Couperus discusses the way in which the Roman jurists created and developed law and the way in which Roman law has come down to us. Special attention is given to questions such as `who were the jurists and their law schools' and to the close connection between jurists and the politics of their time.
Read More

Author: Andrew M. Riggsby

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 052168711X

Category: History

Page: 283

View: 3042

In this book, Andrew Riggsby surveys the main areas of Roman law, and their place in Roman life.
Read More

Author: Clifford Ando,Kaius Tuori,Paul J. du Plessis

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0198728689

Category:

Page: 650

View: 4253

The Handbook is intended to survey the landscape of contemporary research and chart principal directions of future inquiry. Its aim is to bring to bear upon Roman legal study the full range of intellectual resources of contemporary legal history, from comparison to popular constitutionalism, from international private law to law and society. This unique contribution of the volume sets it apart from others in the field. Furthermore, the volume brings the study of Roman law into closer alignment, and thus into dialogue, with historical, sociological, and anthropological research in law in other periods. The volume is therefore directed not simply to ancient historians and legal historians already focused on the ancient world, but to historians of all periods interested in law and its complex and multifaceted relationship to society.
Read More

Author: George Mousourakis

Publisher: Gower Publishing, Ltd.

ISBN: 9780754621089

Category: Law

Page: 462

View: 4506

Roman law forms an important part of the intellectual background of many legal systems currently in force in continental Europe, Latin America and other parts of the world. This book traces the historical development of Roman law from the earliest period of Roman history up to and including Justinian's codification in the sixth century AD.
Read More

Author: Peter Stein

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9780521643795

Category: History

Page: 137

View: 2899

This is a short and succinct summary of the unique position of Roman law in European culture by one of the world's leading legal historians. Peter Stein's masterly study assesses the impact of Roman law in the ancient world, and its continued unifying influence throughout medieval and modern Europe. Roman Law in European History is unparalleled in lucidity and authority, and should prove of enormous utility for teachers and students (at all levels) of legal history, comparative law and European Studies. Award-winning on its appearance in German translation, this English rendition of a magisterial work of interpretive synthesis is an invaluable contribution to the understanding of perhaps the most important European legal tradition of all.
Read More

Author: George Mousourakis

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 3319122681

Category: Law

Page: 328

View: 8750

This unique publication offers a complete history of Roman law, from its early beginnings through to its resurgence in Europe where it was widely applied until the eighteenth century. Besides a detailed overview of the sources of Roman law, the book also includes sections on private and criminal law and procedure, with special attention given to those aspects of Roman law that have particular importance to today's lawyer. The last three chapters of the book offer an overview of the history of Roman law from the early Middle Ages to modern times and illustrate the way in which Roman law furnished the basis of contemporary civil law systems. In this part, special attention is given to the factors that warranted the revival and subsequent reception of Roman law as the ‘common law’ of Continental Europe. Combining the perspectives of legal history with those of social and political history, the book can be profitably read by students and scholars, as well as by general readers with an interest in ancient and early European legal history. The civil law tradition is the oldest legal tradition in the world today, embracing many legal systems currently in force in Continental Europe, Latin America and other parts of the world. Despite the considerable differences in the substantive laws of civil law countries, a fundamental unity exists between them. The most obvious element of unity is the fact that the civil law systems are all derived from the same sources and their legal institutions are classified in accordance with a commonly accepted scheme existing prior to their own development, which they adopted and adapted at some stage in their history. Roman law is both in point of time and range of influence the first catalyst in the evolution of the civil law tradition.
Read More

An Historical Introduction

Author: Hans Julius Wolff

Publisher: University of Oklahoma Press

ISBN: 9780806112961

Category: Political Science

Page: 260

View: 8482

One of the great and lasting influences on the course of Western culture, Roman law occupies a unique place in the history of the civilized world. Originally the law of a small rural community, then of a powerful city-state, it became the law of an empire which embraced almost all of the known civilized world. The influence of Roman law extends into modern times and is reflected in the great codifications of private law that have come into existence in Europe, America, and Asia. Even now, Roman law in modified form is the law of the land in Scotland, and the civil code of Louisiana is directly based on Roman law. Forming an important part in the historical and intellectual background of understanding and a basis for further development of the principles of international jurisprudence. In this book an international authority on Roman legal history sets forth in clear, understandable English the institutions of Roman law and traces their development through the Byzantine Empire into medieval and modern Europe. It is an indispensable study for every American lawyer and for anyone interesting in legal and political history.
Read More

Theft, Rapine, Damage and Insult

Author: Justinian

Publisher: Penguin UK

ISBN: 0141961368

Category: Law

Page: 192

View: 2617

Codified by Justinian I and published under his aegis in A.D. 533, this celebrated work of legal history forms a fascinating picture of ordinary life in Rome.
Read More

Author: Alan Watson

Publisher: University of Georgia Press

ISBN: 0820330612

Category: Law

Page: 241

View: 440

This book is not about the rules or concepts of Roman law, says Alan Watson, but about the values and approaches, explicit and implicit, of those who made the law. The scope of Watson's concerns encompasses the period from the Twelve Tables, around 451 B.C., to the end of the so-called classical period, around A.D. 235. As he discusses the issues and problems that faced the Roman legal intelligentsia, Watson also holds up Roman law as a clear, although admittedly extreme, example of law's enormous impact on society in light of society's limited input into law. Roman private law has been the most admired and imitated system of private law in the world, but it evolved, Watson argues, as a hobby of gentlemen, albeit a hobby that carried social status. The jurists, the private individuals most responsible for legal development, were first and foremost politicians and (in the Empire) bureaucrats; their engagement with the law was primarily to win the esteem of their peers. The exclusively patrician College of Pontiffs was given a monopoly on interpretation of private law in the mid fifth century B.C. Though the College would lose its exclusivity and monopoly, interpretation of law remained one mark of a Roman gentleman. But only interpretation of the law, not conceptualization or systematization or reform, gave prestige, says Watson. Further, the jurists limited themselves to particular modes of reasoning: no arguments to a ruling could be based on morality, justice, economic welfare, or what was approved elsewhere. No praetor (one of the elected officials who controlled the courts) is famous for introducing reforms, Watson points out, and, in contrast with a nonjurist like Cicero, no jurist theorized about the nature of law. A strong characteristic of Roman law is its relative autonomy, and isolation from the rest of life. Paradoxically, this very autonomy was a key factor in the Reception of Roman Law--the assimilation of the learned Roman law as taught at the universities into the law of the individual territories of Western Europe.
Read More

Author: Dr Geza Alfoldy

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1317668588

Category: History

Page: 266

View: 4013

This study, first published in German in 1975, addresses the need for a comprehensive account of Roman social history in a single volume. Specifically, Alföldy attempts to answer three questions: What is the meaning of Roman social history? What is entailed in Roman social history? How is it to be conceived as history? Alföldy’s approach brings social structure much closer to political development, following the changes in social institutions in parallel with the broader political milieu. He deals with specific problems in seven periods: Archaic Rome, the Republic down to the Second Punic War, the structural change of the second century BC, the end of the Republic, the Early Empire, the crisis of the third century AD and the Late Empire. Excellent bibliographical notes specify the most important works on each subject, making it useful to the graduate student and scholar as well as to the advanced and well-informed undergraduate.
Read More

Author: Alan Watson

Publisher: University of Georgia Press

ISBN: 9780820312613

Category: Law

Page: 328

View: 4988

Provides a comprehensive description of the system of Roman law, discussing slavery, property, contracts, delicts and succession. Also examines the ways in which Roman law influenced later legal systems such as the structure of European legal systems, tort law in the French civil code, differences between contract law in France and Germany, parameters of judicial reasoning, feudal law, and the interests of governments in making and communicating law.
Read More

Author: Ruth Rendell

Publisher: Canongate Books

ISBN: 0857861085

Category: Bibles

Page: 48

View: 8522

Paul was the most influential figure in the early Christian church. In this epistle, written to the founders of the church in Rome, he sets out some of his ideas on the importance of faith in overcoming mankind's innate sinfulness and in obtaining redemption. With an introduction by Ruth Rendell
Read More

Author: H.H. Scullard

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1317709640

Category: History

Page: 576

View: 7290

This definitive study from the author of From the Gracchi to Nero, examines the period from the foundation of Rome to the fall of Carthage. An accessible introduction to these centuries of change, this book will also be useful as context for those studying later developments in Roman history.
Read More

From Prehistory to the First Punic War

Author: Gary Forsythe

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN: 9780520249912

Category: History

Page: 400

View: 1014

Traces the history of early Rome, covering such topics as religion, language, and culture.
Read More

Author: Mary Beard

Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company

ISBN: 1631491253

Category: History

Page: 512

View: 6038

A sweeping, revisionist history of the Roman Empire from one of our foremost classicists. Ancient Rome was an imposing city even by modern standards, a sprawling imperial metropolis of more than a million inhabitants, a "mixture of luxury and filth, liberty and exploitation, civic pride and murderous civil war" that served as the seat of power for an empire that spanned from Spain to Syria. Yet how did all this emerge from what was once an insignificant village in central Italy? In S.P.Q.R., world-renowned classicist Mary Beard narrates the unprecedented rise of a civilization that even two thousand years later still shapes many of our most fundamental assumptions about power, citizenship, responsibility, political violence, empire, luxury, and beauty. From the foundational myth of Romulus and Remus to 212 ce—nearly a thousand years later—when the emperor Caracalla gave Roman citizenship to every free inhabitant of the empire, S.P.Q.R. (the abbreviation of "The Senate and People of Rome") examines not just how we think of ancient Rome but challenges the comfortable historical perspectives that have existed for centuries by exploring how the Romans thought of themselves: how they challenged the idea of imperial rule, how they responded to terrorism and revolution, and how they invented a new idea of citizenship and nation. Opening the book in 63 bce with the famous clash between the populist aristocrat Catiline and Cicero, the renowned politician and orator, Beard animates this “terrorist conspiracy,” which was aimed at the very heart of the Republic, demonstrating how this singular event would presage the struggle between democracy and autocracy that would come to define much of Rome’s subsequent history. Illustrating how a classical democracy yielded to a self-confident and self-critical empire, S.P.Q.R. reintroduces us, though in a wholly different way, to famous and familiar characters—Hannibal, Julius Caesar, Cleopatra, Augustus, and Nero, among others—while expanding the historical aperture to include those overlooked in traditional histories: the women, the slaves and ex-slaves, conspirators, and those on the losing side of Rome’s glorious conquests. Like the best detectives, Beard sifts fact from fiction, myth and propaganda from historical record, refusing either simple admiration or blanket condemnation. Far from being frozen in marble, Roman history, she shows, is constantly being revised and rewritten as our knowledge expands. Indeed, our perceptions of ancient Rome have changed dramatically over the last fifty years, and S.P.Q.R., with its nuanced attention to class inequality, democratic struggles, and the lives of entire groups of people omitted from the historical narrative for centuries, promises to shape our view of Roman history for decades to come.
Read More

Author: Clifford Ando

Publisher: University of Pennsylvania Press

ISBN: 0812204883

Category: History

Page: 184

View: 3189

The Romans depicted the civil law as a body of rules crafted through communal deliberation for the purpose of self-government. Yet, as Clifford Ando demonstrates in Law, Language, and Empire in the Roman Tradition, the civil law was also an instrument of empire: many of its most characteristic features developed in response to the challenges posed when the legal system of Rome was deployed to embrace, incorporate, and govern people and cultures far afield. Ando studies the processes through which lawyers at Rome grappled with the legal pluralism resulting from imperial conquests. He focuses primarily on the tools—most prominently analogy and fiction—used to extend the system and enable it to regulate the lives of persons far from the minds of the original legislators, and he traces the central place that philosophy of language came to occupy in Roman legal thought. In the second part of the book Ando examines the relationship between civil, public, and international law. Despite the prominence accorded public and international law in legal theory, it was civil law that provided conceptual resources to those other fields in the Roman tradition. Ultimately it was the civil law's implication in systems of domination outside its own narrow sphere that opened the door to its own subversion. When political turmoil at Rome upended the institutions of political and legislative authority and effectively ended Roman democracy, the concepts and language that the civil law supplied to the project of Republican empire saw their meanings transformed. As a result, forms of domination once exercised by Romans over others were inscribed in the workings of law at Rome, henceforth to be exercised by the Romans over themselves.
Read More