Roman Legal Heritage in European Culture

Author: Laurent Waelkens

Publisher: Leuven University Press

ISBN: 9462700540

Category: Law

Page: 424

View: 2188

Introduction to the history of Roman law and its institutions Throughout its history, Europe has been influenced by Roman culture, a culture with a strong sense of society and highly legal-minded. Hence, Roman law is of major importance in European thinking. It was the first subject to be taught at university and it remains tightly interwoven with all layers of European civilisation. This book provides an introduction to the history of Roman law and its institutions, as they developed from Antiquity until the nineteenth century. Concepts such as fundamental rights and freedoms, lawsuits, family law, rightsin rem, and obligations have their origins in classical Antiquity and were developed further throughout European history. The historical processing of our Roman legal heritage is treated from the perspective of comparative legal history. The book is written for undergraduate law students, but is also relevant for scholars from other disciplines.
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In Usum Scholarum. Ad Novissimam Heynii Editionem Exactus, Excisis Disquitionibus, Excursibus, Et Notarum Iis, Quae Ad Juniorum Commoditatem Minus Pertinere Videbantur

Author: Virgil

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category:

Page: 700

View: 2623

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An Introduction

Author: Rafael Domingo

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1351111450

Category: History

Page: 238

View: 9514

Roman Law: An Introduction offers a clear and accessible introduction to Roman law for students of any legal tradition. In the thousand years between the Law of the Twelve Tables and Justinian’s massive Codification, the Romans developed the most sophisticated and comprehensive secular legal system of Antiquity, which remains at the heart of the civil law tradition of Europe, Latin America, and some countries of Asia and Africa. Roman lawyers created new legal concepts, ideas, rules, and mechanisms that most Western legal systems still apply. The study of Roman law thus facilitates understanding among people of different cultures by inspiring a kind of legal common sense and breadth of knowledge. Based on over twenty-five years’ experience teaching Roman law, this volume offers a comprehensive examination of the subject, as well as a historical introduction which contextualizes the Roman legal system for students who have no familiarity with Latin or knowledge of Roman history. More than a compilation of legal facts, the book captures the defining characteristics and principal achievements of Roman legal culture through a millennium of development.
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Author: Sarah Worthington,Andrew Robertson,Graham Virgo

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN: 1509913262

Category: Law

Page: 336

View: 1943

The development of private law across the common law world is typically portrayed as a series of incremental steps, each one delivered as a result of judges dealing with marginally different factual circumstances presented to them for determination. This is said to be the common law method. According to this process, change might be assumed to be gradual, almost imperceptible. If this were true, however, then even Darwinian-style evolution – which is subject to major change-inducing pressures, such as the death of the dinosaurs – would seem unlikely in the law, and radical and revolutionary paradigms shifts perhaps impossible. And yet the history of the common law is to the contrary. The legal landscape is littered with quite remarkable revolutionary and evolutionary changes in the shape of the common law. The essays in this volume explore some of the highlights in this fascinating revolutionary and evolutionary development of private law. The contributors expose the nature of the changes undergone and their significance for the future direction of travel. They identify the circumstances and the contexts which might have provided an impetus for these significant changes. The essays range across all areas of private law, including contract, tort, unjust enrichment and property. No area has been immune from development. That fact itself is unsurprising, but an extended examination of the particular circumstances and contexts which delivered some of private law's most important developments has its own special significance for what it might indicate about the shape, and the shaping, of private law regimes in the future.
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Property and Ownership

Author: Georgy Kantor,Hannah Skoda,Tom Lambert

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0198813414

Category: Law

Page: 304

View: 7648

In this volume, ownership is defined as the simple fact of being able to describe something as 'mine' or 'yours', and property is distinguished as the discursive field which allows the articulation of attendant rights, relationships, and obligations. Property is often articulated through legalism as a way of thinking that appeals to rules and to generalizing concepts as a way of understanding, responding to, and managing the world around one. An Aristotelian perspective suggests that ownership is the natural state of things and a prerequisite of a true sense of self. An alternative perspective from legal theory puts law at the heart of the origins of property. However, both these points of view are problematic in a wider context, the latter because it rests heavily on Roman law. Anthropological and historical studies enable us to interrogate these assumptions. The articles here, ranging from Roman provinces to modern-day piracy in Somalia, address questions such as: How are legal property regimes intertwined with economic, moral-ethical, and political prerogatives? How far do the assumptions of the western philosophical tradition explain property and ownership in other societies? Is the 'bundle of rights' a useful way to think about property? How does legalism negotiate property relationships and interests between communities and individuals? How does the legalism of property respond to the temporalities and materialities of the objects owned? How are property regimes managed by states, and what kinds of conflicts are thus generated? Property and ownership cannot be reduced to natural rights, nor do they straightforwardly reflect power relations: the rules through which property is articulated tend to be conceptually subtle. As the fourth volume in the Legalism series, this collection draws on common themes that run throughout the first three volumes: Legalism: Anthropology and History, Legalism: Community and Justice, and Legalism: Rules and Categories consolidating them in a framework that suggests a new approach to legal concepts.
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selections from the Commentarii of Pope Pius II

Author: Pope Pius II,Andrew Hutchinson

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Foreign Language Study

Page: 148

View: 6115

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Ed. novissima

Author: N.A

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Saints

Page: N.A

View: 5773

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Aeneidos liber 5 - 8

Author: Publius Vergilius Maro

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category:

Page: 490

View: 1622

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Aeneidos l. VII - XII. carmina minora quae vulgo Virgilio adscribuntur et indicem rerum in commentario expositarum continens

Author: Publius Vergilius Maro

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category:

Page: 688

View: 6406

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