Seventeen Centuries on the Road from Center Place, Second Edition

Author: David E. Stuart

Publisher: UNM Press

ISBN: 0826354793

Category: History

Page: 344

View: 2157

At the height of their power in the late eleventh century, the Chaco Anasazi dominated a territory in the American Southwest larger than any European principality of the time. Developed over the course of centuries and thriving for over two hundred years, the Chacoans’ society collapsed dramatically in the twelfth century in a mere forty years. David E. Stuart incorporates extensive new research findings through groundbreaking archaeology to explore the rise and fall of the Chaco Anasazi and how it parallels patterns throughout modern societies in this new edition. Adding new research findings on caloric flows in prehistoric times and investigating the evolutionary dynamics induced by these forces as well as exploring the consequences of an increasingly detached central Chacoan decision-making structure, Stuart argues that Chaco’s failure was a failure to adapt to the consequences of rapid growth—including problems with the misuse of farmland, malnutrition, loss of community, and inability to deal with climatic catastrophe. Have modern societies learned from the experience and fate of the Chaco Anasazi, or are we risking a similar cultural collapse?
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Author: Jennifer C. Ross,Sharon R. Steadman

Publisher: Taylor & Francis

ISBN: 1315305623

Category: HISTORY

Page: 440

View: 4963

Ancient Complex Societies examines the archaeological evidence for the rise and functioning of politically and socially “complex” cultures in antiquity. Particular focus is given to civilizations exhibiting positions of leadership, social and administrative hierarchies, emerging and already developed complex religious systems, and economic differentiation. Case studies are drawn from around the globe, including Asia, the Mediterranean region, and the American continents. Using case studies from Africa, Polynesia, and North America, discussion is dedicated to identifying what “complex” means and when it should be applied to ancient systems. Each chapter attempts to not only explore the sociopolitical and economic elements of ancient civilizations, but to also present an overview of what life was like for the later population within each system, sometimes drilling down to individual people living their daily lives. Throughout the chapters, the authors address problems with the idea of complexity, the incomparability of cultures, and the inconsistency of archaeological and historical evidence in reconstructing ancient cultures.
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Archaeology and Efficiency

Author: David E. Stuart

Publisher: UNM Press

ISBN: 0826349129

Category: Social Science

Page: 168

View: 2352

This lively overview of the archaeology of northern New Mexico's Pajarito Plateau argues that Bandelier National Monument and the Pajarito Plateau became the Southwest's most densely populated and important upland ecological preserve when the great regional society centered on Chaco Canyon collapsed in the twelfth century. Some of Chaco's survivors moved southeast to the then thinly populated Pajarito Plateau, where they were able to survive by fundamentally refashioning their society. David E. Stuart, an anthropologist/archaeologist known for his stimulating overviews of prehistoric settlement and subsistence data, argues here that this re-creation of ancestral Puebloan society required a fundamental rebalancing of the Chacoan model. Where Chaco was based on growth, grandeur, and stratification, the socioeconomic structure of Bandelier was characterized by efficiency, moderation, and practicality. Although Stuart's focus is on the archaeology of Bandelier and the surrounding area, his attention to events that predate those sites by several centuries and at substantial distances from the modern monument is instructive. Beginning with Paleo-Indian hunter-gatherers and ending with the large villages and great craftsmen of the mid-sixteenth century, Stuart presents Bandelier as a society that, in crisis, relearned from its pre-Chacoan predecessors how to survive through creative efficiencies. Illustrated with previously unpublished maps supported by the most recent survey data, this book is indispensable for anyone interested in southwestern archaeology.
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Author: Robert R. McCoy,Steven M. Fountain

Publisher: ABC-CLIO

ISBN: 0313386838

Category: Social Science

Page: 257

View: 6179

A comprehensive look at the entirety of Native American history, focusing particularly on native peoples within the geographic boundaries of the United States. • Provides readers with a synopsis of the most current findings on the prehistory of American Indians • Creates a comprehensive narrative of American Indian history • Presents extensive coverage of the history of the American West and Pacific Northwest • Addresses topics that are often overlooked in other narratives, such as the American Indian's role in the Civil War • Covers contemporary American Indian life and culture
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Discoveries Among the Navajo and Hopi

Author: Edward Twitchell Hall

Publisher: Doubleday Books

ISBN: N.A

Category: History

Page: 187

View: 7623

An anthropologist shares his impressions of the frugal, pueblo-dwelling Hopi and the proud Navajos, revealing the deeply human logic of both tribes
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Author: David Roberts

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN: 9781439127230

Category: History

Page: 272

View: 5481

An exuberant, hands-on fly-on-the-wall account that combines the thrill of canyoneering and rock climbing with the intellectual sleuthing of archaeology to explore the Anasazi. David Roberts describes the culture of the Anasazi—the name means “enemy ancestors” in Navajo—who once inhabited the Colorado Plateau and whose modern descendants are the Hopi Indians of Arizona. Archaeologists, Roberts writes, have been puzzling over the Anasazi for more than a century, trying to determine the environmental and cultural stresses that caused their society to collapse 700 years ago. He guides us through controversies in the historical record, among them the haunting question of whether the Anasazi committed acts of cannibalism. Roberts’s book is full of up-to-date thinking on the culture of the ancient people who lived in the harsh desert country of the Southwest.
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Author: Stephen H. Lekson

Publisher: School for Advanced Research on the

ISBN: N.A

Category: History

Page: 439

View: 1380

According to archaeologist Stephen H. Lekson, much of what we think we know about the Southwest has been compressed into conventions and classifications and orthodoxies. This book challenges and reconfigures these accepted notions by telling two parallel stories, one about the development, personalities, and institutions of Southwestern archaeology and the other about interpretations of what actually happened in the ancient past. While many works would have us believe that nothing much ever happened in the ancient Southwest, this book argues that the region experienced rises and falls, kings and commoners, war and peace, triumphs and failures. In this view, Chaco Canyon was a geopolitical reaction to the "Colonial Period" Hohokam expansion and the Hohokam "Classic Period" was the product of refugee Chacoan nobles, chased off the Colorado Plateau by angry farmers. Far to the south, Casas Grandes was a failed attempt to create a Mesoamerican state, and modern Pueblo people--with societies so different from those at Chaco and Casas Grandes--deliberately rejected these monumental, hierarchical episodes of their past. From the publisher: The second printing of A History of the Ancient Southwest has corrected the errors noted below. SAR Press regrets an error on Page 72, paragraph 4 (also Page 275, note 2) regarding "absolute dates." "50,000 dates" was incorrectly published as "half a million dates." Also P. 125, lines 13-14: "Between 21,000 and 27,000 people lived there" should read "Between 2,100 and 2,700 people lived there."
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How Societies Choose to Fail or Survive

Author: Jared Diamond

Publisher: Penguin UK

ISBN: 0141976969

Category: History

Page: 608

View: 5828

From the author of Guns, Germs and Steel, Jared Diamond's Collapse: How Societies Choose to Fail or Survive is a visionary study of the mysterious downfall of past civilizations. Now in a revised edition with a new afterword, Jared Diamond's Collapse uncovers the secret behind why some societies flourish, while others founder - and what this means for our future. What happened to the people who made the forlorn long-abandoned statues of Easter Island? What happened to the architects of the crumbling Maya pyramids? Will we go the same way, our skyscrapers one day standing derelict and overgrown like the temples at Angkor Wat? Bringing together new evidence from a startling range of sources and piecing together the myriad influences, from climate to culture, that make societies self-destruct, Jared Diamond's Collapse also shows how - unlike our ancestors - we can benefit from our knowledge of the past and learn to be survivors. 'A grand sweep from a master storyteller of the human race' Daily Mail 'Riveting, superb, terrifying' Observer 'Gripping ... the book fulfils its huge ambition, and Diamond is the only man who could have written it' Economist 'This book shines like all Diamond's work' Sunday Times Jared Diamond (b. 1937) is Professor of Geography at the University of California, Los Angeles. Until recently he was Professor of Physiology at the UCLA School of Medicine. He is the Pulitzer Prize-winning author of the widely acclaimed Guns, Germs, and Steel: the Fates of Human Societies, which also is the winner of Britain's 1998 Rhone-Poulenc Science Book Prize.
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Zone of tolerance

Author: David E. Stuart

Publisher: UNM Press

ISBN: 9780826338280

Category: History

Page: 296

View: 9045

A sequel to Stuart's "The Guaymas Chronicles," this features Guaymas, Mexico's, red light district in the 1970s and the complex characters who inhabit it.
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The Ancient Pueblo Landscapes of the American Southwest

Author: V. B. Price,Baker H. Morrow

Publisher: UNM Press

ISBN: 9780826338600

Category: Architecture

Page: 217

View: 3272

A new look at Puebloan landscaping techniques and uses of plants and how they can influence modern architects in the Southwest.
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Secularism and the Study of Pueblo Religion

Author: Severin M. Fowles

Publisher: School for Advanced Research on the

ISBN: 9781934691564

Category: Social Science

Page: 306

View: 1363

"There is an unsettling paradox in the anthropology of religion. Modern understandings of "religion" emerged out of a specifically Western genealogy, and recognizing this, many anthropologists have become deeply suspicious of claims that such understandings can be applied with fidelity to premodern or non-Western contexts. And yet, archaeologists now write about "religion" and "ritual" with greater ease than ever, even though their deeply premodern and fully non-Western objects of study would seem to make the use of these concepts especially fraught. In this probing study, Severin Fowles challenges us to consider just what is at stake in archaeological reconstructions of an enchanted past. Focusing on the Ancestral Pueblo societies of the American Southwest, he provocatively argues that the Pueblos--prior to missionization--did not have a religion at all, but rather something else, something glossed in the indigenous vernacular as "doings." Fowles then outlines a new archaeology of doings that takes us far beyond the familiar terrain of premodern religion."--Publisher's website.
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Climate Change and the Future of the American Southwest

Author: William Debuys

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0199974675

Category: Science

Page: 369

View: 9431

With its soaring azure sky and stark landscapes, the American Southwest is one of the most hauntingly beautiful regions on earth. Yet staggering population growth, combined with the intensifying effects of climate change, is driving the oasis-based society close to the brink of a Dust-Bowl-scale catastrophe. In A Great Aridness, William deBuys paints a compelling picture of what the Southwest might look like when the heat turns up and the water runs out. This semi-arid land, vulnerable to water shortages, rising temperatures, wildfires, and a host of other environmental challenges, is poised to bear the heaviest consequences of global environmental change in the United States. Examining interrelated factors such as vanishing wildlife, forest die backs, and the over-allocation of the already stressed Colorado River--upon which nearly 30 million people depend--the author narrates the landscape's history--and future. He tells the inspiring stories of the climatologists and others who are helping untangle the complex, interlocking causes and effects of global warming. And while the fate of this region may seem at first blush to be of merely local interest, what happens in the Southwest, deBuys suggests, will provide a glimpse of what other mid-latitude arid lands worldwide--the Mediterranean Basin, southern Africa, and the Middle East--will experience in the coming years. Written with an elegance that recalls the prose of John McPhee and Wallace Stegner, A Great Aridness offers an unflinching look at the dramatic effects of climate change occurring right now in our own backyard.
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Book I of the Anasazi Mysteries

Author: Kathleen O'Neal Gear,W. Michael Gear

Publisher: Forge Books

ISBN: 1466823577

Category: Fiction

Page: 384

View: 2599

With their bestselling First North Americans series, the Gears have astounded an avid international audience of millions. Now these master storytellers turn to the American Southwest, to one of the most enigmatic people to ever inhabit this continent—the Anasazi. At its pinnacle in A.D. 1150, their empire was vast and sophisticated, unequalled until the arrival of the Europeans—and then they simply disappeared. Dr. Maureen Cole, one of the world's foremost physical anthropologists, is called in to examine and evaluate a mass grave discovered in New Mexico. The burial site contains nothing but the shatttered skulls of women and children. As Dr. Cole works to unravel the mystery of these deaths, strange things begin to happen around her. The walls of her laboratory crumble, her generator quits, and she begins to hear whispering voices emanating from the plastic bags of bones.... The Visitant is the first book in the Anasazi Mysteries series, which marked the beginning of an exciting new direction for the Gears—one sure to appeal to the Gears's large and dedicated following as well as fans of Tony Hillerman's Native American mysteries. At the Publisher's request, this title is being sold without Digital Rights Management Software (DRM) applied.
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Author: Mónica Díaz

Publisher: University of New Mexico Press

ISBN: 0826357741

Category: History

Page: 296

View: 6800

The conquest and colonization of the Americas imposed new social, legal, and cultural categories upon vast and varied populations of indigenous people. The colonizers’ intent was to homogenize these cultures and make all of them “Indian.” The creation of those new identities is the subject of the essays collected in Díaz’s To Be Indio in Colonial Spanish America. Focusing on central Mexico and the Andes (colonial New Spain and Peru), the contributors deepen scholarly knowledge of colonial history and literature, emphasizing the different ways people became and lived their lives as “indios.” While the construction of indigenous identities has been a theme of considerable interest among Latin Americanists since the early 1990s, this book presents new archival research and interpretive thinking, offering new material and a new approach to the subject to both scholars of colonial Peru and central Mexico.
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an eleventh-century Pueblo regional center

Author: Stephen H. Lekson

Publisher: School for Advanced Research on the

ISBN: N.A

Category: History

Page: 540

View: 2504

The site of a great Ancestral Pueblo center in the 11th and 12th centuries AD, the ruins in Chaco Canyon look like a city to some archaeologists, a ceremonial center to others. Chaco and the people who created its monumental great houses, extensive roads, and network of outlying settlements remain an enigma in American archaeology, although all agree they were exceptional in Southwestern prehistory. In this capstone volume, the contributors address central archaeological themes, including environment, organization of production, architecture, regional issues, and society and polity.They place Chaco in its time and in its region, considering what came before and after its heyday and its neighbors to the north and south, including Mesoamerica.
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An Individual's Search for Meaning

Author: Yi-fu Tuan

Publisher: George F Thompson

ISBN: 9780983497813

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 181

View: 2402

For more than fifty years, Yi-Fu Tuan has carried the study of humanistic geography--what John K. Wright early in the twentieth century called geosophy, a blending of geography and philosophy--to new heights, offering with each new book a fresh and often unique intellectual introspection into the human condition. His latest book, Humanist Geography, is a testament of all that he has learned and encountered as a geographer. In returning to and reappraising his previous books, Tuan emphasizes how the study of humanist geography can offer a younger generation of students, scholars, and teachers a path toward self-discovery, personal fulfillment, and even enlightenment. He argues that in the study of place can be found the wonders of the human mind and imagination, especially as understood by the senses, even as we human beings deal with nature's stringencies and our own deep flaws.
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Life with the Navajos in Chaco Canyon

Author: Marietta Wetherill

Publisher: UNM Press

ISBN: 9780826318206

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 241

View: 2830

First published in 1992 and now available only from the University of New Mexico Press, this is a firsthand account of life at a famous archaeological ruin. Married to Richard Wetherill, the rancher and amateur archaeologist who ran a trading post in Chaco Canyon from 1896 until he was murdered by a Navajo in 1910, Marietta Wetherill got to know her Navajo neighbors as intimately as an Anglo could. While Richard was excavating at Pueblo Bonito, Marietta managed the trading post. She befriended a singer who adopted her into his clan and gave her a close-up view of Navajo medicine and religion.
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ACTIVE LEARNING IN THE UNIVERSITY CLASSROOM

Author: Heather Burke,Claire Smith

Publisher: Left Coast Press

ISBN: 1598742574

Category: Education

Page: 288

View: 464

This book presents novel and interesting ways of teaching archaeological concepts and processes to college and university students. Seeking alternatives to the formal lecture format, the various contributions seek better ways of communicating the complexities of human behavior and of engaging students in active learning about the past. This collection of imaginative exercises designed by 20 master instructors on three continents includes role-playing, games, simulations, activities, and performance, all designed to teach archaeological concepts in interesting and engaging ways.
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Exploring the Ancient Ruins of the Greater American Southwest

Author: Beth Sagstetter,Bill Sagstetter

Publisher: Benchmark Publishing (Company)

ISBN: 9780964582422

Category: Archaeology and history

Page: 360

View: 7196

This book is intended as an introduction to Southwestern Archaeology, for casual visitors. The book will guide you around a site in Sherlock Holmes fashion, giving you very real tools for understanding cliff dwellings. The Cliff Dwellings Speak also introduces readers to the descendants of the cliff dwellers -- the Pueblo people of the Southwest who still live there today. The book is highly illustrated with black and white photographs and engravings from rare antique books. Using copious illustrations, Field Guides in some chapters show the reader what to look for, and what it might mean. The Cliff Dwellings Speak is unique and is very different from any other book regarding understanding the Greater American Southwest (views of Native American, Anasazi, ruins at Mesa Verde, Colorado; landscape images of Colorado).
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