Author: Jeff A. Benner

Publisher: Jeff A. Benner

ISBN: 1602643776

Category: Foreign Language Study

Page: 212

View: 6450

Whether you know Hebrew or not, this book will provide you with a quick reference resource for learning the meaning of many Hebrew words that lie beneath the English translations, which will open new doors for you into Biblical interpretation. The Hebrew language of the Bible must be understood from its original and Ancient Hebrew perspective. Our interpretation of a word like "holy" is an abstract idea, derived out of a Greco-Roman culture and mindset, which is usually understood as someone or something that is especially godly, pious or spiritual. However, the Hebrew word (qadosh) means, from an Ancient Hebrew perspective, unique and is defined in this dictionary as: "Someone or something that has, or has been given the quality of specialness, and has been separated from the rest for a special purpose." With this interpretation, we discover that the nation of Israel is not "holy," in the sense of godliness or piety, but is a unique and special people, separated from all others to serve God. This Biblical Hebrew dictionary contains the one thousand most frequent verbs and nouns found within the Hebrew Bible. Each word is translated and defined from its original concrete Ancient Hebrew perspective, allowing for a more accurate interpretation of the text. In addition to the one thousand verbs and nouns, the appendices in the book include a complete list of Hebrew pronouns, prepositions, adverbs, conjunctions and numbers."
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Ancient Hebrew Dictionary

Author: Virtual Book Worm Publishing

Publisher: Bukupedia

ISBN: N.A

Category:

Page: 206

View: 4775

This book has been designed to be a quick reference guide for looking up the meaning of common Hebrew words found in the Hebrew Bible, as well as a resource for learning the Hebrew vocabulary. Within this book is a list of the 1000 most frequently used Hebrew verbs (379) and nouns (621) from the Hebrew Bible. Each word entry includes: 1. The Hebrew word (in modern and ancient script). 2. A transliteration of the Hebrew word. 3. A one or two word translation of the Hebrew word. 4. A more detailed definition of the Hebrew word. 5. Cross references to other resources. In the appendices are additional words and details about the Hebrew language including: 1. The Hebrew alphabet and vowels. 2. Hebrew prefixes and suffixes. 3. Pronouns, prepositions, etc. Ancient Hebrew Dictionary 4. Hebrew numbers. 5. Hebrew verb conjugations. Dictionary Format Below is an example entry, followed by an explanation of its contents. שָׁלוֹם . 944 /  / sha-lom Translation:+Completeness Definition:+Something that has been finished or made whole. A state of being complete. AHLB:+2845 (c) Strong's:+7965 Modern Hebrew Word Following the entry number is the Hebrew word written in the Modern Hebrew script ( .(שָׁלוֹם Ancient Hebrew Word Each word is also written in the ancient pictographic script (). In some cases, this spelling may be different than the modern script. As an example, the word #390 ) אֹהֶל ) includes the hholam vowel pointing (the dot above the aleph representing the "o" sound), but in most ancient documents this word is written as אוהל (where the letter vav represents the “o” sound) or  in the ancient script. In addition, the spelling of words evolve over time. For instance, the word בּוֹר (#452, bor, a cistern) comes from the root כור (kor) meaning Introduction "to dig a hole." Therefore, the ancient spelling of this word would have been  (kor). Transliteration A transliteration from Hebrew into Roman letters (sha-lom) is given to assist with the pronunciation of Hebrew nouns. Verb transliterations will be represented by the consonants only. For instance, the transliteration for the Hebrew verb בדל (#20) is B.D.L. Translation This is one or two English words that best translate the Hebrew word. In many cases, this translation will be significantly different from what is found in other dictionaries. For instance, the word שָׁלוֹם is usually translated as "peace," but this abstract idea does not completely convey the original Hebraic meaning of this word. In this dictionary, the translation of this word is “Completeness.” An index at the end of this book allows for a cross referencing from the English translation to its corresponding entry within this dictionary. Definition This is a more specific meaning of the word which reflects its textual and original Hebraic cultural perspective. As an example, in our culture, the word "peace" means "a state of mutual harmony between people or groups." However, in Biblical Hebrew, this word means "a state of being complete." Ancient Hebrew Dictionary 10 Cross References Each entry includes a cross reference to the Ancient Hebrew Lexicon of the Bible and Strong's Dictionary. An index at the end of this book allows for a cross referencing from Strong's number to its corresponding entry within this dictionary.
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Author: Jeff A. Benner

Publisher: Jeff A. Benner

ISBN: 1589397762

Category: Foreign Language Study

Page: 616

View: 1912

All previous Biblical Hebrew lexicons have provided a modern western definition and perspective to Hebrew roots and words. This prevents the reader of the Bible from seeing the ancient authors' original intent of the passages. This is the first Biblical Hebrew lexicon that defines each Hebrew word within its original Ancient Hebrew cultural meaning. One of the major differences between the Modern Western mind and the Ancient Hebrew's is that their mind related all words and their meanings to a concrete concept. For instance, the Hebrew word "chai" is normally translated as "life", a western abstract meaning, but the original Hebrew concrete meaning of this word is the "stomach". In the Ancient Hebrew mind, a full stomach is a sign of a full "life". The Hebrew language is a root system oriented language and the lexicon is divided into sections reflecting this root system. Each word of the Hebrew Bible is grouped within its roots and is defined according to its original ancient cultural meaning. Also included in each word entry are its alternative spellings, King James translations of the word and Strong's number. Indexes are included to assist with finding a word within the lexicon according to its spelling, definition, King James translation or Strong's number.
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Based on the Commentaries of Rabbi Samson Raphael Hirsch

Author: Matityahu Clark,Samson Raphael Hirsch

Publisher: Feldheim Publishers

ISBN: 9781583304310

Category: Foreign Language Study

Page: 330

View: 9682

This dictionary, based on the commentaries of Rabbi Samson Raphael Hirsch, is a monumental work and guide to understanding the Biblical commentary of Rabbi Hirsch. This work analyzes the deep concepts inherent in Hebrew, the Divine language, revealing how every word's root contains connotations essential to a greater understanding of Torah.
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Author: Jeff A. Benner

Publisher: Virtualbookworm.com Publishing

ISBN: 9781602645943

Category: Religion

Page: 354

View: 4557

The first five books of the Hebrew Bible, called the Torah, are the foundation to the rest of the Bible. With this edition, the Torah can be read and studied through the original pictographic script from the time of Abraham and Moses. Each letter in this ancient script is a picture, where each picture represents a concrete idea.
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Understanding the Ancient Hebrew Language of the Bible Based on Ancient Hebrew Culture and Thought

Author: Jeff A. Benner

Publisher: St. Martin's Press

ISBN: 9781589395343

Category: Foreign Language Study

Page: 228

View: 2899

The Hebrew Bible, called the "Tenach" by Jews and "Old Testament" by Christians, was originally written in the Hebrew language using an ancient pictographic, or paleo-Hebrew, script. Through the study of this ancient language and script the words of the Bible will come alive to the reader in a way never seen before. When we read the Bible from our modern western perspective the original meanings of the words within the text are lost to us. Only by understanding these words in their original Hebraic context can we read the Bible through the eyes of the original authors. This book will examine the origins and history of the ancient Hebrew language and script and their close relationship to the culture of the ancient Hebrews. Included are detailed charts of the evolution of the ancient Hebrew script as well as many other related Semitic and non-Semitic scripts. Also included are the details of the root system of the Hebrew language, and a lexicon of ancient Hebrew roots to assist the reader of the Bible with finding the original cultural context for many Hebrew words.
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Author: Todd J. Murphy

Publisher: InterVarsity Press

ISBN: 9780830814589

Category: Foreign Language Study

Page: 183

View: 2700

Todd J. Murphy defines more than 2,000 terms of grammar, syntax, linguistics, textual criticism and Old Testament criticism that relate to--and often obscure--the study and discussion of biblical Hebrew.
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The Hebrew Text Literally Tranlated Word for Word

Author: Jeff A. Benner

Publisher: Jeff A. Benner

ISBN: 1602640335

Category: Foreign Language Study

Page: 452

View: 4297

While the original Biblical text was written from an Ancient Hebraic perspective, all modern translations of the Bible are written from our modern western perspective. This traditional approach to translation does allow for ease in reading but it erases the original Hebraic style and meaning of the text. In addition, translations take many liberties by removing, changing or adding words from the text in order to "fix" the text for the English reader. The Mechanical Translation is a new and unique style of translation that will reveal the Hebrew behind the English by translating the text very literally and faithfully to the original Hebrew text. A great tool for those interested in studying the Bible who have no Hebrew background as well as for those who are learning to read the Bible in its original Hebrew language. Features: . An introduction to the Hebrew language and grammar. . The Hebrew text from the Biblia Hebraica Leningradensia. . A literal word for word translation of the Hebrew text. . A revised translation for understandability in English. . A dictionary of words defined from an Hebraic perspective. . A concordance of all words found in the book of Genesis.
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Author: Jeff A. Benner

Publisher: Virtualbookworm Publishing

ISBN: 9781589394575

Category: Religion

Page: 132

View: 9246

When we read an English translation of the Bible we define the words within it according to our modern vocabulary allowing our culture and language to influence how we read and interpret the Bible. The Bible was written by ancient Hebrews whose culture and language was very different from our own and must be read and interpreted through their eyes. When we define the names of God using our culture and language we lose the Hebraic meanings behind the original Hebrew names of God. Consequently the true nature and character of God is hidden behind the veil of time and culture. By understanding the various names of God through the vocabulary and language of the ancient Hebrews, the nature and character of God is revealed to us in a new light. The prophet Zechariah described the character of God with the words "sh'mo ehhad" translated as His Name is One (Zechariah 14:9). This phrase beautifully describes the character of God from a Hebraic perspective that is lost to us through translation and unfamiliarity with ancient Hebrew culture.
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Author: Jeff A. Benner

Publisher: Virtualbookworm.com Publishing

ISBN: 9781602647497

Category: Foreign Language Study

Page: 130

View: 9211

Recent archeological and linguistic evidence reveals that the Jews of the New Testament era spoke Hebrew, not Greek as has been taught for so many years. With this revelation, we can conclude that the teachings of the New Testament were first conveyed, either in spoken or written form, in Hebrew, which means that the New Testament must be understood from a Hebraic perspective and not a Greek one. The first step in this process is to translate the Greek words of the New Testament into Hebrew. While translating the Greek words into Hebrew, may sound overwhelming for many, it is in fact, a very simple process that anyone can perform, even without any prior studies in Greek or Hebrew. All that is required is a Strong's Concordance and this book. This book lists the five hundred most frequent Greek words of the New Testament and provides their Hebrew translations and Hebraic definitions, with all Greek and Hebrew words cross-referenced with Strong's numbers.
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Author: Ernest Klein

Publisher: Carta the Isreal Map & Publishing Company Limited

ISBN: 9789652200938

Category: Foreign Language Study

Page: 721

View: 3087

A clear and concise work on the origins of Hebrew words and their sense development. Each of the c. 32,000 entries is first given in its Hebrew form, then translated into English and analyzed etymologically, using Latin transcription for all non-Latin scripts. This Etymological Dictionary of Biblical Hebrew is an indispensable source of biblical, Jewish, modern Hebrew and Near Eastern studies.,
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Read Hebrew in Living Color

Author: J. Steven Babbit

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9781439243428

Category: Religion

Page: 184

View: 9816

Unlocking the Ancient Hebrew Alphabet Code shows how to interpret many basic Hebrew words using the ancient pictographical meanings of the individual Hebrew letters. Each letter tells a story. Each combination of letters within a Hebrew word forms a picture-story unto itself.Biblical Hebrew was meant to be a living, pictographical language based on combinations of word pictures, each of which conveyed specific meanings. Once this system of word pictures is understood, Hebrew words come alive with nuances of meaning that no other language can match. A picture may equal a thousand words, but Hebrew words are beautifully alive with full-color picture meanings!
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Author: Daniel Quinn

Publisher: Steerforth

ISBN: 1581952392

Category: Fiction

Page: 432

View: 511

They knew us before we began to walk upright. Shamans called them guardians, mythmakers called them tricksters, pagans called them gods, churchmen called them demons, folklorists called them shape-shifters. They’ve obligingly taken any role we’ve assigned them, and, while needing nothing from us, have accepted whatever we thought was their due – love, hate, fear, worship, condemnation, neglect, oblivion. Even in modern times, when their existence is doubted or denied, they continue to extend invitations to those who would travel a different road, a road not found on any of our cultural maps. But now, perceiving us as a threat to life itself, they issue their invitations with a dark purpose of their own. In this dazzling metaphysical thriller, four who put themselves in the hands of these all-but-forgotten Others venture across a sinister American landscape hidden from normal view, finding their way to interlocking destinies of death, terror, transcendental rapture, and shattering enlightenment. From the Trade Paperback edition.
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A Guide to Learning the Hebrew Alphabet, Vocabulary and Sentence Structure of the Hebrew Bible

Author: Jeff A. Benner

Publisher: Jeff A. Benner

ISBN: 9781589395848

Category: Foreign Language Study

Page: 132

View: 8301

Anyone interested in learning to read the Hebrew Bible in its original language will find within the pages of this book all the resources needed to begin this wonderful journey. The book is laid out in four parts. The first part teaches the Hebrew alphabet through a series of lessons. The second part teaches word and sentence structure of the Hebrew language by breaking down each Hebrew word in Genesis chapter one, verses one through five. The Hebrew text of Genesis chapter one is provided for reading and comprehension practices in part three. The fourth part of the book contains charts and dictionaries of prefixes, suffixes, words and roots of the Hebrew language to assist the reader with vocabulary definitions and comprehension. Within a short amount of time the Hebrew student will soon be reading the Bible through the eyes of the author rather than the opinions of a translator. ABOUT THE AUTHOR Jeff Benner has had a long interest in the Hebrew language of the Bible and in 1996 he began researching the ancient pictographic alphabet used by the Hebrew people and other Semitic tribes. He has made many significant discoveries linking the ancient Hebrew culture with the ancient Hebrew language and alphabet. In 1999 Jeff founded the "Ancient Hebrew Research Center" to research and teach Biblical understanding through the alphabet and language to those with little or no Hebrew background. Jeff's current project is the Ancient Hebrew Lexicon of the Bible. This Lexicon defines Hebrew words of the Bible according to their cultural context revealing the original Hebraic meanings of Biblical passages and words.
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Author: Jeff Benner

Publisher: Jeff A. Benner

ISBN: 1602641145

Category: Religion

Page: 160

View: 2003

Reading a translation of any book is just not the same as reading it in its original language and is adequately stated in the phrase "lost in the translation." When-ever a text is translated from one language to another it loses some of its flavor and substance. The problem is compounded by the fact that a language is tied to the culture that uses that language. When the text is read by a culture different from the one it is written in, it loses its cultural context. A Biblical example of this can be found in the Hebrew word tsur which is translated as a rock - "He only is my rock and my salvation, he is my defence; I shall not be greatly moved" (Psalm 62:2, KJV). What is a rock and how does it apply to God? To us it may mean solid, heavy or hard but the cultural meaning of the word tsur is a high place in the rocks where one runs to for refuge and defense, a place of salvation. "The Living Words" is an in-depth study into the Ancient Hebrew vocabulary and culture of the Bible replacing the flavor and substance that has been removed from us.
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Author: David J. A. Clines

Publisher: Sheffield Phoenix Press

ISBN: N.A

Category: Foreign Language Study

Page: 999

View: 2547

"The Dictionary of Classical Hebrew is a completely new and innovative dictionary. Unlike previous dictionaries, which have been dictionaries of biblical Hebrew, it is the first dictionary of the classical Hebrew language to cover not only the biblical texts but also Ben Sira, the Dead Sea Scrolls and the Hebrew inscriptions.This Dictionary covers the period from the earliest times to 200 CE. It lists and analyses every occurrence of each Hebrew word that occurs in texts of that period, with an English translation of every Hebrew word and phrase cited. Among its special features are: a list of the non-biblical texts cited (especially the Dead Sea Scrolls), a word frequency index for each letter of the alphabet, a substantial bibliography (from Volume 2 onward) and an English-Hebrew index in each volume." -- Publisher description.
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Author: Shimeon Brisman

Publisher: KTAV Publishing House, Inc.

ISBN: 9780881256581

Category: Foreign Language Study

Page: 337

View: 3672

This volume, which constitutes the third in the series Jewish Research Literature, is divided into two parts. Part One offers detailed descriptions of the various Judaic dictionaries with biographical information on their compilers, beginning with Rav Saadiah Gaon's early tenth-century Egron and concluding with modern dictionaries compiled in recent years. Bibliographical lists and summaries, arranged chronologically according to date of publication, supplement the text. The narrative is written in nontechnical style, but technical information appears in the footnotes. Part Two, which deals with concordances, citation collections, proverbs, and folk sayings, will appear separately.
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Author: Thorleif Boman

Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company

ISBN: 9780393005349

Category: Philosophy

Page: 224

View: 2450

"Builds on the premise that language and thought are inevitably and inextricably bound up with each other. . . . A classic study of the differences between Greek and Hebrew thought."—John E. Rexrine, Colgate University
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