Author: Malcolm Laurence Cameron

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9780521405218

Category: History

Page: 211

View: 3820

The first book to study Old English medical texts.
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Author: Carol Braun Pasternack

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9780521465496

Category: History

Page: 219

View: 5279

The modern reader knows Old English poetry as a discrete number of poems, set up and printed in units punctuated as modern sentences, and with titles inserted by modern editors. Carol Braun Pasternack constructs a reading of the poetry that takes into account the format of the verse as it exists in the manuscripts. In a detailed analysis, which takes up issues current in poststructuralist theory, she argues that the idea of "verse sequences" should replace the "poem" and "implied tradition" should replace the idea of "the author".
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Author: Emily V. Thornbury

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1107051983

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 338

View: 1343

A groundbreaking study of pre-Conquest English poets that rethinks the social role of Anglo-Saxon verse.
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Author: Irina Dumitrescu

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1108416861

Category: Juvenile Nonfiction

Page: N.A

View: 694

Reveals the rich emotional experience of teaching and learning as revealed in Anglo-Saxon literature.
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Theology and Society in an Age of Faith

Author: Helen Foxhall Forbes

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1317123077

Category: History

Page: 410

View: 2183

Christian theology and religious belief were crucially important to Anglo-Saxon society, and are manifest in the surviving textual, visual and material evidence. This is the first full-length study investigating how Christian theology and religious beliefs permeated society and underpinned social values in early medieval England. The influence of the early medieval Church as an institution is widely acknowledged, but Christian theology itself is generally considered to have been accessible only to a small educated elite. This book shows that theology had a much greater and more significant impact than has been recognised. An examination of theology in its social context, and how it was bound up with local authorities and powers, reveals a much more subtle interpretation of secular processes, and shows how theological debate affected the ways that religious and lay individuals lived and died. This was not a one-way flow, however: this book also examines how social and cultural practices and interests affected the development of theology in Anglo-Saxon England, and how ’popular’ belief interacted with literary and academic traditions. Through case-studies, this book explores how theological debate and discussion affected the personal perspectives of Christian Anglo-Saxons, including where possible those who could not read. In all of these, it is clear that theology was not detached from society or from the experiences of lay people, but formed an essential constituent part.
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Author: Simon Keynes,Michael Lapidge,Andy Orchard

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9780521744980

Category: History

Page: 319

View: 5527

Published for the first time in paperback, Cambridge Studies in Anglo-Saxon England is a set of scholarly texts and monographs intended to advance our knowledge of all aspects of the field of Anglo-Saxon studies. The scope of the series, like that of Anglo-Saxon England, its periodical counterpart, embraces original scholarship in various disciplines: literary, historical, archaeological, philological, art-historical, palaeographical, architectural, liturgical and numismatic.
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Author: Richard North

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9780521551830

Category: History

Page: 374

View: 9146

Heathen gods are hard to find in Old English literature. Most Anglo-Saxon writers had no interest in them, and scholars today prefer to concentrate on the Christian civilization for which the Anglo-Saxons were so famous. Richard North offers an interesting view of Anglo-Saxon and Scandinavian paganism and mythology in the pre-Viking and Viking age. He discusses the pre-Christian gods of Bede's history of the Anglo-Saxon conversion with reference to an orgiastic figure known as Ingui, whom Bede called 'god of this age'. Using expert knowledge of comparative literary material from Old Norse-Icelandic and other Old Germanic languages, North reconstructs the slender Old English evidence in a highly imaginative treatment of poems such as Deor and The Dream of the Rood. Other gods such as Woden are considered with reference to Odin and his family in Old Norse-Icelandic mythology. In conclusion, it is argued that the cult of Ingui was defeated only when the ideology of the god Woden was sponsored by the Anglo-Saxon church. The book will interest students interested in Old English, Old Norse-Icelandic and Germanic literatures, Anglo-Saxon history and archaeology.
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Author: Katharine Scarfe Beckett

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9781139440905

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: N.A

View: 8498

In this book, Scarfe Beckett is concerned with representations of the Islamic world prevalent in Anglo-Saxon England. Using a wide variety of literary, historical and archaeological evidence, she argues that the first perceptions of Arabs, Ismaelites and Saracens which derived from Christian exegesis preconditioned wester expressions of hostility and superiority towards peoples of the Islamic world, and that these received ideas prevailed even as material contacts increased between England and Muslim territory. Medieval texts invariably represented Muslim Arabs as Saracens and Ismaelites (or Hagarenes), described by Jerome as biblical enemies of the Christian world three centuries before Muhammad's lifetime. Two early ideas in particular - that Saracens worshipped Venus and dissembled their own identity - continued into the early modern period. This finding has interesting implications for earlier theses by Edward Said and Norman Daniel concerning the history of English perceptions of Islam.
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Author: Maren Clegg Hyer

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 1786940280

Category: Anglo-Saxons

Page: 384

View: 9834

Water and the Environment in the Anglo-Saxon World, third volume of Daily Living in the Anglo-Saxon World, continues to introduce students of Anglo-Saxon culture to aspects of the realities of the environment that surrounded Anglo-Saxon peoples through reference to archaeological and textualsources. Similar in theme and method to the first and second volumes, the collected articles of Water and the Environment in the Anglo-Saxon World illuminate how an understanding of the impact of water features on the daily lives of the people and the environment of the Anglo-Saxon world can informreading and scholarship in Anglo-Saxon studies. In discussing fishing, for example, we might ask, in what ways did fish and fishing locations impact the life of the average person living in those areas within the period? How would it impact those persons' diets, livelihood, and religious obligations; how would fish impact the social and culturalstructures for those who lived near the water features of fishing?Study of the impact of water features on the daily lives of the people and the environment of the Anglo-Saxon world will assist serious students of the Anglo-Saxon period in both perceiving and understanding the imagery of material culture in the archaeology and textual materials of theperiod.
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Essays in Honour of Jefferey B. Russell

Author: Alberto Ferreiro,Jeffrey Burton Russell

Publisher: BRILL

ISBN: 9789004106109

Category: History

Page: 388

View: 9270

The study of heresy and heterodoxy and of belief in magic, witchcraft and the devil has in the past 25 years made significant advances in our understanding of art and iconography, ideas, mentality and belief, and ordinary life and popular imagination in the patristic and medieval periods. At the forefront of research into this aspect of medieval intellectual history has been Jeffrey B. Russell, whose numerous books and articles have opened important new paths in the field. To mark his retirement 17 established and emerging scholars from Europe and North America - historians of art, the church, religions, and ideas - have contributed papers on the many areas which Russell has influenced. Topics dealt with include elves, the Christians apocrypha, mysticism, sexuality, heresies and heresiologies, apocalyptic tracts, astrology, hell, and other Christian encounters with non-believers. These essays are offered as tribute to the deep impact that Russel has had on medieval studies. Contributors include: Alan Bernstein, Richard Emmerson, Alberto Ferreiro, Neil Forsyth, Abraham Friessen, Karen Jolly, Henry Ansgar Kelly, Richard Kieckhefer, Beverly M. Kienzle, Garry Macy, Bernard McGinn, Edward Peters, Cheryl Rigs, Larry J. Simon, Laura Smoller, Catherine B. Tkacz, and John Tolan.
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Matters of Belief, Health, Gender and Identity

Author: Alaric Hall

Publisher: Anglo-Saxon Studies

ISBN: 9781843835097

Category: History

Page: 238

View: 1056

Elves and elf-belief during the Anglo-Saxon period are reassessed in this lively and provocative study.
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Author: Alexandra Gillespie,Daniel Wakelin

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 0521889790

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 375

View: 8639

This book studies approaches to the production of manuscripts in medieval England, from the first commercial guilds to the advent of print.
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Author: David Pratt

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9781139463553

Category: History

Page: N.A

View: 8580

This book is a comprehensive study of political thought at the court of King Alfred the Great (871–99). It explains the extraordinary burst of royal learned activity focused on inventive translations from Latin into Old English attributed to Alfred's own authorship. A full exploration of context establishes these texts as part of a single discourse which placed Alfred himself at the heart of all rightful power and authority. A major theme is the relevance of Frankish and other European experiences, as sources of expertise and shared concerns, and for important contrasts with Alfredian thought and behaviour. Part I assesses Alfred's rule against West Saxon structures, showing the centrality of the royal household in the operation of power. Part II offers an intimate analysis of the royal texts, developing far-reaching implications for Alfredian kingship, communication and court culture. Comparative in approach, the book places Alfred's reign at the forefront of wider European trends in aristocratic life.
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Author: Tom Lambert

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 019878631X

Category:

Page: 416

View: 3638

Law and Order in Anglo-Saxon England explores English legal culture and practice across the Anglo-Saxon period, beginning with the essentially pre-Christian laws enshrined in writing by King AEthelberht of Kent in c. 600 and working forward to the Norman Conquest of 1066. It attempts to escape the traditional retrospective assumptions of legal history, focused on the late twelfth-century Common Law, and to establish a new interpretative framework for the subject, more sensitive to contemporary cultural assumptions and practical realities. The focus of the volume is on the maintenance of order: what constituted good order; what forms of wrongdoing were threatening to it; what roles kings, lords, communities, and individuals were expected to play in maintaining it; and how that worked in practice. Its core argument is that the Anglo-Saxons had a coherent, stable, and enduring legal order that lacks modern analogies: it was neither state-like nor stateless, and needs to be understood on its own terms rather than as a variant or hybrid of these models. Tom Lambert elucidates a distinctively early medieval understanding of the tension between the interests of individuals and communities, and a vision of how that tension ought to be managed that, strikingly, treats strongly libertarian and communitarian features as complementary. Potentially violent, honour-focused feuding was an integral aspect of legitimate legal practice throughout the period, but so too was fearsome punishment for forms of wrongdoing judged socially threatening. Law and Order in Anglo-Saxon England charts the development of kings' involvement in law, in terms both of their authority to legislate and their ability to influence local practice, presenting a picture of increasingly ambitious and effective royal legal innovation that relied more on the cooperation of local communal assemblies than kings' sparse and patchy network of administrative officials.
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Author: Mary Clayton,Hugh Magennis

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9780521433822

Category: History

Page: 239

View: 5369

An edition of two Old English versions of the colourful legend of St Margaret of Antioch.
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Early English Charms, Plant Lore, and Healing

Author: Stephen Pollington

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9781898281474

Category: History

Page: 539

View: 2224

A comprehensive and detailed examination of every aspect of the early English approach to illness and healing, including a full list of the plants used and the properties they contain. Other themes include witchcraft, magic and paganism and appendices present healing theories, amulets, causes of disease, charms, dreams, omens and tree-lore. Three key Old English texts are reproduced in full, accompanied by new translations: Bald's Third Leechbook , the Lacnunga Manuscript, and 'The Old English Herbarium' Manuscript 5. This is a fascinating work of reference, packed full of information and interesting details.
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Author: Richard Marsden

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1139643096

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: N.A

View: 619

This book is a major reader of Old English, the language spoken by the Anglo-Saxons before the Norman Conquest. Designed both for beginning and for more advanced students, it broke new ground in two ways, first in its range of texts, and second in the degree of annotation it offers. The fifty-six prose and verse texts include the established favourites such as The Battle of Maldon and King Alfred's Preface to his Pastoral Care, but also others which have not before been readily available, such as a complete Easter homily, Aelfric's life of Saint Aethelthryth and all forty-six Durham proverbs. Headnotes establish the literary and historical contexts for the works that are represented, and reflect the rich cultural variety of Anglo-Saxon England. Modern English word glosses and explanatory notes are provided on the same page as the text. Other features include a reference grammar and a comprehensive glossary.
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Author: Sally Crawford

Publisher: Sutton Publishing

ISBN: N.A

Category: History

Page: 198

View: 3213

The book includes a brief introduction to the study of childhood and family structure, this is followed by a discussion of the age at which an Anglo-Saxon child was thought to have become an adult.
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Author: Hugh Magennis

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 0521519470

Category: History

Page: 217

View: 5376

Introducing Anglo-Saxon literature in an approachable way, this is an indispensable guide for students to a key literary topic.
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