From Chavín to Inca

Author: Rebecca Stone

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9780500202869

Category: Andes Region

Page: 224

View: 5018

This is a study of the art and architecture created by the various cultures of the ancient Andes. The book examines the goldwork, intricate textiles, vast cities and tall pyramids that constitute one of the oldest artistic traditions in history which, although the Incas are famous as the masters of the largest empire in the Renaissance world, remains relatively little-known."
Read More

Author: Barbara Mauldin,Blair Clark

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9780890135273

Category: Art

Page: 303

View: 3933

With over four hundred color photographs, this book presents an overview of the religious, textile, costume, utilitarian, and festival folk arts made after the Andeans were free from Spanish colonial rule.
Read More

From Chavín to Inca

Author: Rebecca Stone

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9780500204153

Category: Art

Page: 248

View: 7453

This wide-ranging survey, now established as the best single-volume introduction to Andean art and architecture on the market today, describes the strikingly varied artistic achievements of the Chavín, Paracas, Moche, Nasca, Chimú and Inca cultures, among others. For this fully revised third edition, Rebecca Stone has rewritten and expanded the text throughout, touching on many of the recent discoveries and advances in the field. These include new work on the huge stone pyramids and other structures at Caral; continued excavations of Inca child sacrifices perched on mountaintops throughout the empire, with their perfectly preserved clothing and miniature offerings of metal, ceramics and shell; spectacular murals and the remarkable burial of a tattooed female warrior-leader at the Moche site of Huaca Cao Viejo; and many new finds of high-status textiles, along with fresh analyses of weaving technology and new interpretations of designs and motifs.
Read More

Andean Roots of Abstract Art

Author: César Paternosto

Publisher: University of Texas Press

ISBN: 9780292765658

Category: Art

Page: 272

View: 2253

"Shows that precolumbian tectonic forms (especially as found in sculpture and weaving) appear to be an overlooked source, or anticipation, of much of the art of the 20th century. Second part of book deals with artifacts as American art and addresses reception of ancient tectonics in the 20th century. Emphasizes intense relationship that some members of the New York School (particularly Barnett Newman and Adolph Gottlieb) had during 1940s with the aboriginal arts of the North American part of the hemisphere and thus the affinities between their work and the work of the older Torres Garcâia in Montevideo, at the other end of the continent"--Handbook of Latin American Studies, v. 58.
Read More

Author: Hugh Honour,John Fleming

Publisher: Laurence King Publishing

ISBN: 9781856694513

Category: Art

Page: 936

View: 2657

Expanded to include the latest discoveries in prehistoric art as well as the most recent developments in non-Western and modern art, this is an up-to-date and wide ranging history of art.
Read More

Themes and Variations from Prehistory to the Present

Author: Mary Strong

Publisher: University of Texas Press

ISBN: 0292742908

Category: Art

Page: 368

View: 9732

From prehistory to the present, the Indigenous peoples of the Andes have used a visual symbol system—that is, art—to express their sense of the sacred and its immanence in the natural world. Many visual motifs that originated prior to the Incas still appear in Andean art today, despite the onslaught of cultural disruption that native Andeans have endured over several centuries. Indeed, art has always been a unifying power through which Andeans maintain their spirituality, pride, and culture while resisting the oppression of the dominant society. In this book, Mary Strong takes a significantly new approach to Andean art that links prehistoric to contemporary forms through an ethnographic understanding of Indigenous Andean culture. In the first part of the book, she provides a broad historical survey of Andean art that explores how Andean religious concepts have been expressed in art and how artists have responded to cultural encounters and impositions, ranging from invasion and conquest to international labor migration and the internet. In the second part, Strong looks at eight contemporary art types—the scissors dance (danza de tijeras), home altars (retablos), carved gourds (mates), ceramics (ceramica), painted boards (tablas), weavings (textiles), tinware (hojalateria), and Huamanga stone carvings (piedra de Huamanga). She includes prehistoric and historic information about each art form, its religious meaning, the natural environment and sociopolitical processes that help to shape its expression, and how it is constructed or performed by today’s artists, many of whom are quoted in the book.
Read More

Lords of the Ancient Andes

Author: Susan E. Bergh,Luis Guillermo Lumbreras,Luis Jaime Castillo

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9780500516560

Category: Art

Page: 296

View: 1090

"Eminent ancestors of the better-known Inca, the Wari ascended to power in the south-central highlands of Peru in about AD 600, underwent a period of explosive growth, and then, by AD 1000, collapsed. During this lifespan, they created a society of such unprecedented complexity that many today regard it as the first empire in the Andes. Elite arts and the ideologies that informed them were among the culture's most prominent exports. From their eponymous capital, one of the largest archaeological sites inSouth America, the Wari sent elaborate objects and textiles to their highland provincial centers as well as down into populous Pacific coastal areas to the west. The arts were crucial to their political, economic, and religious systems. Since the Wari did not write, the arts took on special roles in preserving and communicating information. This book is published on the occasion of an exhibition organized by the Cleveland Museum of Art that features some 170 objects from collections in Canada, Europe, Peru, and the United States. The selection covers the full range of Wari elite arts: elaborate textiles, which probably were at the core of Wari value systems; sophisticated ceramics of various styles; exquisite personal ornaments made of precious materials; carved wood containers; and works in stone and other media. The exhibition, the first in North America devoted to the arts of the Wari, was curated and the cataloged edited by Susan E. Bergh, curator of Pre-Columbian and Native North American art at theCleveland Museum of Art."--P. [2] of cover.
Read More

Author: John Sillevis,David Elliott,Edward J. Sullivan

Publisher: Yale University Press

ISBN: 0300123590

Category: Art

Page: 283

View: 2252

Colombian-born Fernando Botero (b. 1932) is a painter, sculptor, and draftsman renowned for his extravagantly rounded figures combining the polish and excess of Spanish colonial baroque with the social realism of the Mexican muralists. Their humorous exaggeration belies the more serious content of Botero’s work—commentary on colonialism, political instability in Latin America, and the vernacular artistic traditions of the region, as well as European art history. Accompanying the artist’s first American retrospective in over thirty years, The Baroque World of Fernando Botero is the most extensive study of his life and work to date. Drawn exclusively from Botero’s private collection, the 100 works featured in this book, including previously unpublished paintings and drawings, represent the full scope of his oeuvre from a uniquely personal perspective. Many of these—portraits of friends and family members and remembered scenes—have remained in the artist’s possession since their creation, while others he has bought back over the years as markers of significant developments in his career. Three essays examine the artist’s creative life, from the aesthetic environment in which Botero developed his unique style to his catalyzing influence on the Colombian art world of the 1960s and 70s.
Read More

Colombian Crafts from the Andes to the Amazon

Author: Liliana Villegas

Publisher: Villegas Asociados

ISBN: 9789589393833

Category: Art

Page: 240

View: 3358

The artifacts that remain today from ancient Columbian civilizations reveal a remarkable people-who built homes that could withstand the elements in the world's wettest rain forest, carved monumental statues of their ancient ancestors and sacred spirits, and tantalized the western world with the beauty of their golden objects set with the finest emeralds. These artifacts serve not only as a testimony of the great achievements of cultures that disappeared long ago, but as patterns and inspirations for those who still carry on these craft traditions in the tropical rain forests or snow-capped mountains of what is today Columbia. This book presents artifacts—or artefactos—from everyday life, objects that have accompanied Columbian people through the centuries, both in their earthly and spiritual activities. In both English and Spanish, the word artifact means, literally, "made with skill or art." Although all worthy of museums and galleries, these are not just exhibition pieces, nor are their makers all members of a separate artisan class. There is no Columbian home, however humble, that does not have a handmade broom, stool, basket, textile, or rustic furniture; nor is there a single Amazon Indian who cannot quickly piece together a basket from leaves found in the jungle. Many of the crafts made today still retain a significance beyond the strictly utilitarian, from the basket holder whose hourglass shape is a fertility symbol to the stool carved by a young man as a sign of his goldwork to basketry, weaving to pottery, are an astounding body of work and provide a lesson in how people use their natural environment—and their hands—to create splendid objects and surrounds.
Read More

Objects, Devotions and the Early Modern World

Author: Michael Wayne Cole,Rebecca Zorach

Publisher: Ashgate Publishing, Ltd.

ISBN: 9780754652908

Category: History

Page: 356

View: 7331

Conflicting attitudes towards devotional art was a major factor in the confessional divisions that split Reformation Europe. By presenting essays concerned with both European subjects and European perceptions of other cultures, The Idol in the Age of Art contributes to ongoing attempts to globalize the study of European art. Approaching the Reformation idol as an essentially international problem, and placing particular emphasis on cultural encounters, it provides fresh perspectives on the very nature of Renaissance art, and underscores how colonial issues came to be often framed in terms of European religious conflicts.
Read More

Author: Barbara Burn

Publisher: Metropolitan Museum of Art

ISBN: 0870996770

Category: Art

Page: 320

View: 449

"The Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York City is a living encyclopedia of world art. Cultures from every part of the world - from Florence to Thebes, from Pennsylvania to Papua, New Guinea - from the ancient world to the present, and in every medium, are represented, frequently at the highest levels of quality. This book presents over 250 of the finest masterpieces in the Metropolitan's collection, drawn from more than three million works in eighteen different curatorial departments. Some of these splendid objects, such as the Temple of Dendur, Botticelli's Annunciation, Rembrandt's Aristotle with a Bust of Homer, and Leutze's Washington Crossing the Delaware, are very famous; others, including a rare Chinese scroll, a drawing by Michelangelo, and an ornate Turkish sword, are less well known. All are remarkable and unique. The works have been arranged in a generally chronological order by culture, beginning with ancient Egypt and ending with the twentieth century in Europe and America. Each reproduction is accompanied by a text that includes pertinent information about the work."--BOOK JACKET.Title Summary field provided by Blackwell North America, Inc. All Rights Reserved
Read More

An In-Depth Exploration of Essential Concepts and Processes from around the World

Author: Sandor Ellix Katz

Publisher: Chelsea Green Publishing

ISBN: 1603583645

Category: Cooking

Page: 528

View: 6865

Winner of the 2013 James Beard Foundation Book Award for Reference and Scholarship, and a New York Times bestseller, The Art of Fermentation is the most comprehensive guide to do-it-yourself home fermentation ever published. Sandor Katz presents the concepts and processes behind fermentation in ways that are simple enough to guide a reader through their first experience making sauerkraut or yogurt, and in-depth enough to provide greater understanding and insight for experienced practitioners. While Katz expertly contextualizes fermentation in terms of biological and cultural evolution, health and nutrition, and even economics, this is primarily a compendium of practical information—how the processes work; parameters for safety; techniques for effective preservation; troubleshooting; and more. With two-color illustrations and extended resources, this book provides essential wisdom for cooks, homesteaders, farmers, gleaners, foragers, and food lovers of any kind who want to develop a deeper understanding and appreciation for arguably the oldest form of food preservation, and part of the roots of culture itself. Readers will find detailed information on fermenting vegetables; sugars into alcohol (meads, wines, and ciders); sour tonic beverages; milk; grains and starchy tubers; beers (and other grain-based alcoholic beverages); beans; seeds; nuts; fish; meat; and eggs, as well as growing mold cultures, using fermentation in agriculture, art, and energy production, and considerations for commercial enterprises. Sandor Katz has introduced what will undoubtedly remain a classic in food literature, and is the first—and only—of its kind.
Read More

Visual Expression and Its Relation to Andean Beliefs and Values

Author: Penny Dransart

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Antiques & Collectibles

Page: 317

View: 7783

The aim of the book is to explore various facets of artistic expression (ranging temporally from four thousand years ago to the present day) in the Andean regions of South America, based on themes: social contexts, cultural expressions, recontextualisation, construction and meaning, and the role of art in the creation and animation of Andean landscapes. The various authors also move towards an archaeology, anthropology, or art history of visual expression that allows for an assessment of self-critical and reflexive developments on the part of the people who produced the artistic works under consideration. These visual worlds they created and continue to create make art in the Andes a fruitful and exciting field of study
Read More

Art and Ritual In Colonial Cuzco

Author: Carol Damian

Publisher: Grassfield Press

ISBN: N.A

Category: Art

Page: 110

View: 915

"Reconstructs the history of the Virgin of Cuzco who, as a fusion of indigenous Andean and Spanish Christian beliefs and practices, represents both the Virgin Mary and Pachamama. Includes background chapters on Andean and Spanish beliefs and art. Major, m
Read More

Art and Archaeology of the Recuay Culture

Author: George F. Lau

Publisher: University of Iowa Press

ISBN: 1587299747

Category: Social Science

Page: 338

View: 690

Flourishing from A.D. 1 to 700, the Recuay inhabited lands in northern Peru just below the imposing glaciers of the highest mountain chain in the tropics. Thriving on an economy of high-altitude crops and camelid herding, they left behind finely made artworks and grand palatial buildings with an unprecedented aesthetic and a high degree of technical sophistication. In this first in-depth study of these peoples, George Lau situates the Recuay within the great diversification of cultural styles associated with the Early Intermediate Period, provides new and significant evidence to evaluate models of social complexity, and offers fresh theories about life, settlement, art, and cosmology in the high Andes. Lau crafts a nuanced social and historical model in order to evaluate the record of Recuay developments as part of a wider Andean prehistory. He analyzes the rise and decline of Recuay groups as well as their special interactions with the Andean landscape. Their coherence was expressed as shared culture, community, and corporate identity, but Lau also reveals its diversity through time and space in order to challenge the monolithic characterizations of Recuay society pervasive in the literature today. Many of the innovations in Recuay culture, revealed for the first time in this landmark volume, left a lasting impact on Andean history and continue to have relevance today. The author highlights the ways that material things intervened in ancient social and political life, rather than being merely passive reflections of historical change, to show that Recuay public art, exchange, technological innovations, warfare, and religion offer key insights into the emergence of social hierarchy and chiefly leadership and the formation, interaction, and later dissolution of large discrete polities. By presenting Recuay artifacts as fundamentally social in the sense of creating and negotiating relations among persons, places, and things, he recognizes in the complexities of the past an enduring order and intelligence that shape the contours of history.
Read More

Author: Elizabeth P. Benson

Publisher: University of Texas Press

ISBN: 0292742630

Category: Social Science

Page: 192

View: 5304

The Moche, or Mochica, created an extraordinary civilization on the north coast of Peru for most of the first millennium AD. Although they had no written language with which to record their history and beliefs, the Moche built enormous ceremonial edifices and embellished them with mural paintings depicting supernatural figures and rituals. Highly skilled Moche artisans crafted remarkable ceramic vessels, which they painted with figures and scenes or modeled like sculpture, and mastered metallurgy in gold, silver, and copper to make impressive symbolic ornaments. They also wove textiles that were complex in execution and design. A senior scholar renowned for her discoveries about the Moche, Elizabeth P. Benson published the first English-language monograph on the subject in 1972. Now in this volume, she draws on decades of knowledge, as well as the findings of other researchers, to offer a grand overview of all that is currently known about the Moche. Touching on all significant aspects of Moche culture, she covers such topics as their worldview and ritual life, ceremonial architecture and murals, art and craft, supernatural beings, government and warfare, and burial and the afterlife. She demonstrates that the Moche expressed, with symbolic language in metal and clay, what cultures in other parts of the world presented in writing. Indeed, Benson asserts that the accomplishments of the Moche are comparable to those of their Mesoamerica contemporaries, the Maya, which makes them one of the most advanced civilizations of pre-Columbian America.
Read More

A History of the Art of War Among the Carthaginians and Romans Down to the Battle of Pydna, 168 B. C.

Author: Theodore Ayrault Dodge

Publisher: Tales End Press

ISBN: 1623580056

Category: History

Page: N.A

View: 9393

Read More

Tapestries and Silverwork, 1530-1830

Author: Elena Phipps,Johanna Hecht,Cristina Esteras Martín

Publisher: Metropolitan Museum of Art

ISBN: 1588391310

Category: Indian silverwork

Page: 396

View: 7552

The arrival of the Spanish in South America in 1532 permanently transformed the Andean cultural landscape. Within a generation, societies that had developed over thousands of years, including the great Inca Empire, had been irrevocably altered. The arts from the Spanish colonial period--those that drew on native traditions, such as textiles, silver, woodwork, and stonework, as well as painting, sculpture, and other genres introduced by the Spanish--preserve an unspoken dialogue that developed between Andean and European modes of expression.This beautiful book presents silver objects, textiles, and other masterpieces of colonial Andean culture. Essays discuss the artistry of this culture and explain how it has been recently reevaluated and celebrated for its vibrant energy reflecting the convergence of two essentially distinct cultural traditions. This book accompanies an exhibition at The Metropolitan Museum of Art (September 29 to December 12, 2004).Elena Phipps is conservator, Textile Conservation, and Johanna Hecht is associate curator, European Sculpture and Decorative Arts, at The Metropolitan Museum of Art.
Read More

A Recognition of Others

Author: George F. Lau

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 0415519217

Category: Social Science

Page: 200

View: 1859

Ancient Alterity in the Andes is the first major treatment on ancient alterity: how people in the past regarded others. At least since the 1970s, alterity has been an influential concept in different fields, from art history, psychology and philosophy, to linguistics and ethnography. Having gained steam in concert with postmodernism's emphasis on self-reflection and discourse, it is especially significant now as a framework to understand the process of 'writing' and understanding the Other: groups, cultures and cosmologies. This book showcases this concept by illustrating how people visualised others in the past, and how it coloured their engagements with them, both physically and cognitively. Alterity has yet to see sustained treatment in archaeology due in great part to the fact that the archaeological record is not always equipped to inform on the subject. Like its kindred concepts, such as identity and ethnicity, alterity is difficult to observe also because it can be expressed at different times and scales, from the individual, family and village settings, to contexts such as nations and empires. It can also be said to 'reside' just as well in objects and individuals, as it may in a technique, action or performance. One requires a relevant, holistic data set and multiple lines of evidence. Ancient Alterity in the Andes provides just that by focusing on the great achievements of the ancient Andes during the first millennium AD, centred on a Precolumbian culture, known as Recuay (AD 1-700). Using a new framework of alterity, one based on social others (e.g., kinsfolk, animals, predators, enemies, ancestral dead), the book rethinks cultural relationships with other groups, including the Moche and Nasca civilisations of Peru's coast, the Chavín cult, and the later Wari, the first Andean empire. In revealing little known patterns in Andean prehistory the book illuminates the ways that archaeologists, in general, can examine alterity through the existing record. Ancient Alterity in the Andes is a substantial boon to the analysis and writing of past cultures, social systems and cosmologies and an important book for those wishing to understand this developing concept in archaeological theory.
Read More