A Brief History with Documents

Author: Waldo E. Martin

Publisher: Macmillan

ISBN: 9780312111526

Category: History

Page: 253

View: 8465

This book addresses the origins, development, meanings, and consequences of the 1954 Supreme Court decision to end Jim Crow segregation. Using legal documents to frame the debates surrounding the case, Waldo Martin presents Brown v. Board of Education as an event, a symbol, and a key marker in the black liberation struggle.
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A Brief History with Documents

Author: Waldo E. Martin,Waldo Martin, Jr.

Publisher: Macmillan

ISBN: 9780312128111

Category: History

Page: 253

View: 2867

A general introduction analyzes the case's legal precedents and situates the case in the historical context of Jim Crow discrimination and the burgeoning development of the NAACP. Photographs, a collection of political cartoons, a chronology, questions for consideration, a bibliography, and an index are also included.
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The History of Brown v. Board of Education and Black America's Struggle for Equality

Author: Richard Kluger

Publisher: Vintage

ISBN: 030754608X

Category: Law

Page: 880

View: 5592

Simple Justice is the definitive history of the landmark case Brown v. Board of Education and the epic struggle for racial equality in this country. Combining intensive research with original interviews with surviving participants, Richard Kluger provides the fullest possible view of the human and legal drama in the years before 1954, the cumulative assaults on the white power structure that defended segregation, and the step-by-step establishment of a team of inspired black lawyers that could successfully challenge the law. Now, on the fiftieth anniversary of the unanimous Supreme Court decision that ended legal segregation, Kluger has updated his work with a new final chapter covering events and issues that have arisen since the book was first published, including developments in civil rights and recent cases involving affirmative action, which rose directly out of Brown v. Board of Education. From the Trade Paperback edition.
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Author: Charles J. Ogletree

Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company

ISBN: 0393608522

Category: History

Page: 432

View: 7536

"An effective blend of memoir, history and legal analysis."—Christopher Benson, Washington Post Book World In what John Hope Franklin calls "an essential work" on race and affirmative action, Charles Ogletree, Jr., tells his personal story of growing up a "Brown baby" against a vivid pageant of historical characters that includes, among others, Thurgood Marshall, Martin Luther King, Jr., Earl Warren, Anita Hill, Alan Bakke, and Clarence Thomas. A measured blend of personal memoir, exacting legal analysis, and brilliant insight, Ogletree's eyewitness account of the legacy of Brown v. Board of Education offers a unique vantage point from which to view five decades of race relations in America.
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A Fight for Simple Justice

Author: Susan Goldman Rubin

Publisher: Holiday House

ISBN: 9780823440351

Category: Juvenile Nonfiction

Page: 144

View: 1279

An award-winning author chronicles the fascinating story behind the landmark Supreme Court decision. In 1954, one of the most significant Supreme Court decisions of the twentieth Century aimed to end school segregation in the United States. The ruling was the culmination of work by many people who stood up to racial inequality, some risking significant danger and hardship, and of careful strategizing by the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP). Award-winning author SUSAN GOLDMAN RUBIN tells the stories behind the ruling and the people responsible for it., and brings readers up to date with a country still grappling with a public school system not yet fully desegregated. Historical photographs, a time line, texts of primary sources and other valuable back matter are included.
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The Quiet Reversal of Brown V. Board of Education

Author: Gary Orfield,Susan E. Eaton

Publisher: The New Press

ISBN: 1565844017

Category: Education

Page: 424

View: 5501

Discusses the reversal of desegration in public schools
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Author: Michael J. Klarman

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0195307461

Category: Law

Page: 284

View: 3041

Introduction. 1. The Jim Crow Era. 2. World War II. 3. Brown v. Board of Education. 4. Brown II and Subsequent Desegretaion Developments. 5. Brown's Direct Effects. 6. Brown's Indirect Effects. 7. Brown's Backlash. 8. Why Massive Resistance?. 9. Brown, Violence, and Civil Rights Legislation. Conclusion. Notes on Sources. Select Bibliography.
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The Rise and Retreat of School Desegregation

Author: Charles T. Clotfelter

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN: 140084133X

Category: Education

Page: 272

View: 7772

The United States Supreme Court's 1954 landmark decision, Brown v. Board of Education, set into motion a process of desegregation that would eventually transform American public schools. This book provides a comprehensive and up-to-date assessment of how Brown's most visible effect--contact between students of different racial groups--has changed over the fifty years since the decision. Using both published and unpublished data on school enrollments from across the country, Charles Clotfelter uses measures of interracial contact, racial isolation, and segregation to chronicle the changes. He goes beyond previous studies by drawing on heretofore unanalyzed enrollment data covering the first decade after Brown, calculating segregation for metropolitan areas rather than just school districts, accounting for private schools, presenting recent information on segregation within schools, and measuring segregation in college enrollment. Two main conclusions emerge. First, interracial contact in American schools and colleges increased markedly over the period, with the most dramatic changes occurring in the previously segregated South. Second, despite this change, four main factors prevented even larger increases: white reluctance to accept racially mixed schools, the multiplicity of options for avoiding such schools, the willingness of local officials to accommodate the wishes of reluctant whites, and the eventual loss of will on the part of those who had been the strongest protagonists in the push for desegregation. Thus decreases in segregation within districts were partially offset by growing disparities between districts and by selected increases in private school enrollment.
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A Brief History with Documents

Author: Brook Thomas

Publisher: Macmillan

ISBN: 9780312137434

Category: History

Page: 205

View: 9289

In 1896, The Supreme Court's Plessy v. Ferguson decision made legal a system of "separate but equal" racial segregation not overruled until 1954. Using the full text of the Court's opinion, along with a selection of responses to the ruling, Brook Thomas allows students to re-create a context of the complicated debates and conditions in which the decision took place.
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Author: Bernard Schwartz

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780195093872

Category: History

Page: 465

View: 9570

A comprehensive history of the United States Supreme Court from its ill-esteemed beginning in 1790 to one of the most important and controversial branches of the Federal government.
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A Biography of Earl Warren

Author: Ed Cray

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN: 0684808528

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 603

View: 7711

Traces the life and career of the former Chief Justice of the Supreme Court, including his role as head of the Warren Commission, and assesses his impact on American society
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Caste, Culture, and the Constitution

Author: Robert J. Cottrol,Leland Ware

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9780700612895

Category: History

Page: 292

View: 2371

Tracing the litigations, highlighting the pivotal role of the NAACP, and including incisive portraits of key players, this book simply but powerfully shows that "Brown" not only changed the national equation of race and caste, it also changed our view of the Court's role in American life.
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A Civil Rights Milestone and Its Troubled Legacy

Author: James T. Patterson

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0199880840

Category: History

Page: 320

View: 9219

2004 marks the fiftieth anniversary of the Supreme Court's unanimous decision to end segregation in public schools. Many people were elated when Supreme Court Chief Justice Earl Warren delivered Brown v. Board of Education of Topeka in May 1954, the ruling that struck down state-sponsored racial segregation in America's public schools. Thurgood Marshall, chief attorney for the black families that launched the litigation, exclaimed later, "I was so happy, I was numb." The novelist Ralph Ellison wrote, "another battle of the Civil War has been won. The rest is up to us and I'm very glad. What a wonderful world of possibilities are unfolded for the children!" Here, in a concise, moving narrative, Bancroft Prize-winning historian James T. Patterson takes readers through the dramatic case and its fifty-year aftermath. A wide range of characters animates the story, from the little-known African Americans who dared to challenge Jim Crow with lawsuits (at great personal cost); to Thurgood Marshall, who later became a Justice himself; to Earl Warren, who shepherded a fractured Court to a unanimous decision. Others include segregationist politicians like Governor Orval Faubus of Arkansas; Presidents Eisenhower, Johnson, and Nixon; and controversial Supreme Court justices such as William Rehnquist and Clarence Thomas. Most Americans still see Brown as a triumph--but was it? Patterson shrewdly explores the provocative questions that still swirl around the case. Could the Court--or President Eisenhower--have done more to ensure compliance with Brown? Did the decision touch off the modern civil rights movement? How useful are court-ordered busing and affirmative action against racial segregation? To what extent has racial mixing affected the academic achievement of black children? Where indeed do we go from here to realize the expectations of Marshall, Ellison, and others in 1954?
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A Brief History with Documents

Author: Nancy Woloch

Publisher: Macmillan

ISBN: 9780312085865

Category: History

Page: 206

View: 6999

The first brief book on the landmark 1908 Supreme Court decision that limited a woman's workday to ten hours, this text offers a concise analysis of the origins and impact of Muller v. Oregon. Woloch's comprehensive narrative familiarizes readers with Progressive reform, the case itself, and the conflict Muller generated within the women's movement over the issue of classification by gender. A rich collection of primary documents - including court decisions, the Brandeis brief, and essays by leading Progressive-era reformers - enables readers to analyze the decision and the ensuing debate. Editorial features include headnotes, a chronology, a bibliography, and illustrations.
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Self-defense as Activism in the Civil Rights Era

Author: Christopher B. Strain

Publisher: University of Georgia Press

ISBN: 9780820326870

Category: History

Page: 254

View: 9941

In this study of self-defense as it was debated and practiced during the civil rights era, the decision to defend oneself and family is reframed in terms of a daily concern for many African Americans who faced the continual menace of white aggression. Simultaneous.
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The Debate Over Discrimination and School Funding

Author: Paul A. Sracic

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Education

Page: 169

View: 5447

An in-depth study of school financing examined through the closely decided Supreme Court case that overturned a ruling that found Texas's system for financing its public schools was unconstitutional, signaling the end of an era in the pursuit of equal education for all American citizens.
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The Making of a Supreme Court Justice

Author: Larry S. Gibson

Publisher: Prometheus Books

ISBN: 1616145722

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 413

View: 7101

Thurgood Marshall was the most important American lawyer of the twentieth century. He transformed the nation's legal landscape by challenging the racial segregation that had relegated millions to second-class citizenship. He won twenty-nine of thirty-three cases before the United States Supreme Court, was a federal appeals court judge, served as the US solicitor general, and, for twenty-four years, sat on the Supreme Court. Marshall is best known for achievements after he relocated to New York in 1936 to work for the NAACP. But Marshall's personality, attitudes, priorities, and work habits had crystallized during earlier years in Maryland. This work is the first close examination of the formative period in Marshall's life. As the authorn shows, Thurgood Marshall was a fascinating man of contrasts. He fought for racial justice without becoming a racist. Simultaneously idealistic and pragmatic, Marshall was a passionate advocate, yet he maintained friendly relationships with his opponents. Young Thurgood reveals how Marshall's distinctive traits were molded by events, people, and circumstances early in his life. Professor Gibson presents fresh information about Marshall's family, youth, and education. He describes Marshall's key mentors, the special impact of his high school and college competitive debating, his struggles to establish a law practice during the Great Depression, and his first civil rights cases. The author sheds new light on the NAACP and its first lawsuits in the campaign that led to the 1954 Brown v. Board of Education school desegregation decision. He also corrects some of the often-repeated stories about Marshall that are inaccurate. The only biography of Thurgood Marshall to be endorsed by Marshall’s immediate family, Young Thurgood is an exhaustively researched and engagingly written work that everyone interested in law, civil rights, American history, and biography will want to read. From the Hardcover edition.
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A Brief History with Documents

Author: Waldo E. Martin,Waldo Martin, Jr.

Publisher: Macmillan

ISBN: 9780312128111

Category: History

Page: 253

View: 9563

A general introduction analyzes the case's legal precedents and situates the case in the historical context of Jim Crow discrimination and the burgeoning development of the NAACP. Photographs, a collection of political cartoons, a chronology, questions for consideration, a bibliography, and an index are also included.
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One City, Two Schools, and the Story of Educational Opportunity in Modern America

Author: James E. Ryan

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0199745609

Category: Education

Page: 384

View: 3842

How is it that, half a century after Brown v. Board of Education, educational opportunities remain so unequal for black and white students, not to mention poor and wealthy ones? In his important new book, Five Miles Away, A World Apart, James E. Ryan answers this question by tracing the fortunes of two schools in Richmond, Virginia--one in the city and the other in the suburbs. Ryan shows how court rulings in the 1970s, limiting the scope of desegregation, laid the groundwork for the sharp disparities between urban and suburban public schools that persist to this day. The Supreme Court, in accord with the wishes of the Nixon administration, allowed the suburbs to lock nonresidents out of their school systems. City schools, whose student bodies were becoming increasingly poor and black, simply received more funding, a measure that has proven largely ineffective, while the independence (and superiority) of suburban schools remained sacrosanct. Weaving together court opinions, social science research, and compelling interviews with students, teachers, and principals, Ryan explains why all the major education reforms since the 1970s--including school finance litigation, school choice, and the No Child Left Behind Act--have failed to bridge the gap between urban and suburban schools and have unintentionally entrenched segregation by race and class. As long as that segregation continues, Ryan forcefully argues, so too will educational inequality. Ryan closes by suggesting innovative ways to promote school integration, which would take advantage of unprecedented demographic shifts and an embrace of diversity among young adults. Exhaustively researched and elegantly written by one of the nation's leading education law scholars, Five Miles Away, A World Apart ties together, like no other book, a half-century's worth of education law and politics into a coherent, if disturbing, whole. It will be of interest to anyone who has ever wondered why our schools are so unequal and whether there is anything to be done about it.
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