Thinking about the Present as If it Were the Past

Author: Chuck Klosterman

Publisher: Penguin

ISBN: 0399184139

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 288

View: 1015

"But What If We're Wrong? visualizes the contemporary world as it will appear to those who'll perceive it as the distant past"--
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Thinking About the Present As If It Were the Past

Author: Chuck Klosterman

Publisher: Penguin

ISBN: 0399184147

Category: Social Science

Page: 288

View: 1756

New York Times bestselling author Chuck Klosterman asks questions that are profound in their simplicity: How certain are we about our understanding of gravity? How certain are we about our understanding of time? What will be the defining memory of rock music, five hundred years from today? How seriously should we view the content of our dreams? How seriously should we view the content of television? Are all sports destined for extinction? Is it possible that the greatest artist of our era is currently unknown (or—weirder still—widely known, but entirely disrespected)? Is it possible that we “overrate” democracy? And perhaps most disturbing, is it possible that we’ve reached the end of knowledge? Klosterman visualizes the contemporary world as it will appear to those who'll perceive it as the distant past. Kinetically slingshotting through a broad spectrum of objective and subjective problems, But What If We’re Wrong? is built on interviews with a variety of creative thinkers—George Saunders, David Byrne, Jonathan Lethem, Kathryn Schulz, Neil deGrasse Tyson, Brian Greene, Junot Díaz, Amanda Petrusich, Ryan Adams, Nick Bostrom, Dan Carlin, and Richard Linklater, among others—interwoven with the type of high-wire humor and nontraditional analysis only Klosterman would dare to attempt. It’s a seemingly impossible achievement: a book about the things we cannot know, explained as if we did. It’s about how we live now, once “now” has become “then.” From the Hardcover edition.
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Author: Chuck Klosterman

Publisher: Amberley Publishing Limited

ISBN: 1445663392

Category: Philosophy

Page: 288

View: 7083

What if everything we are most certain about turns out to be totally wrong?
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Author: Chuck Klosterman

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN: 1416544208

Category: Literary Collections

Page: 245

View: 5187

Takes a humorous look at expectations versus reality in pop culture, sports, and media, exploring such topics as pop culture's obsession with time travel and what Kurt Cobain and David Koresh have in common.
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A Low Culture Manifesto

Author: Chuck Klosterman

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN: 9780743236010

Category: Humor

Page: 253

View: 1578

Explores a range of modern cultural phenomenon, including Internet pornography, tribute bands, baseball rivalries, and reality television.
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A Highly Specific, Defiantly Incomplete History of the Early 21st Century

Author: Chuck Klosterman

Publisher: Penguin

ISBN: 0399184171

Category: Social Science

Page: 464

View: 4744

New York Times-bestselling author and cultural critic Chuck Klosterman sorts through the past decade and how we got to now. Chuck Klosterman has created an incomparable body of work in books, magazines, newspapers, and on the Web. His writing spans the realms of culture and sports, while also addressing interpersonal issues, social quandaries, and ethical boundaries. Klosterman has written nine previous books, helped found and establish Grantland, served as the New York Times Magazine Ethicist, worked on film and television productions, and contributed profiles and essays to outlets such as GQ, Esquire, Billboard, The A.V. Club, and The Guardian. Chuck Klosterman's tenth book (aka Chuck Klosterman X) collects his most intriguing of those pieces, accompanied by fresh introductions and new footnotes throughout. Klosterman presents many of the articles in their original form, featuring previously unpublished passages and digressions. Subjects include Breaking Bad, Lou Reed, zombies, KISS, Jimmy Page, Stephen Malkmus, steroids, Mountain Dew, Chinese Democracy, The Beatles, Jonathan Franzen, Taylor Swift, Tim Tebow, Kobe Bryant, Usain Bolt, Eddie Van Halen, Charlie Brown, the Cleveland Browns, and many more cultural figures and pop phenomena. This is a tour of the past decade from one of the sharpest and most prolific observers of our unusual times.
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Or A Life of Montaigne in One Question and Twenty Attempts at an Answer

Author: Sarah Bakewell

Publisher: Other Press, LLC

ISBN: 1590514262

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 400

View: 2584

Winner of the 2010 National Book Critics Circle Award for Biography How to get along with people, how to deal with violence, how to adjust to losing someone you love—such questions arise in most people’s lives. They are all versions of a bigger question: how do you live? How do you do the good or honorable thing, while flourishing and feeling happy? This question obsessed Renaissance writers, none more than Michel Eyquem de Monatigne, perhaps the first truly modern individual. A nobleman, public official and wine-grower, he wrote free-roaming explorations of his thought and experience, unlike anything written before. He called them “essays,” meaning “attempts” or “tries.” Into them, he put whatever was in his head: his tastes in wine and food, his childhood memories, the way his dog’s ears twitched when it was dreaming, as well as the appalling events of the religious civil wars raging around him. The Essays was an instant bestseller and, over four hundred years later, Montaigne’s honesty and charm still draw people to him. Readers come in search of companionship, wisdom and entertainment—and in search of themselves. This book, a spirited and singular biography, relates the story of his life by way of the questions he posed and the answers he explored. It traces his bizarre upbringing, youthful career and sexual adventures, his travels, and his friendships with the scholar and poet Étienne de La Boétie and with his adopted “daughter,” Marie de Gournay. And we also meet his readers—who for centuries have found in Montaigne an inexhaustible source of answers to the haunting question, “how to live?”
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A Decade of Curious People and Dangerous Ideas

Author: Chuck Klosterman

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN: 0743284887

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 374

View: 511

A collection by the pop culture commentator includes some of his most noteworthy profiles and trend stories, a selection of favorite opinion pieces, and a semi-autobiographical short story, in a volume complemented by twenty "hypothetical questions."
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Adventures in the Margin of Error

Author: Kathryn Schulz

Publisher: Harper Collins

ISBN: 0061176052

Category: Psychology

Page: 416

View: 2803

To err is human. Yet most of us go through life assuming (and sometimes insisting) that we are right about nearly everything, from the origins of the universe to how to load the dishwasher. In Being Wrong, journalist Kathryn Schulz explores why we find it so gratifying to be right and so maddening to be mistaken. Drawing on thinkers as varied as Augustine, Darwin, Freud, Gertrude Stein, Alan Greenspan, and Groucho Marx, she shows that error is both a given and a gift—one that can transform our worldviews, our relationships, and ourselves.
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How Good Is It? How Can We Know?

Author: Philip E. Tetlock

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN: 1400888816

Category: Political Science

Page: 368

View: 7762

Since its original publication, Expert Political Judgment by New York Times bestselling author Philip Tetlock has established itself as a contemporary classic in the literature on evaluating expert opinion. Tetlock first discusses arguments about whether the world is too complex for people to find the tools to understand political phenomena, let alone predict the future. He evaluates predictions from experts in different fields, comparing them to predictions by well-informed laity or those based on simple extrapolation from current trends. He goes on to analyze which styles of thinking are more successful in forecasting. Classifying thinking styles using Isaiah Berlin's prototypes of the fox and the hedgehog, Tetlock contends that the fox--the thinker who knows many little things, draws from an eclectic array of traditions, and is better able to improvise in response to changing events--is more successful in predicting the future than the hedgehog, who knows one big thing, toils devotedly within one tradition, and imposes formulaic solutions on ill-defined problems. He notes a perversely inverse relationship between the best scientific indicators of good judgement and the qualities that the media most prizes in pundits--the single-minded determination required to prevail in ideological combat. Clearly written and impeccably researched, the book fills a huge void in the literature on evaluating expert opinion. It will appeal across many academic disciplines as well as to corporations seeking to develop standards for judging expert decision-making. Now with a new preface in which Tetlock discusses the latest research in the field, the book explores what constitutes good judgment in predicting future events and looks at why experts are often wrong in their forecasts.
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Grappling with Villains (Real and Imagined)

Author: Chuck Klosterman

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN: 143918450X

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 214

View: 5019

The cultural critic questions how modern people understand the concept of villainy, describing how his youthful idealism gave way to an adult sympathy with notorious cultural figures to offer insight into the appeal of anti-heroes.
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A Novel

Author: Chuck Klosterman

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN: 143918447X

Category: Fiction

Page: 256

View: 7478

Treating a delusional scientist who has been using cloaking technology from an aborted government project to render himself nearly invisible, Austin therapist Victoria Vick listens to his accounts of spying on the private lives of others, a situation with which Victoria becomes obsessed to the point that it threatens her career and marriage. 125,000 first printing.
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Making Smarter Decisions When You Don't Have All the Facts

Author: Annie Duke

Publisher: Penguin

ISBN: 0735216363

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 288

View: 3266

Poker champion turned business consultant Annie Duke teaches you how to get comfortable with uncertainty and make better decisions as a result. In Super Bowl XLIX, Seahawks coach Pete Carroll made one of the most controversial calls in football history: With 26 seconds remaining, and trailing by four at the Patriots' one-yard line, he called for a pass instead of a hand off to his star running back. The pass was intercepted and the Seahawks lost. Critics called it the dumbest play in history. But was the call really that bad? Or did Carroll actually make a great move that was ruined by bad luck? Even the best decision doesn't yield the best outcome every time. There's always an element of luck that you can't control, and there is always information that is hidden from view. So the key to long-term success (and avoiding worrying yourself to death) is to think in bets: How sure am I? What are the possible ways things could turn out? What decision has the highest odds of success? Did I land in the unlucky 10% on the strategy that works 90% of the time? Or is my success attributable to dumb luck rather than great decision making? Annie Duke, a former World Series of Poker champion turned business consultant, draws on examples from business, sports, politics, and (of course) poker to share tools anyone can use to embrace uncertainty and make better decisions. For most people, it's difficult to say "I'm not sure" in a world that values and, even, rewards the appearance of certainty. But professional poker players are comfortable with the fact that great decisions don't always lead to great outcomes and bad decisions don't always lead to bad outcomes. By shifting your thinking from a need for certainty to a goal of accurately assessing what you know and what you don't, you'll be less vulnerable to reactive emotions, knee-jerk biases, and destructive habits in your decision making. You'll become more confident, calm, compassionate and successful in the long run.
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A Novel

Author: Chuck Klosterman

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN: 1416580654

Category: Fiction

Page: 288

View: 7373

New York Times Bestselling Author Chuck Klosterman's First Novel Somewhere in North Dakota, there is a town called Owl that isn't there. Disco is over, but punk never happened. They don't have cable. They don't really have pop culture, unless you count grain prices and alcoholism. People work hard and then they die. They hate the government and impregnate teenage girls. But that's not nearly as awful as it sounds; in fact, sometimes it's perfect. Mitch Hrlicka lives in Owl. He plays high school football and worries about his weirdness, or lack thereof. Julia Rabia just moved to Owl. She gets free booze and falls in love with a self-loathing bison farmer who listens to Goats Head Soup. Horace Jones has resided in Owl for seventy-three years. He consumes a lot of coffee, thinks about his dead wife, and understands the truth. They all know each other completely, except that they've never met. Like a colder, Reagan-era version of The Last Picture Show fused with Friday Night Lights, Chuck Klosterman's Downtown Owl is the unpretentious, darkly comedic story of how it feels to exist in a community where rural mythology and violent reality are pretty much the same thing. Loaded with detail and unified by a (very real) blizzard, it's technically about certain people in a certain place at a certain time...but it's really about a problem. And the problem is this: What does it mean to be a normal person? And there is no answer. But in Downtown Owl, what matters more is how you ask the question.
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Author: Terry Beatley

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9780984133482

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 388

View: 1782

This book exposes the lies of the Abortion King and how he set out to decieve the public, politicians, and judges. You will learn of the Catholic Strategy and the Negro Project. "This has been a journey of stepping out in faith, learning how to carry my cross and then trusting the Lord for the results. Motherhood will be restored in America once again with the truth Dr. Bernard Nathanson left behind. I look forward to sharing it with you!" Terry Beatley In a rare interview in 2009, Terry Beatley accepted the pro-life mantle of Dr. Bernard Nathanson, cofounder of NARAL who trained Planned Parenthood doctors on how to take life, not Terry promised to teach his 8-point strategy of deception that led to the decriminalization of abortion and deliver his personal parting message until it becomes common knowledge or until Roe v Wade is overturned. In addition, Terry founded Hosea Initiative, a non-profit organization which teaches the impact of worldview through the pro-life conversion story of Dr. Nathanson. Leveraging the power of redemptive story-telling, Hosea Initiative teaches a broader understanding and the cultural context of the abortion industry's exploitation of women and children. Book Terry as a speaker for your 2018 conference, church or other venue. Book description: Experience this compelling, true story of one doctor who deceived American judges, legislators, clergy and the public . . . and one woman determined to fulfill the promise she made him: to teach America the truth and deliver the doctor's personal parting message. You won't be able to put this book down. In a small apartment in Manhattan, New York, the terminally-ill cofounder of America's abortion industry gave Terry Beatley his personal parting message and instructions to teach how he deceived our country. What Dr. Nathanson revealed to her: - provides a pathway to healing for those exploited by the lies of abortion - exposes a racist population-control plan - explains a deadly political maneuver called the "Catholic Strategy," and - reveals the profound loss of parental rights due to the fabrication of minor's reproductive rights.
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50th Anniversary Edition

Author: Thomas S. Kuhn

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN: 0226458148

Category: Science

Page: 264

View: 7694

A good book may have the power to change the way we see the world, but a great book actually becomes part of our daily consciousness, pervading our thinking to the point that we take it for granted, and we forget how provocative and challenging its ideas once were—and still are. The Structure of Scientific Revolutions is that kind of book. When it was first published in 1962, it was a landmark event in the history and philosophy of science. Fifty years later, it still has many lessons to teach. With The Structure of Scientific Revolutions, Kuhn challenged long-standing linear notions of scientific progress, arguing that transformative ideas don’t arise from the day-to-day, gradual process of experimentation and data accumulation but that the revolutions in science, those breakthrough moments that disrupt accepted thinking and offer unanticipated ideas, occur outside of “normal science,” as he called it. Though Kuhn was writing when physics ruled the sciences, his ideas on how scientific revolutions bring order to the anomalies that amass over time in research experiments are still instructive in our biotech age. This new edition of Kuhn’s essential work in the history of science includes an insightful introduction by Ian Hacking, which clarifies terms popularized by Kuhn, including paradigm and incommensurability, and applies Kuhn’s ideas to the science of today. Usefully keyed to the separate sections of the book, Hacking’s introduction provides important background information as well as a contemporary context. Newly designed, with an expanded index, this edition will be eagerly welcomed by the next generation of readers seeking to understand the history of our perspectives on science.
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What Pop Music Rivalries Reveal About the Meaning of Life

Author: Steven Hyden

Publisher: Little, Brown

ISBN: 0316259144

Category: Music

Page: 304

View: 8147

One of Amazon's Best Books of 2016 So Far Music critic Steven Hyden explores nineteen music rivalries and what they say about life Beatles vs. Stones. Biggie vs. Tupac. Kanye vs. Taylor. Who do you choose? And what does that say about you? Actually--what do these endlessly argued-about pop music rivalries say about us? Music opinions bring out passionate debate in people, and Steven Hyden knows that firsthand. Each chapter in YOUR FAVORITE BAND IS KILLING ME focuses on a pop music rivalry, from the classic to the very recent, and draws connections to the larger forces surrounding the pairing. Through Hendrix vs. Clapton, Hyden explores burning out and fading away, while his take on Miley vs. Sinead gives readers a glimpse into the perennial battle between old and young. Funny and accessible, Hyden's writing combines cultural criticism, personal anecdotes, and music history--and just may prompt you to give your least favorite band another chance.
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Author: Tim Shipman

Publisher: HarperCollins UK

ISBN: 0008215162

Category: History

Page: 688

View: 4506

The best political book of the year’ ANDREW MARR ‘A superb work of storytelling and reporting. Sets new benchmark for the writing of contemporary political history’ Andrew Sparrow, Guardian The only book to tell the full story of how and why Britain voted to leave the EU.
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Author: Daniel Gilbert

Publisher: Vintage Canada

ISBN: 0307371360

Category: Psychology

Page: 336

View: 9520

A smart and funny book by a prominent Harvard psychologist, which uses groundbreaking research and (often hilarious) anecdotes to show us why we’re so lousy at predicting what will make us happy – and what we can do about it. Most of us spend our lives steering ourselves toward the best of all possible futures, only to find that tomorrow rarely turns out as we had expected. Why? As Harvard psychologist Daniel Gilbert explains, when people try to imagine what the future will hold, they make some basic and consistent mistakes. Just as memory plays tricks on us when we try to look backward in time, so does imagination play tricks when we try to look forward. Using cutting-edge research, much of it original, Gilbert shakes, cajoles, persuades, tricks and jokes us into accepting the fact that happiness is not really what or where we thought it was. Among the unexpected questions he poses: Why are conjoined twins no less happy than the general population? When you go out to eat, is it better to order your favourite dish every time, or to try something new? If Ingrid Bergman hadn’t gotten on the plane at the end of Casablanca, would she and Bogey have been better off? Smart, witty, accessible and laugh-out-loud funny, Stumbling on Happiness brilliantly describes all that science has to tell us about the uniquely human ability to envision the future, and how likely we are to enjoy it when we get there. From the Hardcover edition.
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