Rhetoric, Relevance and the Rule of Law

Author: Vasileios Adamidis

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1317168429

Category: History

Page: 244

View: 5319

There has been much debate in scholarship over the factors determining the outcome of legal hearings in classical Athens. Specifically, there is divergence regarding the extent to which judicial panels were influenced by non-legal considerations in addition to, or even instead of, questions of law. Ancient rhetorical theory and practice devoted much attention to character and it is this aspect of Athenian law which forms the focus of this book. Close analysis of the dispute-resolution passages in ancient Greek literature reveals striking similarities with the rhetoric of litigants in the Athenian courts and thus helps to shed light on the function of the courts and the fundamental nature of Athenian law. The widespread use of character evidence in every aspect of argumentation can be traced to the Greek ideas of ‘character’ and ‘personality’, the inductive method of reasoning, and the social, political and institutional structures of the ancient Greek polis. According to the author’s proposed method of interpretation, character evidence was not a means of diverting the jury’s attention away from the legal issues; instead, it was a constructive and relevant way of developing a legal argument.
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Author: Adriaan Lanni

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1139452657

Category: History

Page: N.A

View: 7114

In this 2006 book, Adriaan Lanni draws on contemporary legal thinking to present a model of the legal system of classical Athens. She analyses the Athenians' preference in most cases for ad hoc, discretionary decision-making, as opposed to what moderns would call the rule of law. Lanni argues that the Athenians consciously employed different approaches to legal decision-making in different types of courts. The varied approaches to legal process stems from a deep tension in Athenian practice and thinking, between the demand for flexibility of legal interpretation consistent with the exercise of democratic power by ordinary Athenian jurors; and the demand for consistency and predictability in legal interpretation expected by litigants and necessary to permit citizens to conform their conduct to the law. Lanni presents classical Athens as a case study of a successful legal system that, by modern standards, had an extraordinarily individualised and discretionary approach to justice.
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Author: John G. Gager

Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA

ISBN: 9780195134827

Category: History

Page: 278

View: 6393

"Many of these texts have now been translated into English for the first time, with a substantial translator's introduction revealing the cultural, social, and historical context for the texts. Contributing to the ancient and modern debate about religion and "magic," this book will interest historians, classicists, scholars of religion, and those concerned with ancient magic."--Jacket.
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Author: Richard Garner

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1317800508

Category: History

Page: 172

View: 8279

Law and Society in Classical Athens, first published in 1987, traces the development of legal thought and its relation to Athenian values. Previously Athens’ courts have been regarded as chaotic, isolated from the rest of society and even bizarre. The importance of rhetoric and the mischief made by Aristophanes have devalued the legal process in the eyes of modern scholars, whilst the analysis of legal codes and practice has seemed dauntingly complex. Professor Garner aims to situate the Athenian legal system within the general context of abstract thought on justice and of the democratic politics of the fifth century. His work is a valuable source of information on all aspects of Athenian law and its relation to culture.
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Author: Chris Carey,Ifigeneia Giannadaki,Brenda Griffith-Williams

Publisher: BRILL

ISBN: 9004377891

Category: History

Page: 402

View: 4893

This volume brings together leading scholars and rising researchers in the field of Greek law to examine the role played by the law in thinking and practice in the legal system of classical Athens from a variety of perspectives.
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Zur Legitimation gesellschaftlicher Ordnung

Author: Günter Dux,Frank Welz

Publisher: Springer-Verlag

ISBN: 3663108414

Category: Social Science

Page: 438

View: 1906

In diesem Band der Reihe wird das Verständnis von Moral und Recht von international anerkannten Experten der jeweiligen Fächer dargestellt. Dabei steht die historische Perspektive im Vordergrund. Durch die Beiträge des Buches soll ein neuer Diskurs zwischen den Geistes- und Sozialwissenschaften eröffnet werden.
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Author: Adriaan Lanni

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 0521198801

Category: History

Page: 240

View: 337

This book draws on contemporary legal scholarship to explain why Athens was a remarkably well-ordered society.
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A Naval Perspective

Author: Barry O’Halloran

Publisher: BRILL

ISBN: 9004386157

Category: History

Page: 396

View: 9227

In The Political Economy of Classical Athens – a Naval Perspective, Barry O’Halloran offers an account of the economic history of classical Athens in which its strategy of naval conquest provided the foundations for a period of unprecedented economic efflorescence.
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Author: Sue Blundell

Publisher: Harvard University Press

ISBN: 9780674954731

Category: History

Page: 224

View: 5842

Largely excluded from any public role, the women of ancient Greece nonetheless appear in various guises in the art and writing of the period, and in legal documents. These representations reveal a great deal about women's day-to-day experience as well as their legal and economic position - and how they were regarded by men.
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The Consequences of Litigation in Ancient Athens

Author: Steven Johnstone

Publisher: University of Texas Press

ISBN: 0292740530

Category: History

Page: 207

View: 1705

Athenians performed democracy daily their law courts. Without lawyers or judges, private citizens, acting as accusers and defendants, argued their own cases directly to juries composed typically of 201 to501 jurors, who voted on a verdict without deliberation. This legal system strengthened and perpetuated democracy as Athenians understood it, for it emphasized the ideological equality of all (male) citizens and the hierarchy that placed them above women, children, and slaves. This study uses Athenian court speeches to trace the consequences for both disputants and society of individuals' decisions to turn their quarrels into legal cases. Steven Johnstone argues that Athenian 'law' had no objective existence outside the courts and was therefore, itself inherently rhetorical. This daring new interpretation advances an understanding of Athenian democracy that is not narrowly political, but rather links power to the practices of a particular institution.
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Author: Sheramy Bundrick

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9780521848060

Category: Art

Page: 256

View: 1154

Bundrick proposes that depictions of musical performance were linked to contemporary developments in music.
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Author: Cynthia B. Patterson

Publisher: Harvard University Press

ISBN: 0674041925

Category: History

Page: 304

View: 685

The family, Cynthia Patterson demonstrates, played a key role in the political changes that mark the history of ancient Greece. From the archaic society portrayed in Homer and Hesiod to the Hellenistic age, the private world of the family and household was integral with and essential to the civic realm. Early Greek society was rooted not in clans but in individual households, and a man's or woman's place in the larger community was determined by relationships within those households. The development of the city-state did not result in loss of the family's power and authority, Patterson argues; rather, the protection of household relationships was an important element of early public law. The interaction of civic and family concerns in classical Athens is neatly articulated by the examples of marriage and adultery laws. In law courts and in theater performances, violation of marital relationships was presented as a public danger, the adulterer as a sexual thief. This is an understanding that fits the Athenian concept of the city as the highest form of family. The suppression of the cities with the ascendancy of Alexander's empire led to a new resolution of the relationship between public and private authority: the concept of a community of households, which is clearly exemplified in Menander's plays. Undercutting common interpretations of Greek experience as evolving from clan to patriarchal state, Patterson's insightful analysis sheds new light on the role of men and women in Greek culture.
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Author: Mark Golden

Publisher: JHU Press

ISBN: 9780801846007

Category: History

Page: 268

View: 8615

"Mark Golden has produced a superb book, an important substantive and methodological contribution to the social history of ancient Athens and a model for comparable studies." -- American Historical Review
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relevance and discretion in the lawcourts of classical Athens

Author: Adriaan M. Lanni

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: History

Page: N.A

View: 7529

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Author: Hans Beck

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN: 1118303172

Category: History

Page: 612

View: 2439

This comprehensive volume details the variety of constitutions and types of governing bodies in the ancient Greek world. A collection of original scholarship on ancient Greek governing structures and institutions Explores the multiple manifestations of state action throughout the Greek world Discusses the evolution of government from the Archaic Age to the Hellenistic period, ancient typologies of government, its various branches, principles and procedures and realms of governance Creates a unique synthesis on the spatial and memorial connotations of government by combining the latest institutional research with more recent trends in cultural scholarship
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Historical Perspectives on the Olympic Games

Author: Gerald P. Schaus,Stephen R. Wenn

Publisher: Wilfrid Laurier Univ. Press

ISBN: 1554587794

Category: Sports & Recreation

Page: 408

View: 7843

The Olympic Games have had two lives—the first lasted for a millennium with celebrations every four years at Olympia to honour the god Zeus. The second has blossomed over the past century, from a simple start in Athens in 1896 to a dazzling return to Greece in 2004. Onward to the Olympics provides both an overview and an array of insights into aspects of the Games’ history. Leading North American archaeologists and historians of sport explore the origins of the Games, compare the ancient and the modern, discuss the organization and financing of such massive athletic festivals, and examine the participation ,or the troubling lack of it, by women. Onward to the Olympics bridges the historical divide between the ancient and the modern and concludes with a thought-provoking final essay that attempts to predict the future of the Olympics over the twenty-first century.
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Author: Simon Hornblower,Antony Spawforth,Esther Eidinow

Publisher: OUP Oxford

ISBN: 0191016764

Category: History

Page: 912

View: 3415

What did the ancient Greeks eat and drink? What role did migration play? Why was emperor Nero popular with the ordinary people but less so with the upper classes? Why (according to ancient authors) was Oedipus ('with swollen foot') so called? For over 2,000 years the civilizations of ancient Greece and Rome have captivated our collective imagination and provided inspiration for so many aspects of our lives, from culture, literature, drama, cinema, and television to society, education, and politics. Many of the roots of the way life is lived in the West today can be traced to the ancient civilizations, not only in politics, law, technology, philosophy, and science, but also in social and family life, language, and art. Beautiful illustrations, clear and authoritative entries, and a useful chronology and bibliography make this Companion the perfect guide for readers interested in learning more about the Graeco-Roman world. As well as providing sound information on all aspects of classical civilization such as history, politics, ethics, morals, law, society, religion, mythology, science and technology, language, literature, art, and scholarship, the entries in the Companion reflect the changing interdisciplinary aspects of classical studies, covering broad thematic subjects, such as race, nationalism, gender, ethics, and ecology, confirming the impact classical civilizations have had on the modern world.
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A History of Heroes of the Imagination

Author: Daniel J. Boorstin

Publisher: Vintage

ISBN: 0307817210

Category: History

Page: 832

View: 6899

By piecing the lives of selected individuals into a grand mosaic, Pulitzer Prize-winning historian Daniel J. Boorstin explores the development of artistic innovation over 3,000 years. A hugely ambitious chronicle of the arts that Boorstin delivers with the scope that made his Discoverers a national bestseller. Even as he tells the stories of such individual creators as Homer, Joyce, Giotto, Picasso, Handel, Wagner, and Virginia Woolf, Boorstin assembles them into a grand mosaic of aesthetic and intellectual invention. In the process he tells us not only how great art (and great architecture and philosophy) is created, but where it comes from and how it has shaped and mirrored societies from Vedic India to the twentieth-century United States.
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Author: D. A. Russell

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 0521257808

Category: History

Page: 141

View: 2426

This book aims to fill the gap in our knowledge of declamation, 'a toy model of oratory' in which students composed and delivered deliberative and forensic practice speeches in character. Latin declamation has been well studied, but its Greek counterpart - also to large extent its model - has been hitherto less well known. The author sets the practice of declamation in its historical context; describes the conventional, though often bizarre, themes of the speeches; and discusses the declaimers' public performances, rhetorical theory and knowledge and use of classical literature and history.
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Author: Platon

Publisher: BoD – Books on Demand

ISBN: 3843015643

Category: Philosophy

Page: 40

View: 3277

Platon: Des Sokrates Verteidigung Entstanden nach dem Tod von Sokrates (399 v. Chr.), vermutlich zwischen 395 und 390 v. Chr. Erstdruck in: Hapanta ta tu Platônos, herausgegeben von H. Musuros, Venedig 1513. Erste deutsche Übersetzung durch J. S. Müller unter dem Titel »Socrates Schutz-Rede«, Hamburg 1739. Der Text folgt der Übersetzung durch Friedrich Daniel Ernst Schleiermacher von 1805. Vollständige Neuausgabe mit einer Biographie des Autors. Herausgegeben von Karl-Maria Guth. Berlin 2016. Textgrundlage ist die Ausgabe: Platon: Sämtliche Werke. Berlin: Lambert Schneider, [1940]. Die Paginierung obiger Ausgabe wird in dieser Neuausgabe als Marginalie zeilengenau mitgeführt. Umschlaggestaltung von Thomas Schultz-Overhage unter Verwendung des Bildes: Raffael, Die Schule von Athen (Detail). Gesetzt aus der Minion Pro, 11.5 pt.
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