Author: Steven Rolfes

Publisher: Pelican Publishing Company

ISBN: 1455621889

Category:

Page: N.A

View: 6321

In 1884, Cincinnati was wracked by three days of violence in one of the most destructive riots in American history. Nurtured by natural disasters, overtly corrupt governments, and politicians jockeying for power and sparked by murder and massive miscarriage of justice, the 10,000-person strong riot left more than fifty dead, hundreds injured, and the courthouse burned to the ground. The Cincinnati Courthouse Riot brought the end to one political regime and ushered in the rise of the notorious political boss George Cox, who ruled the city in a virtual dictatorship for the next thirty years. Thorough and insightful, The Cincinnati Courthouse Riot paints a vivid picture of a growing city during the Gilded Age. It examines the 1855 Know Nothing Riot in the city and its impact, the staggering effects of the Great Ohio River Flood, the frenzy surrounding two gruesome killings, and the milieu of political machination on the citizens of Cincinnati. The three nights of rioting are discussed in detail, including the role of the militia and their use of the Gatling gun on the rioters. With a deft hand, author Steven J. Rolfes weaves together the economic and political forces that erupted in mass violence and changed the face of a city.
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History of Rapid Transit

Author: Allen J. Singer

Publisher: Arcadia Publishing

ISBN: 9780738523149

Category: Transportation

Page: 128

View: 2470

Cincinnati emerged from a tumultuous 19th century as a growing metropolis committed to city planning. The most ambitious plan of the early twentieth century, the Cincinnati Subway, was doomed to failure. Construction began in 1920 and ended in 1927 when the money had run out. Today, two miles of empty subway tunnels still lie beneath Cincinnati, waiting to be used. The Cincinnati Subway tells the whole story, from the turbulent times in the 1880s to the ultimate failure of "Cincinnati's White Elephant." Along the way, the reader will learn about what was happening in Cincinnati during the growth of the subway-from the Courthouse Riots in 1884 to life in the Queen City during World War II.
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The Tulsa Race War and Its Legacy

Author: James S. Hirsch

Publisher: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt

ISBN: 0544374185

Category: History

Page: 368

View: 7294

A best-selling author investigates the causes of the twentieth century's deadliest race riot and how its legacy has scarred and shaped a community over the past eight decades. On a warm night in May 1921, thousands of whites, many deputized by the local police, swarmed through the Greenwood section of Tulsa, Oklahoma, killing scores of blacks, looting, and ultimately burning the neighborhood to the ground. In the aftermath, as many as 300 were dead, and 6,000 Greenwood residents were herded into detention camps. James Hirsch focuses on the de facto apartheid that brought about the Greenwood riot and informed its eighty-year legacy, offering an unprecedented examination of how a calamity spawns bigotry and courage and how it has propelled one community's belated search for justice. Tulsa's establishment and many victims strove to forget the events of 1921, destroying records pertaining to the riot and refusing even to talk about it. This cover-up was carried through the ensuing half-century with surprising success. Even so, the riot wounded Tulsa profoundly, as Hirsch demonstrates in a compelling combination of history, journalism, and character study. White Tulsa thrived, and the city became a stronghold of Klan activity as workingmen and high civic officials alike flocked to the Hooded Order. Meanwhile, Greenwood struggled as residents strove to rebuild their neighborhood despite official attempts to thwart them. As the decades passed, the economic and social divides between white and black worlds deepened. Through the 1960s and 1970s, urban renewal helped to finish what the riot had started, blighting Greenwood. Paradoxically, however, the events of 1921 saved Tulsa from the racial strife that befell so many other American cities in the 1960s, as Tulsans white and black would do almost anything to avoid a reprise of the riot. Hirsch brings the riot's legacy up to the present day, tracing how the memory of the massacre gradually revived as academics and ordinary citizens of all colors worked tirelessly to uncover evidence of its horrors. Hirsch also highlights Tulsa's emergence at the forefront of the burgeoning debate over reparations. RIOT AND REMEMBRANCE shows vividly, chillingly, how the culture of Jim Crow caused not only the grisly incidents of 1921 but also those of Rosewood, Selma, and Watts, as well as less widely known atrocities. It also addresses the cruel irony that underlies today's battles over affirmative action and reparations: that justice and reconciliation are often incompatible goals. Finally, Hirsch details how Tulsa may be overcoming its horrific legacy, as factions long sundered at last draw together.
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A Photographic Heritage of the Queen City

Author: Kevin Grace,Tom White

Publisher: Arcadia Publishing

ISBN: 9780738519555

Category: History

Page: 128

View: 5346

Cincinnati Revealed: A Photographic Heritage of the Queen City, features nearly 200 rarely seen photographs and vintage postcards. Through these striking images, together with the insightful text, authors Kevin Grace and Tom White take the reader on a unique visual tour of this historic river city. It is a tour well worth taking. Since its inception in 1788, Cincinnati has evolved from a brawling pioneer town to a thriving Midwest metropolis, experiencing rapid growth and unprecedented social and technological change. Highlighted in this volume are the city's spectacular architectural achievements, its centers of culture and learning, its hubs of industry and transportation, its legendary sports tradition, its diverse neighborhoods, and, above all, the spirit of its citizenry.
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History of Rapid Transit

Author: Allen J. Singer

Publisher: Arcadia Publishing

ISBN: 9780738523149

Category: Transportation

Page: 128

View: 6193

Cincinnati emerged from a tumultuous 19th century as a growing metropolis committed to city planning. The most ambitious plan of the early twentieth century, the Cincinnati Subway, was doomed to failure. Construction began in 1920 and ended in 1927 when the money had run out. Today, two miles of empty subway tunnels still lie beneath Cincinnati, waiting to be used. The Cincinnati Subway tells the whole story, from the turbulent times in the 1880s to the ultimate failure of "Cincinnati's White Elephant." Along the way, the reader will learn about what was happening in Cincinnati during the growth of the subway-from the Courthouse Riots in 1884 to life in the Queen City during World War II.
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Massacre, Destruction, and the Tulsa Race Riot of 1921

Author: Tim Madigan

Publisher: Macmillan

ISBN: 1466848847

Category: History

Page: 304

View: 5733

On the morning of June 1, 1921, a white mob numbering in the thousands marched across the railroad tracks dividing black from white in Tulsa, Oklahoma, and obliterated a black community then celebrated as one of America's most prosperous. 34 square blocks of Tulsa's Greenwood community, known then as the Negro Wall Street of America, were reduced to smoldering rubble. And now, 80 years later, the death toll of what is known as the Tulsa Race Riot is more difficult to pinpoint. Conservative estimates put the number of dead at about 100 (75% of the victims are believed to have been black), but the actual number of casualties could be triple that. The Tulsa Race Riot Commission, formed two years ago to determine exactly what happened, has recommended that restitution to the historic Greenwood Community would be good public policy and do much to repair the emotional as well as physical scars of this most terrible incident in our shared past. With chilling details, humanity, and the narrative thrust of compelling fiction, The Burning will recreate the town of Greenwood at the height of its prosperity, explore the currents of hatred, racism, and mistrust between its black residents and neighboring Tulsa's white population, narrate events leading up to and including Greenwood's annihilation, and document the subsequent silence that surrounded the tragedy.
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Urban Politics in the Progressive Era

Author: Zane L. Miller

Publisher: Ohio State University Press

ISBN: 9780814208618

Category: History

Page: 301

View: 1344

"In documenting the changes Cincinnati experienced during the Progressive Era, Zane L. Miller provides a clear perspective on the processes of urbanization that transformed the American city. His focus is political because politics provided continuity amid the diversity of city life. The most important aspect of political continuity in Cincinnati and in other cities was "bossism," often depicted as an example of corruption, but which was in many cities part of the quest for a new urban order. In Cincinnati, Boss George B. Cox's machine was a response to the disorder of the times; interestingly, the machine actually helped to control disorder, paving the way for later reforms. Miller carefully explores both the nature and the significance of bossism, showing how it and municipal reform were both essential components of the modern urban political system."--BOOK JACKET.Title Summary field provided by Blackwell North America, Inc. All Rights Reserved
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A Biographical Dictionary

Author: Mary Sayre Haverstock,Jeannette Mahoney Vance,Brian L. Meggitt,Jeffrey Weidman,Oberlin College. Library

Publisher: Kent State University Press

ISBN: 9780873386166

Category: Art

Page: 1066

View: 7918

A three-volume guide to the early art and artists of Ohio. It includes coverage of fine art, photography, ornamental penmanship, tombstone carving, china painting, illustrating, cartooning and the execution of panoramas and theatrical scenery.
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An Encyclopedia of the State: History Both General and Local, Geography with Descriptions of Its Countries, Cities and Villages, Its Agricultural, Manufacturing, Mining and Business Development, Sketches of Eminent and Interesting Characters, Etc., with Notes of a Tour Over it in 1886. Illustrated by about 700 Engravings. Contrasting the Ohio of 1846 with 1886-90

Author: Henry Howe

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Ohio

Page: N.A

View: 9485

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The American Presidents Series: The 27th President, 1909-1913

Author: Jeffrey Rosen,John Morton Blum

Publisher: Times Books

ISBN: 0805069542

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 208

View: 1709

The only man to serve as president and chief justice, who approached every decision in constitutional terms, defending the Founders’ vision against new populist threats to American democracy William Howard Taft never wanted to be president and yearned instead to serve as chief justice of the United States. But despite his ambivalence about politics, the former federal judge found success in the executive branch as governor of the Philippines and secretary of war, and he won a resounding victory in the presidential election of 1908 as Theodore Roosevelt’s handpicked successor. In this provocative assessment, Jeffrey Rosen reveals Taft’s crucial role in shaping how America balances populism against the rule of law. Taft approached each decision as president by asking whether it comported with the Constitution, seeking to put Roosevelt’s activist executive orders on firm legal grounds. But unlike Roosevelt, who thought the president could do anything the Constitution didn’t forbid, Taft insisted he could do only what the Constitution explicitly allowed. This led to a dramatic breach with Roosevelt in the historic election of 1912, which Taft viewed as a crusade to defend the Constitution against the demagogic populism of Roosevelt and Woodrow Wilson. Nine years later, Taft achieved his lifelong dream when President Warren Harding appointed him chief justice, and during his years on the Court he promoted consensus among the justices and transformed the judiciary into a modern, fully equal branch. Though he had chafed in the White House as a judicial president, he thrived as a presidential chief justice.
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How Amateur Sleuths Are Solving America’s Coldest Cases

Author: Deborah Halber

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN: 1451657595

Category: Computers

Page: 304

View: 8512

Citing tens of thousands of missing persons, unidentified remains, and unsolved crimes in America, an introduction to amateur crime solving reveals how everyday concerned citizens can access online resources to help solve cold cases.
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The Summer of 1919 and the Awakening of Black America

Author: Cameron McWhirter

Publisher: Henry Holt and Company

ISBN: 9781429972932

Category: History

Page: 368

View: 4327

A narrative history of America's deadliest episode of race riots and lynchings After World War I, black Americans fervently hoped for a new epoch of peace, prosperity, and equality. Black soldiers believed their participation in the fight to make the world safe for democracy finally earned them rights they had been promised since the close of the Civil War. Instead, an unprecedented wave of anti-black riots and lynchings swept the country for eight months. From April to November of 1919, the racial unrest rolled across the South into the North and the Midwest, even to the nation's capital. Millions of lives were disrupted, and hundreds of lives were lost. Blacks responded by fighting back with an intensity and determination never seen before. Red Summer is the first narrative history written about this epic encounter. Focusing on the worst riots and lynchings—including those in Chicago, Washington, D.C., Charleston, Omaha and Knoxville—Cameron McWhirter chronicles the mayhem, while also exploring the first stirrings of a civil rights movement that would transform American society forty years later.
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Toward Civil War

Author: David Grimsted

Publisher: Oxford University Press on Demand

ISBN: 0195172817

Category: History

Page: 372

View: 9227

This history of mob violence in antebellum America explores the two distinct reactions such violence produced. In the South, widespread rioting quelled both the public and private questioning of slavery; in the North, milder, more controlled riots generally encouraged sympathy for the anti-slavery movement. Grimsted shows that in these opposing reactions we can clearly see traces of the social division that ultimately led to the Civil War.
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How Two Honor Roll Students Foiled the Feds and Built a Drug Empire

Author: Kevin Deutsch

Publisher: St. Martin's Press

ISBN: 1250110041

Category: True Crime

Page: 288

View: 2188

In 2015, Baltimore plunged into the worst American riots in recent history. In the chaos, two high school honor-roll students, “Brick” and “Wax, used their smarts, computer skills, ambition and gang connections to change the world of illegal drugs forever. With their gang associates, they looted pharmacies and robbed dealers, stealing over one million doses of prescription narcotics and heroin with a street value of more than $100 million. “Brick” and “Wax” were not going to sell drugs on corners; they used location-based technology and encrypted messaging software to dispatch ordered drugs via delivery drivers—an Uber-like service that eliminated street deals and easily tapped phones. They were soon supplying cities along the East Coast, creating a whole new class of opioid addicts with the FBI and DEA trailing in their wake. To ensure their supply of drugs did not run out, the teens formed an alliance with members of the Sinaloa cartel, headed by El Chapo. Veteran Newsday crime reporter Kevin Deutsch has been reporting on the ground in drug-ravaged neighborhoods for over a year. He’s seen the bodies. Across America, thousands are dying from opioid overdoses. This middle-class crisis has been well documented, but the inner cities, where families are being swallowed up by addiction, have been ignored. Deutsch brings us into this underworld, where social unrest and cutting-edge technology allow criminals to seed the next wave of dysfunction and despair.
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Author: T. Adams Upchurch

Publisher: Scarecrow Press

ISBN: 9780810862999

Category: History

Page: 320

View: 1136

The Gilded Age was an important three-decade period in American history. It was a time of transition, when the United States began to recover from its Civil War and post-war rebuilding phase. It was as a time of progress in technology and industry, of regression in race relations, and of stagnation in politics and foreign affairs. It was a time when poor southerners began farming for a mere share of the crop rather than for wages, when pioneers settled in the harsh land and climate of the Great Plains, and when hopeful prospectors set out in search of riches in the gold fields out West. The Historical Dictionary of the Gilded Age relates the history of the major events, issues, people, and themes of the American "Gilded Age" (1869-1899). This period of unprecedented economic growth and technical advancement is chronicled in this reference and includes a chronology, an introductory essay, a bibliography, and hundreds of cross-referenced dictionary entries.
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