Author: Melissa Barden Dowling

Publisher: University of Michigan Press

ISBN: 9780472115150

Category: History

Page: 366

View: 8780

This book explores the formation of clemency as a human and social value in the Roman Empire.
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Classical, Judaic, and Christian

Author: Charles L. Griswold,David Konstan

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 0521119480

Category: History

Page: 260

View: 4505

In this book, eminent scholars of classical antiquity and ancient and medieval Judaism and Christianity explore the nature and place of forgiveness in the pre-modern Western world. They discuss whether the concept of forgiveness, as it is often understood today, was absent, or at all events more restricted in scope than has been commonly supposed, and what related ideas (such as clemency or reconciliation) may have taken the place of forgiveness. An introductory chapter reviews the conceptual territory of forgiveness and illuminates the potential breadth of the idea, enumerating the important questions a theory of the subject should explore. The following chapters examine forgiveness in the contexts of classical Greece and Rome; the Hebrew Bible, the Talmud, and Moses Maimonides; and the New Testament, the Church Fathers, and Thomas Aquinas.
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Refigurations of Masculinity in Luke-Acts

Author: Brittany E. Wilson

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 019026649X

Category: Religion

Page: 360

View: 7800

New Testament scholars typically assume that the men who pervade the pages of Luke's two volumes are models of an implied "manliness." Scholars rarely question how Lukan men measure up to ancient masculine mores, even though masculinity is increasingly becoming a topic of inquiry in the field of New Testament and its related disciplines. Drawing especially from gender-critical work in classics, Brittany Wilson addresses this lacuna by examining key male characters in Luke-Acts in relation to constructions of masculinity in the Greco-Roman world. Of all Luke's male characters, Wilson maintains that four in particular problematize elite masculine norms: namely, Zechariah (the father of John the Baptist), the Ethiopian eunuch, Paul, and, above all, Jesus. She further explains that these men do not protect their bodily boundaries nor do they embody corporeal control, two interrelated male gender norms. Indeed, Zechariah loses his ability to speak, the Ethiopian eunuch is castrated, Paul loses his ability to see, and Jesus is put to death on the cross. With these bodily "violations," Wilson argues, Luke points to the all-powerful nature of God and in the process reconfigures--or refigures--men's own claims to power. Luke, however, not only refigures the so-called prerogative of male power, but he refigures the parameters of power itself. According to Luke, God provides an alternative construal of power in the figure of Jesus and thus redefines what it means to be masculine. Thus, for Luke, "real" men look manifestly unmanly. Wilson's findings in Unmanly Men will shatter long-held assumptions in scholarly circles and beyond about gendered interpretations of the New Testament, and how they can be used to understand the roles of the Bible's key characters.
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The Women who influenced the History of Rome

Author: Paul Chrystal

Publisher: Fonthill Media

ISBN: N.A

Category: History

Page: N.A

View: 8745

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Author: Hans-Friedrich Mueller

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9780203463260

Category: History

Page: 288

View: 2166

First Published in 2004. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.
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Being a Clear and Concise History of All Nations, from the Earliest Ages Down to Modern Times, Including the Most Recent Important Events in All Parts of the World. A Full History of the United States. A Table of the Great Events of the World's History, in Chronological Order. A Table of the Kings and Rulers of the World, with the Dates in which They Reigned. And a Pronouncing Dictionary of Historical Proper Names

Author: Israel Smith Clare

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: World history

Page: 738

View: 2965

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Author: Lucius Annaeus Seneca,Susanna Braund

Publisher: Oxford University Press on Demand

ISBN: 0199240361

Category: History

Page: 456

View: 5580

New translations of significant political writings of Seneca, the most important Stoic philosopher.
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Past, Present, and Future

Author: Thomas McGinn

Publisher: University of Michigan Press

ISBN: 047202857X

Category: History

Page: 367

View: 9908

Long a major element of classical studies, the examination of the laws of the ancient Romans has gained momentum in recent years as interdisciplinary work in legal studies has spread. Two resulting issues have arisen, on one hand concerning Roman laws as intellectual achievements and historical artifacts, and on the other about how we should consequently conceptualize Roman law. Drawn from a conference convened by the volume's editor at the American Academy in Rome addressing these concerns and others, this volume investigates in detail the Roman law of obligations—a subset of private law—together with its subordinate fields, contracts and delicts (torts). A centuries-old and highly influential discipline, Roman law has traditionally been studied in the context of law schools, rather than humanities faculties. This book opens a window on that world. Roman law, despite intense interest in the United States and elsewhere in the English-speaking world, remains largely a continental European enterprise in terms of scholarly publications and access to such publications. This volume offers a collection of specialist essays by leading scholars Nikolaus Benke, Cosimo Cascione, Maria Floriana Cursi, Paul du Plessis, Roberto Fiori, Dennis Kehoe, Carla Masi Doria, Ernest Metzger, Federico Procchi, J. Michael Rainer, Salvo Randazzo, and Bernard Stolte, many of whom have not published before in English, as well as opening and concluding chapters by editor Thomas A. J. McGinn.
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Author: Gerald N. Sandy

Publisher: Macmillan Reference USA

ISBN: 9780805764901

Category: History

Page: 148

View: 3990

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Author: Alaric Watson

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1134908148

Category: History

Page: 328

View: 8028

Aurelian and the Third Century provides a re-evaluation, in the light of recent scholarship, of the difficulties facing the Roman empire in the AD 260s and 270s, concentrating upon the reign of the Emperor Aurelian and his part in summoning them. With introduction examining the situation in the mid third century, the book is divided into two parts: * Part 1: deals chronologically with the military and political events of the period from 268 to 276 * Part 2: analyzes the other achievements and events of Aurelian's reign and assesses their importance. A key supplement to the study of the Roman Empire.
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Abridged Edition

Author: Edward Gibbon

Publisher: Modern Library

ISBN: 0307419762

Category: History

Page: 1312

View: 1331

Edited, abridged, and with a critical Foreword by Hans-Friedrich Mueller Introduction by Daniel J. Boorstin Illustrations by Giovanni Battista Piranesi Edward Gibbon’s masterpiece, which narrates the history of the Roman Empire from the second century A.D. to its collapse in the west in the fifth century and in the east in the fifteenth century, is widely considered the greatest work of history ever written. This abridgment retains the full scope of the original, but in a breadth comparable to a novel. Casual readers now have access to the full sweep of Gibbon’s narrative, while instructors and students have a volume that can be read in a single term. This unique edition emphasizes elements ignored in all other abridgments—in particular the role of religion in the empire and the rise of Islam.
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Author: Edward Gibbon

Publisher: Cosimo, Inc.

ISBN: 1605201278

Category: History

Page: 564

View: 3464

The History of the Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire is Edward Gibbon's magnum opus, written and published over a 13-year period beginning in 1776. It not only chronicles the events of the downfall starting with the end of the rule of Marcus Aurelius, but proposes a theory as to why Rome collapsed: the populace, Gibbon theorizes, lost its moral fortitude, its militaristic will, and its sense of civic duty. History is considered a classic in world literature, and Gibbon is sometimes called the first "modern historian" for his insistence upon using primary sources for his research. Many scholars today still use his highly regarded work as reference. In this fifth of seven volumes, readers will find Chapter 45 ("State of Italy Under the Lombards") through Chapter 51 ("Conquests by the Arabs"), which cover the reign of Justin II; the Lombards' conquest of Italy; the Franks' conquest of Italy; the reign of Tiberius II; the life of Gregory the Great; and the rules of Phocas and Heraclius; the development of Christianity in the Eastern Roman Empire and the councils of Ephesus, Chalcedon, and Nice; the Greek emperors of Constantinople; the rule of Charlemagne of France and the division of his empire upon his death; and the clash between the Arabs and the Eastern Roman Empire. English parliamentarian and historian EDWARD GIBBON (1737-1794) attended Magdelan College, Oxford for 14 months before his father sent him to Lausanne, Switzerland, where he continued his education. He published Essai sur l'tude de la Littrature (1761) and other autobiographical works, including Mmoire Justificatif pour servir de Rponse l'Expos, etc. de la Cour de France (1779).
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