Decolonizing Practice

Author: Peter Schmidt,Innocent Pikirayi

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1317220749

Category: Social Science

Page: 324

View: 691

This volume provides new insights into the distinctive contributions that community archaeology and heritage make to the decolonization of archaeological practice. Using innovative approaches, the contributors explore important initiatives which have protected and revitalized local heritage, initiatives that involved archaeologists as co-producers rather than leaders. These case studies underline the need completely reshape archaeological practice, engaging local and indigenous communities in regular dialogue and recognizing their distinctive needs, in order to break away from the top-down power relationships that have previously characterized archaeology in Africa. Community Archaeology and Heritage in Africa reflects a determined effort to change how archaeology is taught to future generations. Through community-based participatory approaches, archaeologists and heritage professionals can benefit from shared resources and local knowledge; and by sharing decision-making with members of local communities, archaeological inquiry can enhance their way of life, ameliorate their human rights concerns, and meet their daily needs to build better futures. Exchanging traditional power structures for research design and implementation, the examples outlined in this volume demonstrate the discipline’s exciting capacity to move forward to achieve its potential as a broader, more accessible, and more inclusive field.
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Unveiling Local Research and Development Initiatives

Author: Peter R. Schmidt

Publisher: Taylor & Francis

ISBN: 1351980920

Category: Social Science

Page: 288

View: 4223

This volume provides a powerful alternative to the Western paradigms that have governed archaeological inquiry and heritage studies in Africa. Community-based Heritage Research in Africa boldly shifts focus away from top-down community engagements, usually instigated by elite academic and heritage institutions, to examine locally initiated projects. Schmidt explores how and why local research initiatives, which are often motivated by rapid culture change caused by globalization, arose among the Haya people of western Tanzania. In particular, the trauma of HIV/AIDS resulted in the loss of elders who had performed oral traditions and rituals at sacred places, the two most recognized forms of heritage among the Haya as well as distinct alternatives to the authorized heritage discourse favored around the globe. Examining three local initiatives, Schmidt draws on his experience as an anthropologist invited to collaborate and co-produce with the Haya to provide a poignant rendering of the successes, conflicts, and failures that punctuated their participatory community research efforts. This frank appraisal privileges local voices and focuses attention on the unique and important contributions that such projects can make to the preservation of regional history. Through this blend of personalized narrative and analytical examination, the book provides fresh insights into African archaeology and heritage studies.
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Who Cares?

Author: Webber Ndoro,Shadreck Chirikure,Janette Deacon

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1315472953

Category: Social Science

Page: 258

View: 5062

Managing Heritage in Africa provides a wide-ranging, up-to-date synthesis of heritage management practice in Africa, covering a broad spectrum of heritage issues such as archaeology, living traditions, sacred sites, heritage of pain (slavery), international conventions cultural landscapes, heritage in conflict areas and heritage versus development. Dealing with both intangible and tangible heritage, Managing Heritage in Africa gives an informative insight into some of the major issues and approaches to contemporary heritage management in Africa and situates the challenges facing heritage practitioners.
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Decolonising Theory and Practice

Author: Claire Smith,H. Martin Wobst

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1134391552

Category: Social Science

Page: 432

View: 1904

With case studies from North America to Australia and South Africa and covering topics from archaeological ethics to the repatriation of human remains, this book charts the development of a new form of archaeology that is informed by indigenous values and agendas. This involves fundamental changes in archaeological theory and practice as well as substantive changes in the power relations between archaeologists and indigenous peoples. Questions concerning the development of ethical archaeological practices are at the heart of this process.
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A Reader on Decolonization

Author: Margaret Bruchac,Siobhan Hart,H Martin Wobst

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1315426765

Category: Social Science

Page: 436

View: 4752

This comprehensive reader on indigenous archaeology shows that collaboration has become a key part of archaeology and heritage practice worldwide. Collaborative projects and projects directed and conducted by indigenous peoples independently have become standard, community concerns are routinely addressed, and oral histories are commonly incorporated into research. This volume begins with a substantial section on theoretical and philosophical underpinnings, then presents key articles from around the globe in sections on Oceania, North America, Mesoamerica and South America, Africa, Asia, and Europe. Editorial introductions to each piece con­textualize them in the intersection of archaeology and indigenous studies. This major collection is an ideal text for courses in indigenous studies, archaeology, heritage management, and related fields.
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Author: Jane Lydon,Uzma Z Rizvi

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1315427680

Category: Social Science

Page: 525

View: 3076

This essential handbook explores the relationship between the postcolonial critique and the field of archaeology, a discipline that developed historically in conjunction with European colonialism and imperialism. In aiding the movement to decolonize the profession, the contributors to this volume—themselves from six continents and many representing indigenous and minority communities and disadvantaged countries—suggest strategies to strip archaeological theory and practice of its colonial heritage and create a discipline sensitive to its inherent inequalities. Summary articles review the emergence of the discipline of archaeology in conjunction with colonialism, critique the colonial legacy evident in continuing archaeological practice around the world, identify current trends, and chart future directions in postcolonial archaeological research. Contributors provide a synthesis of research, thought, and practice on their topic. The articles embrace multiple voices and case study approaches, and have consciously aimed to recognize the utility of comparative work and interdisciplinary approaches to understanding the past. This is a benchmark volume for the study of the contemporary politics, practice, and ethics of archaeology. Sponsored by the World Archaeological Congress
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engaging descendant communities

Author: John Stephen Colwell-Chanthaphonh,Thomas John Ferguson

Publisher: Altamira Press

ISBN: 9780759110540

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 317

View: 8556

In Collaboration in Archaeological Practice, prominent archaeologists reflect on their experiences involving collaboration with descendant communities (peoples whose ancestors are the subject of archaeological research).
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Author: Peter Ridgway Schmidt

Publisher: School for Advanced Research on the

ISBN: N.A

Category: Social Science

Page: 287

View: 8557

Africa, the birthplace of humanity, offers an untold wealth of information about the human past -- untold because of severe limits on archaeological research there. This volume pulls the veil from previous representations of African archaeology to show that archaeologists working in Africa are still very much in the grip of patronage systems planted during the colonial era, making it difficult for local communities to see cultural benefits from the work. Moreover, innovative young African archaeologists suffer from disdain and marginalization from their senior colleagues. Yet these problems and the tensions between Euro-American practices and African sensibilities and ways of thinking and knowing create a vital opportunity to rejuvenate the practice and theory of archaeology in Africa. Postcolonial Archaeologies in Africa features some of the foremost archaeologists from Africa and the United States and presents cutting-edge proposals for how archaeology in Africa today can be made more relevant to the needs of local communities, from enhancing cultural capacity to cope with AIDS to promoting economic development and human rights claims, generating locally rooted intellectual paradigms, and preventing the degradation of heritage resources. The authors highlight research programs that offer positive alternatives to colonial-era theories and explore African quests for identities forged from within, the struggle to find meaning in African practice of archaeology, and how to make archaeology work for individual and collective well-being.
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thebanische Privatgräber des Neuen Reiches

Author: Sigrid Hodel-Hoenes

Publisher: Wissenschaftliche Buchgesellschaft Abt. Verlag

ISBN: N.A

Category: History

Page: 256

View: 2009

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Rassismus in Conrads "Herz der Finsternis"

Author: Chinua Achebe

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9783895810282

Category: African literature

Page: 107

View: 9801

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Multidisciplinary approaches to Decolonised Zimbabwean pasts

Author: Manyanga, Munyaradzi,Chirikure, Shadreck

Publisher: Langaa RPCIG

ISBN: 9956764191

Category: Social Science

Page: 500

View: 3700

Dissatisfaction has matured in Africa and elsewhere around the fact that often, the dominant frameworks for interpreting the continent's past are not rooted on the continent's value system and philosophy. This creates knowledge that does not make sense especially to local communities. The big question therefore is can Africans develop theories that can contribute towards the interpretation of the African past, using their own experiences? Framed within a concept revision substrate, the collection of papers in this thought provoking volume argues for concept revision as a step towards decolonizing knowledge in the post-colony. The various papers powerfully expose that 'cleansed' knowledge is not only locally relevant: it is also locally accessible and globally understandable.
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Author: Gerry Wait,Ibrahima Thiaw

Publisher: Archaeopress Archaeology

ISBN: 9781784919948

Category: Art

Page: 116

View: 1071

This book presents the results of the Environmental and Social Impact Assessment (ESIA) project in the southwest region of the Republic of the Congo, undertaken to identify and evaluate cultural resources which might need further investigation. The study also reports on ethnographic surveys considering intangible cultural heritage.
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Register des Archivs

Author: Alf Lüdtke,Tobias Nanz

Publisher: Vandenhoeck & Ruprecht

ISBN: 3847002368

Category: History

Page: 137

View: 7018

Laute, Bilder und Texte bezeichnen unterschiedliche Materialien und mediale Formate, die in Archiven gelagert und von Interessierten genutzt und ausgewertet werden. Die Beiträgerinnen und Beiträger dieses Bandes sondieren anhand alltagshistorischer Studien die Praktiken der Akteure im Umgang mit diesen Spuren und Überresten und decken dabei ein breites Medienspektrum ab: Tonaufnahmen, Manuskripte, Fotografien, Filme, Videos sowie all die vergessenen Dinge, die in den Mappen und Kartons der Archive gelagert sind. Dabei geraten auch die Unterschiede zwischen ›kolonialen‹ und ›indigenen‹ Archiven sowie die monopolistische Stellung der westlich geprägten Wissenschaften in den Blick.
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25 Case Studies in Research Practice

Author: Stephen W. Silliman

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN: 1119240506

Category: History

Page: 280

View: 7514

Bringing together 25 case studies from archaeological projects worldwide, Engaging Archaeology candidly explores personal experiences, successes, challenges, and even frustrations from established and senior archaeologists who share invaluable practical advice for students and early-career professionals engaged in planning and carrying out their own archaeological research. With engaging chapters, such as 'How Not to Write a PhD Thesis: Some Real-Life Lessons from 1990s Michigan and Prehistoric Italy" and "Accidentally Digging Central America's Earliest Village", aspiring and established archaeologist readers are transported to the desks, digs, and data-labs of the authors, learning the skills, tricks of the trade, and potential pit-falls. Case studies collectively span many regions, time periods, issues, methods, and materials. From the pre-Columbian Andes to Viking Age Iceland, North America to the Middle East, Medieval Ireland to remote North Australia, and Europe to Africa and India, Engaging Archaeology is packed with rich, first-hand source material. Unique and thoughtful, Stephen W. Silliman's guide is an essential course book for early-stage researchers, advanced undergraduates, and new graduate students, as well as those teaching and mentoring. It will also be insightful and enjoyable reading for veteran archaeologists.
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caring for Maori meeting houses outside New Zealand

Author: Dean Sully,University College, London. Institute of Archaeology

Publisher: Left Coast Pr

ISBN: 9781598743098

Category: Art

Page: 272

View: 2771

This book argues for an important shift in cultural heritage conservation, away from a focus on maintaining the physical fabric of material culture toward the impact that conservation work has on peopleas lives. In doing so, it challenges the commodification of sacred objects and places by western conservation thought and attempts to decolonize conservation practice. To do so, the authors examine conservation activities at Maori maraeameeting housesalocated in the US, Germany, and England and contrasts them with changes in marae conservation in New Zealand. A key case study is the Hinemihi meeting house, transported to England in the 1890s where it was treated as a curiosity by visitors to Clandon Park for over a century, and more recently as a focal point of cultural activity for UK Maori communities. Recent efforts to include various Maori stakeholder communities in the care of this sacred structure is a key example of community based conservation that can be replicated in heritage practice around the world.
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die Geschichte eines der großen, fast vergessenen Menschheitsverbrechen

Author: Adam Hochschild

Publisher: Klett-Cotta

ISBN: 9783608919738

Category:

Page: 494

View: 2282

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