The Patron's Oeuvre

Author: Dale V. Kent

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 0300081286

Category: Art

Page: 537

View: 568

"Cosimo de'Medici (1389-1464), the fabulously wealthy banker who became the leading citizen of Florence in the fifteenth century, spent lavishly as the city's most important patron of art and literature. This book is the first comprehensive examination of the whole body of works of art and architecture commissioned by Cosimo and his sons. By looking closely at this spectacular group of commissions, we gain an entirely new picture of their patron, and of the patron's point of view. Recurrent themes in the commissions - from Fra Angelico's San Marco altarpiece to the Medici palace - indicate the main interests to which Cosimo's patronage gave visual expression. Dale Kent offers new insights and perspectives on the individual objects comprising the Medici oeuvre by setting them within the context of civic and popular culture in early Renaissance Florence, and of Cosimo's life as the leader of the Medici lineage and the dominant force in the governing elite." "From the wealth of available documentation illuminating Cosimo de'Medici's life, the author considers how his own experience influenced his patronage; how the culture of Renaissance Florence provided a common idiom for the patron, his artists, and his audience; what he preferred and intended as a patron; and how focussing on his patronage of art alters the image of him that is based on his roles as banker and politician. Cosimo was as much a product as a shaper of Florentine society, Kent concludes. She identifies civic patriotism and devotion as the main themes of his oeuvre and argues that religious imperatives may well have been more important than political ones in shaping the art for which he was responsible and its reception."--BOOK JACKET.Title Summary field provided by Blackwell North America, Inc. All Rights Reserved
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Author: K. Dorothea Ewart

Publisher: Cosimo, Inc.

ISBN: 1596059311

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 256

View: 2812

In many ways, he was the father of the Renaissance, or at least its midwife, taking the reins of Florence in 1433 and leading it to a cultural apex that has, perhaps, yet to be rivaled by any municipality since. Cosimo De' Medici, master of a city-state, diplomat and statesman, ruled a Florence that was "in miniature an empire," as this 1899 biography calls it, where painters and thinkers created new movements of art, philosophy, and science that, in turn, created our world today. This is a fascinating look at the man who shepherded Florence through that dramatic period, from his foreign policy that nurtured the city's cosmopolitanism to his fostering of a social and cultural environment in which literature and art flourished.
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Author: Janet Cox-Rearick

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN: 9780520074804

Category: Art

Page: 445

View: 4206

"Cox-Rearick indicates that the iconographic program of the chapel was, from its initiation, linked to an astonishing degree to the fortunes-actual and anticipated-of the young Duke Cosimo and that the successive changes in the chapel were occasioned by political events and by revised and increasingly ambitious Medici pretensions."--Malcolm Campbell, University of Pennsylvania
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Florence and the Plot against the Medici

Author: Lauro Martines

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780195348439

Category: History

Page: 320

View: 1767

One of the world's leading historians of Renaissance Italy brings to life here the vibrant--and violent--society of fifteenth-century Florence. His disturbing narrative opens up an entire culture, revealing the dark side of Renaissance man and politician Lorenzo de' Medici. On a Sunday in April 1478, assassins attacked Lorenzo and his brother as they attended Mass in the cathedral of Florence. Lorenzo scrambled to safety as Giuliano bled to death on the cathedral floor. April Blood moves outward in time and space from that murderous event, unfolding a story of tangled passions, ambition, treachery, and revenge. The conspiracy was led by one of the city's most noble clans, the Pazzi, financiers who feared and resented the Medici's swaggering new role as political bosses--but the web of intrigue spread through all of Italy. Bankers, mercenaries, the Duke of Urbino, the King of Naples, and Pope Sixtus IV entered secretly into the plot. Florence was plunged into a peninsular war, and Lorenzo was soon fighting for his own and his family's survival. The failed assassination doomed the Pazzi. Medici revenge was swift and brutal--plotters were hanged or beheaded, innocents were hacked to pieces, and bodies were put out to dangle from the windows of the government palace. All remaining members of the larger Pazzi clan were forced to change their surname, and every public sign or symbol of the family was expunged or destroyed. April Blood offers us a fresh portrait of Renaissance Florence, where dazzling artistic achievements went side by side with violence, craft, and bare-knuckle politics. At the center of the canvas is the figure of Lorenzo the Magnificent--poet, statesman, connoisseur, patron of the arts, and ruthless "boss of bosses." This extraordinarily vivid account of a turning point in the Italian Renaissance is bound to become a lasting work of history.
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Author: John M. Najemy

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN: 1405178469

Category: History

Page: 528

View: 9721

In this history of Florence, distinguished historian John Najemy discusses all the major developments in Florentine history from 1200 to 1575. Captures Florence's transformation from a medieval commune into an aristocratic republic, territorial state, and monarchy Weaves together intellectual, cultural, social, economic, religious, and political developments Academically rigorous yet accessible and appealing to the general reader Likely to become the standard work on Renaissance Florence for years to come
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Conspicuous Commissions in Italian Renaissance Art

Author: Jonathan K. Nelson,Richard J. Zeckhauser

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN: 0691161941

Category: Architecture

Page: 256

View: 9120

An analysis of Italian Renaissance art from the perspective of the patrons who made 'conspicuous commissions', this text builds on three concepts from the economics of information - signaling, signposting, and stretching - to develop a systematic methodology for assessing the meaning of patronage.
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faction in Florence, 1426-1434

Author: Dale V. Kent

Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA

ISBN: N.A

Category: History

Page: 389

View: 3806

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Author: Frederick Hartt,David G. Wilkins

Publisher: Prentice Hall Press

ISBN: N.A

Category: Art

Page: 696

View: 7166

'History of Italian Renaissance Art' provides readers with an understanding of this pivotal period, incorporating research and current art historical thinking while also maintaining the integrity of the story that Frederick Hartt first told so enthusiastically many years ago. Choosing to retain Frederick Hartt's traditional framework, David Wilkins has introduced a number of changes. Newly added works of art demonstrate the diversity of the period. Secular pieces such as a cassone with its original framework largely intact, an early desco da parto made for the Medici family, two examples of majolica dinnerware, along with a new series of portraits of patrons and personalities of the period have been selected because they enrich our knowledge of the context within which these works were created. Other illustrations have been added to enhance our understanding of important Renaissance works. These include views of architecture and of large fresco cycles and sculptures that remain in situ. There is also a bibliography that provides a guide for further reading about artists and key topics.
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Wives and Widows in Italy, C. 1300-1550

Author: Catherine King

Publisher: Manchester University Press

ISBN: 9780719052897

Category: Art

Page: 272

View: 8432

This book considers how writing over the period of a century justified and was affected by the introduction and extension of British domination of India, thus demonstrating the link between writing and the ideological, economic and political climate and debates.
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The Emergence of Italian City Communes in the Twelfth Century

Author: Chris Wickham

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN: 1400865824

Category: History

Page: 320

View: 6756

Amid the disintegration of the Kingdom of Italy in the eleventh and twelfth centuries, a new form of collective government—the commune—arose in the cities of northern and central Italy. Sleepwalking into a New World takes a bold new look at how these autonomous city-states came about, and fundamentally alters our understanding of one of the most important political and cultural innovations of the medieval world. Chris Wickham provides richly textured portraits of three cities—Milan, Pisa, and Rome—and sets them against a vibrant backcloth of other towns. He argues that, in all but a few cases, the elites of these cities and towns developed one of the first nonmonarchical forms of government in medieval Europe, unaware that they were creating something altogether new. Wickham makes clear that the Italian city commune was by no means a democracy in the modern sense, but that it was so novel that outsiders did not know what to make of it. He describes how, as the old order unraveled, the communes emerged, governed by consular elites "chosen by the people," and subject to neither emperor nor king. They regularly fought each other, yet they grew organized and confident enough to ally together to defeat Frederick Barbarossa, the German emperor, at the Battle of Legnano in 1176. Sleepwalking into a New World reveals how the development of the autonomous city-state took place, which would in the end make possible the robust civic culture of the Renaissance.
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Author: Niccolò Machiavelli

Publisher: Courier Corporation

ISBN: 0486138534

Category: Philosophy

Page: 384

View: 5199

This influential study contrasts the government of ancient Rome with that of the author's 16th-century contemporaries. Topics include establishing a republic's internal structure, conducting warfare, and exhibiting leadership qualities.
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secular women patrons of art in Renaissance Italy

Author: Sheryl E. Reiss,David G. Wilkins

Publisher: Truman State Univ Pr

ISBN: N.A

Category: Art

Page: 339

View: 3515

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Author: William Hood

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9780300057348

Category: Art

Page: 338

View: 6882

Fra Angelico's fresco paintings at the Dominican priory of San Marco are among the best-loved works of Italian art, yet they have been oddly neglected by art historians. In this beautiful book, William Hood analyzes the newly cleaned frescoes at San Marco, setting them against the background of fifteenth-century Florentine artistic, political, cultural, and religious history. Hood discusses the ideals, daily rituals, and pictorial traditions of the Dominican order - especially the reformed or Observant branch to which Fra Angelico belonged. He presents new material on traditions of religious art, altarpiece design and imagery, and the decoration of chapter rooms and cloisters. Hood compares Fra Angelico's work at San Marco to earlier Dominican altarpieces and to his other altarpieces for Dominican buildings in Siena, Pisa, Prato, and Florence, pointing out both the traditional elements and the startling novelty of the San Marco altarpiece. Similarly, by comparing San Marco to other Florentine fresco cycles, he illuminates the originality of the cloister and chapter-house of San Marco. Hood's discussion of San Marco follows an itinerary through the church and adjoining convent buildings, beginning with the high altarpiece and ending with the corridor paintings - especially the exquisite Annunciation in the corridor of the north dormitory. Throughout, he analyzes Angelico's use of color, his technique in fresco and tempera, the way he solved specific visual problems, and how his paintings affected fifteenth-century viewers. This beautiful book will be an important addition to our understanding of fifteenth-century art and of artistic and cultural practices.
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Humanist Observers of Painting in Italy and the Discovery of Pictorial Composition, 1350-1450

Author: Michael Baxandall

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780198173878

Category: Art

Page: 185

View: 2465

`This handsomely illustrated book is an original attempt to make clear how much the art of the orators and the painters in the Renaissance had in common ... Extremely important for the history of art.' Neo-Latin News
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50 B.C. to A.D. 284

Author: Ramsay MacMullen

Publisher: Yale University Press

ISBN: 9780300027020

Category: History

Page: 212

View: 9020

In this interesting and suggestive book, Professor MacMullen views anew an important and rather neglected aspect of Roman social relations. A perceptive and sensitive interpreter, he has drawn widely upon the scattered and unorganized evidence about the poorer classes, rural and urban, in much of the Roman Empire, and presents a fresh picture of their conditions, attitudes, and aims. -T. Robert S. Broughton
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Author: Henry Ashby Turner

Publisher: Yale University Press

ISBN: 9780300053470

Category: History

Page: 269

View: 6182

A revised edition of "The Two Germanies since 1945" which discussed the partitioning of Germany after World War II and the formation of the two states. This revised text covers unification - the exodus of East Germans to the Federal Republic, breaching of the Berlin Wall and overthrow of communism.
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September 1939 - December 1941

Author: John Lukacs

Publisher: Yale University Press

ISBN: 9780300089158

Category: History

Page: 576

View: 6998

This absorbing study of the first phase of World War II tells not only how events happened but why. Eminent historian Lukacs presents an extraordinary narrative of these two years, followed by a detailed sequential analysis of the political, military, and intellectual relations and events.
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