Author: Marie Coleman

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9780716527909

Category: History

Page: 276

View: 3557

This book gives an insight into the Irish revolution, and seeks to explain how it came about, through a study of events at a regional level. County Longford was the scene of Sinn F����in���­s crucial by-election victories in 1917 and an active area of IRA operations during the War of Independence. Sinn F����in���­s victory in the by-election acted as a catalyst for the rapid spread of the movement throughout Longford in the latter half of 1917. Marie Coleman discusses the political aspect of the revolution by examining the importance of administrative charges as Sinn F����in and D���·il .ireann usurped the functions of the courts and local government, and then goes on to describe the military side of the revolution. A narrative account of the War of Independence and Civil War in Longford is followed by a personnel profile of the Volunteers and Cumann na mBan respectively, outlining their activities at various stages of the independence campaign, and examining their motivation for joining these organisations and engaging in violent activity.
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Author: Marie Coleman

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1317801474

Category: History

Page: 176

View: 7293

This concise study of Ireland’s revolutionary years charts the demise of the home rule movement and the rise of militant nationalism that led eventually to the partition of Ireland and independence for southern Ireland. The book provides a clear chronology of events but also adopts a thematic approach to ensure that the role of women and labour are examined, in addition to the principal political and military developments during the period. Incorporating the most recent literature on the period, it provides a good introduction to some of the most controversial debates on the subject, including the extent of sectarianism, the nature of violence and the motivation of guerrilla fighters. The supplementary documents have been chosen carefully to provide a wide-ranging perspective of political views, including those of constitutional nationalists, republicans, unionists, the British government and the labour movement. The Irish Revolution 1916-1923 is ideal for students and interested readers at all levels, providing a diverse range of primary sources and the tools to unlock them.
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Author: Joost Augusteijn

Publisher: Macmillan International Higher Education

ISBN: 1137239832

Category: History

Page: 272

View: 2549

Was there an Irish Revolution, and - if so - what kind of revolution was it? What motivated revolutionaries and those who supported them? How was the war fought and ended? What have been the repercussions for unionists, women and modern Irish politics? These questions are here addressed by leading historians of the period through both detailed assessments of specific incidents and wide-ranging analysis of key themes. The Irish Revolution, 1913-1923 provides the most up-to-date answers to, and debate on, the fundamental questions relating to this formative period in Irish history. Clear coverage of the historiography and a detailed chronology make this book ideal for classroom use. The Irish Revolution is essential reading for students and scholars of modern Ireland, and for all those interested in the study of revolution.
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Author: Diarmaid Ferriter

Publisher: The Overlook Press

ISBN: 1468315412

Category: History

Page: 528

View: 2006

“An excellent, scholarly” (Library Journal) examination of the Irish revolutionary period from 1913-1923 Renowned Irish historian Diarmaid Ferriter presents a fresh look at the Irish revolutionary period from 1913-1923, drawing from newly available historical sources as well as the testimonies of the people who lived and fought through this extraordinary period. Ferriter highlights the gulf between rhetoric and reality in politics and violence, the role of women, the battle for material survival, the impact of key Irish unionist and republican leaders, as well as conflicts over health, land, religion, law and order, and welfare.
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Politics, Class, and Conflict

Author: G. Foster

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 1137425709

Category: History

Page: 315

View: 5782

The Irish Civil War and Society sheds new light on the social currents shaping the Irish Civil War, from the 'politics of respectability' behind animosities and discourses; to the intersection of social conflicts with political violence; to the social dimensions of the war's messy aftermath.
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Author: Alvin Jackson

Publisher: OUP Oxford

ISBN: 0191667609

Category: History

Page: 640

View: 5162

The study of Irish history, once riven and constricted, has recently enjoyed a resurgence, with new practitioners, new approaches, and new methods of investigation. The Oxford Handbook of Modern Irish History represents the diversity of this emerging talent and achievement by bringing together 36 leading scholars of modern Ireland and embracing 400 years of Irish history, uniting early and late modernists as well as contemporary historians. The Handbook offers a set of scholarly perspectives drawn from numerous disciplines, including history, political science, literature, geography, and the Irish language. It looks at the Irish at home as well as in their migrant and diasporic communities. The Handbook combines sets of wide thematic and interpretative essays, with more detailed investigations of particular periods. Each of the contributors offers a summation of the state of scholarship within their subject area, linking their own research insights with assessments of future directions within the discipline. In its breadth and depth and diversity, The Oxford Handbook of Modern Irish History offers an authoritative and vibrant portrayal of the history of modern Ireland.
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Author: Robert Lynch

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN: 1441168613

Category: History

Page: 192

View: 2543

Revolutionary Ireland, 1912-25 analyses the main events in Ireland from the initial crisis over the Third Home Rule Bill in 1912 to the consolidation of partition Ulster with the settling of the boundary issue in 1925. Written with particular reference to the needs of students in further and higher education, each chapter contains an easy to follow narrative, guides to key reading on the topic, sample essay and examination questions and links to web resources. The main text is supported by an appendix of contemporary sources and a range of additional information including a chronology of significant events, maps, a glossary of key terms and an extensive bibliography. This comprehensive text will allow students to get to grips with this turbulent and fascinating period of modern Irish history.
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Atlas of the Irish Revolution

Author: John Crowley,Donal Ó Drisceoil,Mike Murphy

Publisher: NYU Press

ISBN: 9781479834280

Category: History

Page: 750

View: 3649

The Atlas of the Irish Revolution is a definitive resource that brings to life this pivotal moment in Irish history and nation-building. Published to coincide with the centenary of the Easter Rising, this comprehensive and visually compelling volume brings together all of the current research on the revolutionary period, with contributions from leading scholars from around the world and from many disciplines. A chronological and thematically organized treatment of the period serves as the core of the Atlas, enhanced by over 400 color illustrations, maps and photographs. This academic tour de force illuminates the effects of the Revolution on Irish culture and politics, both past and present, and animates the period for anyone with a connection to or interest in Irish history.
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Politics and Society, 1910-23

Author: Tomás Kenny

Publisher: Four Courts PressLtd

ISBN: 9781846822933

Category: History

Page: 54

View: 3474

In Ireland, the period of 1910 to 1923 was one of dramatic change: change of governments, of states, of political attitudes, and in day-to-day life. It is unmatched as a turbulent period in national history, and at a local level in County Galway. Despite this, there has been no local survey of the period until now. Galway from 1910 to 1923 often seems paradoxical. A highly disruptive county with many of the island's poorest inhabitants, Galway appeared ready to erupt once politics were radicalized in the absence of emigration during the years of the Great War (1914-1918). Yet revolution - as seen in Tipperary, Cork, and elsewhere - was never to materialize. By any standards of assessment, Galway saw only low intensity fighting throughout the revolutionary years. However, there is no denying that the contribution of Galway - small in many respects - cannot be dismissed from the annals of the War of Independence. The same is true of the Civil War. (Series: Maynooth Studies in Local History - Number 95)
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Provincial Ireland 1910-1916

Author: Michael Wheatley

Publisher: OUP Oxford

ISBN: 9780191556838

Category: History

Page: 308

View: 2376

John Redmond's constitutional, parliamentary, Irish Party went from dominating Irish politics to oblivion in just four years from 1914-1918. The goal of limited Home Rule, peacefully achieved, appeared to die with it. Given the speed of the party's collapse, its death has been seen as inevitable. Though such views have been challenged, there has been no detailed study of the Irish Party in the last years of union with Britain, before the world war and the Easter Rising transformed Irish politics. Through a study of five counties in provincial Ireland - Leitrim, Longford, Roscommon, Sligo, and Westmeath - that history has now been written. Far from being 'rotten', the Irish Party was representative of nationalist opinion and still capable of self-renewal and change. However, the Irish nationalism at this time was also suffused with a fierce anglophobia and sense of grievance, defined by its enemies, which rapidly came to the fore, first in the Home Rule crisis and then in the war. Redmond's project, the peaceful attainment of Home Rule, simply could not be realised.
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Author: Brian Hughes

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 1781383545

Category: History

Page: N.A

View: 4770

This book examines the grass-roots relationship between the Irish Republican Army (IRA) and the civilian population during the Irish Revolution. It is primarily concerned with the attempts of the militant revolutionaries to discourage, stifle, and punish dissent among the local populations in which they operated, and the actions or inactions by which dissent was expressed or implied. Focusing on the period of guerilla war against British rule from c. 1917 to 1922, it uncovers the acts of 'everyday' violence, threat, and harm that characterized much of the revolutionary activity of this period. Moving away from the ambushes and assassinations that have dominated much of the discourse on the revolution, the book explores low-level violent and non-violent agitation in the Irish town or parish. The opening chapter treats the IRA's challenge to the British state through the campaign against servants of the Crown - policemen, magistrates, civil servants, and others - and IRA participation in local government and the republican counter-state. The book then explores the nature of civilian defiance and IRA punishment in communities across the island before turning its attention specifically to the year that followed the 'Truce' of July 1921. This study argues that civilians rarely operated at either extreme of a spectrum of support but, rather, in a large and fluid middle ground. Behaviour was rooted in local circumstances, and influenced by local fears, suspicions, and rivalries. IRA punishment was similarly dictated by community conditions and usually suited to the nature of the perceived defiance. Overall, violence and intimidation in Ireland was persistent, but, by some contemporary standards, relatively restrained.
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A History of the Irish Hospitals Sweepstake, 1930-87

Author: Marie Coleman

Publisher: Univ College Dublin Press

ISBN: N.A

Category: History

Page: 302

View: 1652

The Irish Hospitals Sweepstake, initially established to provide money for voluntary hospitals in Dublin, provided funding for Irish hospitals for over fifty years. But that was not the whole story. This book reveals scandals, skullduggery, and gangsterism, which all played their part in the sweepstakes, exposing the blind eyes that were turned to its shortcomings and exploring the extent to which these failings ultimately damaged the Irish health services by postponing necessary reforms.
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A Short History and Genealogical Guide with a Select List of Medal Awards and Casualties

Author: Jim Herlihy

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9781846826153

Category:

Page: 288

View: 6697

This new, revised and expanded edition brings back into print an excellent resource for those interested in the history of the RIC and the revolutionary period generally. In the period 1816 to 1922 some 85,000 men served in the RIC and its predecessor forces. Information on all these policemen is available, constituting a quarry for their descendants in Ireland, the US and elsewhere. The book consists of chapters on the history of policing in Ireland (to illustrate the type of men in the Force, their background and their lifestyle etc.), followed by a section on 'Tracing your ancestors in the RIC'. New appendices to this edition identify members of the RIC who were rewarded for their service during the Young Ireland Rising, 1848; the Fenian Rising, 1867; the Easter Rising, 1916; and the War of Independence, 1919-21. Also members of the RIC who volunteered for service in the Mounted Staff Corps and the Commissariat during the Crimean War; members who served as drivers and orderlies on secondment to the Irish Hospital in the South African War in 1900; and members who served in the British Army in the First World War are identified. RIC recipients of the King George V, Coronation (Police) Medal, 1911; the Constabulary Medal; and the Kings Police Medal are listed, as are ex-RIC men who transferred to the Royal Ulster Constabulary in 1922 and received additional bravery medals. [Subject: 19th Century History, 20th Century History, Policing, Genealogy & Archives, Ireland]
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Author: Peter Hart

Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA

ISBN: 0199252580

Category: History

Page: 274

View: 2838

Between 1916 and 1923, Ireland experienced rebellion and mass mobilization, guerrilla and civil war, partition and ethnic conflict, and the transfer of power from British to Irish governments. The essays in The I.R.A. at War propose a new history of this Irish revolution: one that encompasses the whole of the island as well as Britain, all of the violence and its consequences, and the entire period from the Easter Rising to the end of the Civil War. When did the revolution start and when did it end? Why was it so violent and why were some areas so much worse than others? Why did the I.R.A. mount a terror campaign in England and Scotland but refuse to assassinate British politicians? Where did it get its guns? Was it democratic? What kind of people became guerrillas? What kind of people did they kill? Were Protestants ethnically cleansed from southern Ireland? Did a pogrom take place against Belfast Catholics? These and other questions are addressed using extensive new data on those involved and their actions, including the first complete figures for victims of the revolution. These events have never been numbered among the world's great revolutions, but in fact Irish republicans were global pioneers. Long before Mao or Tito, Sinn Fein and the Irish Republican Army were the first to use a popular political front to build a parallel underground state coupled with sophisticated guerrilla and international propaganda and fund-raising campaigns. Ireland'sis also perhaps the best documented revolution in modern history, so that almost any question can be answered, from who joined the I.R.A. to who ordered the assassination of Sir Henry Wilson. The intimacy and precision with which we are able to reconstruct and analyse what happened make this a key site for understanding not just Irish, but world, history.
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British Government and Irish Revolution, 1910-1922

Author: Ronan Fanning

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9780571297405

Category: Great Britain

Page: 423

View: 9449

Fatal Path by Ronan Fanning is a powerful new history of Ireland, covering the decade of the Great War and the Easter Rising.
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A Reassessment of the Life and Legacy of Eamon de Valera

Author: Diarmaid Ferriter

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 396

View: 445

"Of course, I wrote most of the Constitution myself. I remember hesitating for a long time over the American Presidential system. But it wouldn't have done - we were too trained in English democracy to sit down under a dictatorship, which is what the American system really is - Ministers not responsible to parliament - that would never do. Besides, I wanted to prepare a nice quiet job without too much work for my old age.... Still, I admit I was tempted - look at the way de Gaulle rules France...absolute rule...very efficient." - Eamon de Valera, Churchill College Cambridge Archives, Gilchrist Papers *** Eamon de Valera has often been characterized as a stern, unbending, devious, and divisive Irish politician. But how valid is this caricature? In Judging Dev, author Diarmaid Ferriter re-examines de Valera's life and legacy. The book contains an in-depth analysis of the impact of de Valera and includes many previously unpublished key letters, documents, and photographs from the National Archives of Ireland and the University College Dublin, School of History and Archives to chronicle the extraordinary career of the most significant politician of modern Irish history and his role in the history of the Irish state.
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Long Fellow, Long Shadow

Author: Tim Pat Coogan

Publisher: Head of Zeus Ltd

ISBN: 1784975370

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 784

View: 2134

Eamon de Valera – 'The Long Fellow' – remains a towering presence whose shadow still falls over Irish life. The history of Ireland for much of the twentieth century is the history of de Valera. From the 1916 Rising, the troubled Treaty negotiations and the Civil War, right through to his retirement after a longer period in power than any other 20th-century leader, Eamon de Valera has both defined and divided Ireland. He was directly responsible for the Irish Constitution, Fianna Fail (the largest Irish political party) and the Irish Press Group. He helped create a political church-state monolith with continuing implications for Northern Ireland, the social role of women, the Irish language and the whole concept of an Irish nation. Many of the challenges he confronted are still troubling the peace of Ireland and of Britain, and some of the problems are his legacy. Tim Pat Coogan's comprehensive study of this political giant is a major addition to the history of Irish-British relationships.
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Author: Jane Ohlmeyer

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1108651054

Category: History

Page: N.A

View: 5006

This volume offers fresh perspectives on the political, military, religious, social, cultural, intellectual, economic, and environmental history of early modern Ireland and situates these discussions in global and comparative contexts. The opening chapters focus on 'Politics' and 'Religion and War' and offer a chronological narrative, informed by the re-interpretation of new archives. The remaining chapters are more thematic, with chapters on 'Society', 'Culture', and 'Economy and Environment', and often respond to wider methodologies and historiographical debates. Interdisciplinary cross-pollination - between, on the one hand, history and, on the other, disciplines like anthropology, archaeology, geography, computer science, literature and gender and environmental studies - informs many of the chapters. The volume offers a range of new departures by a generation of scholars who explain in a refreshing and accessible manner how and why people acted as they did in the transformative and tumultuous years between 1550 and 1730.
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Author: Gemma Clark

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1139916505

Category: History

Page: N.A

View: 5914

Everyday Violence in the Irish Civil War presents an innovative study of violence perpetrated by and against non-combatants during the Irish Civil War, 1922–3. Drawing from victim accounts of wartime injury as recorded in compensation claims, Dr Gemma Clark sheds new light on hundreds of previously neglected episodes of violence and intimidation - ranging from arson, boycott and animal maiming to assault, murder and sexual violence - that transpired amongst soldiers, civilians and revolutionaries throughout the period of conflict. The author shows us how these micro-level acts, particularly in the counties of Limerick, Tipperary and Waterford, served as an attempt to persecute and purge religious and political minorities and to force redistribution of land. Clark also assesses the international significance of the war, comparing the cruel yet arguably restrained violence that occurred in Ireland with the brutality unleashed in other European conflict zones.
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