Author: Tim G. Parkin

Publisher: Johns Hopkins Univ Pr

ISBN: N.A

Category: History

Page: 225

View: 6372

"A clear, up-to-date, attractively priced guide to its subject, supplemented by extensive notes and bibliography... Invaluable as an introduction to the demography of the Roman Empire."-- Times Literary Supplement. "[Parkin] relentlessly unmasks authoritatively stated hypotheses masquerading as fact."-- Greece & Rome. Ancient Society and History.
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New Insights and Approaches

Author: Claire Holleran,April Pudsey

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1139499637

Category: History

Page: N.A

View: 5746

Through a series of case studies this book demonstrates the wide-ranging impact of demographic dynamics on social, economic and political structures in the Graeco-Roman world. The individual case studies focus on fertility, mortality and migration and the roles they played in various aspects of ancient life. These studies – drawn from a range of populations in Athens and Attica, Rome and Italy, and Graeco-Roman Egypt – illustrate how new insights can be gained by applying demographic methods to familiar themes in ancient history. Methodological issues are addressed in a clear, straightforward manner with no assumption of prior technical knowledge, ensuring that the book is accessible to readers with no training in demography. The book marks an important step forward in ancient historical demography, affirming both the centrality of population studies in ancient history and the contribution that antiquity can make to population history in general.
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Population Dynamics in an Ancient Conquest Society 201 BCE-14 CE

Author: Saskia Hin

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1107003938

Category: History

Page: 406

View: 9850

Investigates demographic behaviour and population trends in Italy during the emergence of the Roman Empire. Unites literary and epigraphic sources with demographic theory, archaeological surveys, climatic and skeletal evidence, models and comparative data. Also features a chapter on climate change in Roman times.
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Author: Roger S. Bagnall,Bruce W. Frier

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9780521025966

Category: History

Page: 392

View: 1243

By studying the three hundred census returns that survive on papyri from Roman Egypt, the authors reconstruct the patterns of mortality, marriage, fertility and migration that are likely to have prevailed in Roman Egypt.
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Author: Walter Scheidel

Publisher: BRILL

ISBN: 9789004115255

Category: History

Page: 242

View: 1695

This volume provides the first comprehensive survey of current methods, progress and debates in Roman demography, and offers new insights into key issues of population change and reproductive behaviour in the Roman world from Italy to Egypt.
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A Cultural and Social History

Author: Tim G. Parkin

Publisher: JHU Press

ISBN: 9780801871283

Category: History

Page: 495

View: 4094

Classical authors such as Cicero and Plutarch would have us believe that the elderly were revered, active citizens of ancient Rome. But upon closer inspection, it appears that older people may not have enjoyed as respected or as powerful a place in Roman society as has been supposed. In this highly original work, Tim Parkin considers the many issues related to aging and the aged in the classical Roman world. Drawing on both his expertise in demography and his knowledge of ancient history and literature, he coaxes new insights from a variety of sources, including legal documents on the "rules of age," representations of old age in classical literature, epigraphic evidence from tombstones, Greco-Roman medical texts, and papyri from Roman Egypt. Analyzing such diverse sources, he offers valuable new views of old age—not only of men in public life but of men and women in marriage, sexual relationships, and the family. Parkin detects a general lack of interest in old age per se in the early empire, which in itself may provide clues regarding the treatment of older people in the Roman world. Noting that privileges granted to the aged generally took the form of exemptions from duties rather than positive benefits, he argues that the elderly were granted no privileged status or ongoing social roles. At the same time they were both permitted—and expected—to continue to participate actively in society for as long as they were able. An innovative and ambitious work, Old Age in the Roman World paints a compelling, heretofore unseen picture of what it meant to grow old in antiquity. As a work of both social and cultural history, it broadens our knowledge of the ancient world and encourages us to reexamine our treatment of older people today.
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Author: Richard P. Saller

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9780521599788

Category: History

Page: 249

View: 1571

This innovative study of the patriarchy belies the accepted notion of the father figure as tyrannical and exploitative.
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Author: David S. Potter

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1134694849

Category: History

Page: 792

View: 1052

The Roman Empire at Bay is the only one volume history of the critical years 180-395 AD, which saw the transformation of the Roman Empire from a unitary state centred on Rome, into a new polity with two capitals and a new religion—Christianity. The book integrates social and intellectual history into the narrative, looking to explore the relationship between contingent events and deeper structure. It also covers an amazingly dramatic narrative from the civil wars after the death of Commodus through the conversion of Constantine to the arrival of the Goths in the Roman Empire, setting in motion the final collapse of the western empire. The new edition takes account of important new scholarship in questions of Roman identity, on economy and society as well as work on the age of Constantine, which has advanced significantly in the last decade, while recent archaeological and art historical work is more fully drawn into the narrative. At its core, the central question that drives The Roman Empire at Bay remains, what did it mean to be a Roman and how did that meaning change as the empire changed? Updated for a new generation of students, this book remains a crucial tool in the study of this period.
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Author: David Stone Potter,D. J. Mattingly

Publisher: University of Michigan Press

ISBN: 9780472085682

Category: History

Page: 353

View: 2525

Life, Death, and Entertainment gives those who have a general interest in Roman antiquity a starting point informed by the latest developments in scholarship for understanding the extraordinary range of Roman society. Family structure, gender identity, food supply, religion, and entertainment are all crucial to an understanding of the Roman world. As views of Roman history have broadened in recent decades to encompass a wider range of topics, the need has grown for a single volume that can offer a starting point for these diverse subjects, for readers of all backgrounds. This collection fills such a need by uniting a series of general introductions on each of these topics for the non-specialist. Each essay brings readers into contact with broadly ranging evidence, as well as with a wide variety of approaches that are needed to study basic questions about the Roman world. Essays explore the Roman family, gender definition, demography, Roman food supply, Roman religion, and the wide variety of public entertainments throughout the empire. The volume brings together an unparalleled range of methodologies and topics. It will enable the modern reader to understand the Roman world in all its complexity. The general reader will welcome this approachable and timely text. Contributors to the volume include Greg Aldrete, Hazel Dodge, Bruce W. Frier, Maud Gleason, Ann Hanson, David Mattingly, and David Potter. D. S. Potter is Arthur F. Thurnau Professor of Greek and Latin, University of Michigan. D. J. Mattingly is Professor of Roman Archaeology, University of Leicester.
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Author: Peter Hunt

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN: 1405188065

Category: History

Page: 264

View: 7085

"The general introduction will provide the political and historical context for Greek and Roman slavery and briefly survey the institutions themselves. Each chapter will open with a section on "Background and Methodology." These will orient the reader for the chapter's "Case Studies," one from Greece and one from Rome--and sometimes a Hellenistic case--that would constitute the bulk of the book"--
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Author: Beryl Rawson

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN: 9781444390759

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 664

View: 3178

A Companion to Families in the Greek and Roman Worlds draws from both established and current scholarship to offer a broad overview of the field, engage in contemporary debates, and pose stimulating questions about future development in the study of families. Provides up-to-date research on family structure from archaeology, art, social, cultural, and economic history Includes contributions from established and rising international scholars Features illustrations of families, children, slaves, and ritual life, along with maps and diagrams of sites and dwellings Honorable Mention for 2011 Single Volume Reference/Humanities & Social Sciences PROSE award granted by the Association of American Publishers
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A Sourcebook

Author: Tim Parkin,Arthur Pomeroy

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1134091249

Category: History

Page: 408

View: 6194

This Sourcebook contains a comprehensive collection of sources on the topic of the social history of the Roman world during the late Republic and the first two centuries AD. Designed to form the basis for courses in Roman social history, this excellent resource covers original translations from sources such as inscriptions, papyri, and legal texts. Topics include: social inequality and class games, gladiators and attitudes to violence the role of slaves in Roman society economy and taxation the Roman legal system the Roman family and gender roles. Including extensive explanatory notes, maps and bibliographies, this Sourcebook is the ideal resource for all students and teachers embarking on a course in Roman social history.
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Author: Richard Duncan-Jones

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1107149797

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 240

View: 7931

Explores the impact of social standing on the careers of senators and knights in the Roman Empire.
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Author: Thomas A. J. McGinn

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780199882946

Category: History

Page: 436

View: 3095

This is a study of the legal rules affecting the practice of female prostitution at Rome approximately from 200 B.C. to A.D. 250. It examines the formation and precise content of the legal norms developed for prostitution and those engaged in this profession, with close attention to their social context. McGinn's unique study explores the "fit" between the law-system and the socio-economic reality while shedding light on important questions concerning marginal groups, marriage, sexual behavior, the family, slavery, and citizen status, particularly that of women.
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Author: Zvi Yavetz

Publisher: Transaction Publishers

ISBN: 9781412834131

Category: History

Page: 182

View: 9667

Enormous numbers of slaves were absorbed into Roman society from the third century B.C. onwards. Mainly enslaved prisoners of war, they transformed the quality of life in the Roman Empire beyond recognition. In this anthology the author offers a complete collection of Greek and Latin sources in an English translation which deal with the great slave rebellions in the second and first centuries B.C. In a postscript Zvi Yavetz surveys the controversy on slaves and slavery from the French Revolution to our own days, with an emphasis on the debate between Marxists and non-Marxists. The book is intended for specialists and generalists alike, including those who have had no previous classical education, but could after delving in sources concern themselves with one of the most intriguing problems in world history. Zvi Yavetz holds the Lessing Chair of Roman History at Tel Aviv University, Israel, and is distinguished visiting professor at Queens College of the City University of New York. He is the author of many books in Hebrew, French and German on Roman history among which are Julius Caesar and His Public Image and Plebs and Princips.
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Author: Clifford J. Rogers,Kelly DeVries,John France

Publisher: Boydell & Brewer Ltd

ISBN: 1843839369

Category: History

Page: 253

View: 9522

Highlights "the range and richness of scholarship on medieval warfare, military institutions, and cultures of conflict that characterize the field". History 95 (2010)
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Author: Eve D'Ambra

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 0521818397

Category: History

Page: 215

View: 3259

This book examines the daily lives of Roman women by focusing on the mundane and less celebrated aspects of daily life - family and household, work and leisure, worship and social obligations - of women of different social ranks. Using a variety of sources, including literary texts, letters, inscriptions, coins, tableware, furniture, and the fine arts, from the late Republic to the high Imperial period, Eve D'Ambra shows how these sources serve as objects of social analysis, rather than simply as documents that recreate how life was lived. She also demonstrates how texts and material objects take part in shaping realities and what they can tell us about the texture of lives and social attitudes, if not emotions of women in Roman antiquity.
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Author: Suzanne Dixon

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1134563183

Category: History

Page: 304

View: 538

It can be difficult to hear the voices of Roman children, women and slaves, given that most surviving texts of the period are by elite adult men. This volume redresses the balance. An international collection of expert contributors go beyond the usual canon of literary texts, and assess a vast range of evidence - inscriptions, burial data, domestic architecture, sculpture and the law, as well as Christian and dream-interpretation literature. Topics covered include: * child exposure and abandonment * children in imperial propaganda * reconstructing lower-class families * gender, burial and status * epitaphs and funerary monuments * adoption and late parenthood. The result is an up-to-date survey of some of the most exciting avenues currently being explored in Roman social history.
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Outsiders Within

Author: Christian Laes

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 0521897467

Category: History

Page: 334

View: 9074

Illuminates the lives of the 'forgotten' children of ancient Rome and draws parallels and contrasts with contemporary society.
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A History of Malaria in Ancient Italy

Author: Robert Sallares

Publisher: Oxford University Press on Demand

ISBN: 0199248508

Category: History

Page: 341

View: 4259

Malaria and Rome is the first comprehensive study of malaria in ancient Italy since the research of the distinguished Italian malariologist Angelo Celli in the early twentieth century. It demonstrates the importance of disease patterns and history in understanding the demography of ancient populations. Robert Sallares argues that malaria became increasingly prevalent in Roman times in central Italy as a result of ecological change and alterations to the physical landscapesuch as deforestation. Making full use of contemporary sources and comparative material from other periods, he shows that malaria had a significant effect on mortality rates in certain regions of Roman Italy.Robert Sallares incorporates all the important advances made in many relevant fields since Celli's time. These include recent geomorphological research on the evolution of the coastal environments of Italy that were notorious for malaria in the past, biomolecular research on the evolution of malaria, ancient DNA as a new source of evidence for malaria in antiquity, the differentiation of mosquito species that permits understanding of the phenomenon of anophelism without malaria (where theclimate is optimal for malaria and Anopheles mosquitoes are present, but there is no malaria), and recent medical research on the interactions between malaria and other diseases.The argument develops with a careful interplay between the modern microbiology of the disease and the Greek and Latin literary texts. Both contemporary sources and comparative material from other periods are used to interpret the ancient sources. In addition to the medical and demographic effects on the Roman population, Malaria and Rome considers the social and economic effects of malaria, for example on settlement patterns and on agricultural systems. Robert Sallares also examinesthe varied human responses to and interpretations of malaria in antiquity, ranging from the attempts at rational understanding made by the Hippocratic authors and Galen to the demons described in the magical papyri.
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