Author: Graham Pullin

Publisher: MIT Press

ISBN: 0262162555

Category: Design

Page: 341

View: 6810

How design for disabled people and mainstream design could inspire, provoke, and radically change each other.
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Author: Graham Pullin

Publisher: MIT Press (MA)

ISBN: 9780262516747

Category: Design

Page: 341

View: 1648

How design for disabled people and mainstream design could inspire, provoke, and radically change each other.
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Symbols, Space, and Society

Author: Elizabeth Guffey

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN: 135000426X

Category: Design

Page: 240

View: 8306

Designing Disability traces the emergence of an idea and an ideal – physical access for the disabled – through the evolution of the iconic International Symbol of Access (ISA). The book draws on design history, material culture and recent critical disability studies to examine not only the development of a design icon, but also the cultural history surrounding it. Infirmity and illness may be seen as part of human experience, but 'disability' is a social construct, a way of thinking about and responding to a natural human condition. Elizabeth Guffey's highly original and wide-ranging study considers the period both before and after the introduction of the ISA, tracing the design history of the wheelchair, a product which revolutionised the mobility needs of many disabled people from the 1930s onwards. She also examines the rise of 'barrier-free architecture' in the reception of the ISA, and explores how the symbol became widely adopted and even a mark of identity for some, especially within the Disability Rights Movement. Yet despite the social progress which is inextricably linked to the ISA, a growing debate has unfurled around the symbol and its meanings. The most vigorous critiques today have involved guerrilla art, graffiti and studio practice, reflecting new challenges to the relationship between design and disability in the twenty-first century.
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A Guide to Universal Usability for Web Designers

Author: Sarah Horton

Publisher: New Riders

ISBN: 0133067343

Category: Computers

Page: 288

View: 4538

In just over a decade, the Web has evolved from an experimental tool for a limited community of technically inclined people into a day-to-day necessity for millions upon millions of users. Today’s¿Web designers must consider not only the content needs of the sites they create, but also the wide range of additional needs their users may have: for example, those with physical or cognitive disabilities, those with slow modems or small screens, and those with limited education or familiarity with the Web. Bestselling author Sarah Horton argues that simply meeting the official standards and guidelines for Web accessibility is not enough. Her goal is universal usability, and in Access by Design: A Guide to Universal Usability for Web Designers, Sarah describes a design methodology¿ that addresses accessibility requirements but then goes beyond. As a result, designers learn how to optimize page designs to work more effectively for more users, disabled or not. Working through each of the main functional features of Web sites, she provides clear principles for using HTML and CSS to deal with elements such as text, forms, images, and tables, illustrating each with an example drawn from the real world. Through these guidelines, Sarah makes a convincing case that good design principles benefit all users of the Web. In this book you will find: Clear principles for using HTML and CSS to design functional and accessible Web sites Best practices for each of the main elements of Web pages—text, forms, images, tables, frames, links, interactivity, and page layout Seasoned advice for using style sheets that provide flexibility to both designer and user without compromising usability Illustrations of actual Web sites, from which designers can model their own pages Instructions for providing keyboard accessibility, flexible layouts, and user-controlled environments Practical tips on markup, and resources
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At the Intersection of Technical Communication and Disability Studies

Author: Lisa Meloncon

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1351865250

Category: Psychology

Page: 622

View: 3110

Veterinary medicine has long been recognized as one of the more neglected areas of medical history. One of the main stumbling blocks to research is the lack of comprehensive information regarding the survival and availability of primary source material. Veterinary Medicine: A Guide to Historical Sources redresses these issues for the first time, offering researchers an unparalleled tool with which to approach the subject. The book opens with a brief history of veterinary medicine and the veterinary profession from the fourteenth to the beginning of the twenty first centuries, identifying the key dates and events that shaped their development. There then follows a chapter on the nature and uses of the records covered by the book, outlining the types of records found, the type of information they contain and their likely uses by different types of researcher. A brief user's guide then explains how to use the book. After these preliminary sections, comes the main body of the book, the lists of records. It is here that the various practices and institutions covered by the book are listed, together with the types of records they hold, the dates they cover and where they are kept. A short biographical history is also included with each entry where appropriate. Taken as a whole this volume will prove to be an invaluable aid for any scholar, researching the history of veterinary medicine in Britain.
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An alternative handbook on architecture, dis/ability and designing for everyday life

Author: Jos Boys

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1317693825

Category: Architecture

Page: 220

View: 6780

This ground-breaking book aims to take a new and innovative view on how disability and architecture might be connected. Rather than putting disability at the end of the design process, centred mainly on compliance, it sees disability – and ability – as creative starting points for the whole design process. It asks the intriguing question: can working from dis/ability actually generate an alternative kind of architectural avant-garde? To do this, Doing Disability Differently: explores how thinking about dis/ability opens up to critical and creative investigation our everyday social attitudes and practices about people, objects and space argues that design can help resist and transform underlying and unnoticed inequalities introduces architects to the emerging and important field of disability studies and considers what different kinds of design thinking and doing this can enable asks how designing for everyday life – in all its diversity – can be better embedded within contemporary architecture as a discipline offers examples of what doing disability differently can mean for architectural theory, education and professional practice aims to embed into architectural practice, attitudes and approaches that creatively and constructively refuse to perpetuate body 'norms' or the resulting inequalities in access to, and support from, built space. Ultimately, this book suggests that re-addressing architecture and disability involves nothing less than re-thinking how to design for the everyday occupation of space more generally.
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Universal Design and the Politics of Disability

Author: Aimi Hamraie

Publisher: U of Minnesota Press

ISBN: 1452955565

Category: Architecture

Page: 336

View: 2319

“All too often,” wrote disabled architect Ronald Mace, “designers don’t take the needs of disabled and elderly people into account.” Building Access investigates twentieth-century strategies for designing the world with disability in mind. Commonly understood in terms of curb cuts, automatic doors, Braille signs, and flexible kitchens, Universal Design purported to create a built environment for everyone, not only the average citizen. But who counts as “everyone,” Aimi Hamraie asks, and how can designers know? Blending technoscience studies and design history with critical disability, race, and feminist theories, Building Access interrogates the historical, cultural, and theoretical contexts for these questions, offering a groundbreaking critical history of Universal Design. Hamraie reveals that the twentieth-century shift from “design for the average” to “design for all” took place through liberal political, economic, and scientific structures concerned with defining the disabled user and designing in its name. Tracing the co-evolution of accessible design for disabled veterans, a radical disability maker movement, disability rights law, and strategies for diversifying the architecture profession, Hamraie shows that Universal Design was not just an approach to creating new products or spaces, but also a sustained, understated activist movement challenging dominant understandings of disability in architecture, medicine, and society. Illustrated with a wealth of rare archival materials, Building Access brings together scientific, social, and political histories in what is not only the pioneering critical account of Universal Design but also a deep engagement with the politics of knowing, making, and belonging in twentieth-century United States.
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Author: Alice Rawsthorn

Publisher: The Overlook Press

ISBN: 1468309307

Category: Design

Page: 288

View: 451

It is often said that we are living in a new golden age of design. Our gadgets, appliances, and cars are sleeker and more elegant than they’ve ever been; in our free time, we trawl the internet for pictures of flawless minimalist interiors; and even the great industrialist of our time—Steve Jobs—is admired more for his visual savvy than his technological inventiveness. And yet with Instagram and Pinterest at our fingers and great design more available—and more affordable—than ever, we’ve had no guidebook to this ever-fascinating field. Though it’s an inescapable part of our lives, there has been no single book that could, in one fell swoop, tell us everything we need to know about design. Enter Hello World. The design critic for the International Heard Tribune, Alice Rawsthorn has spent many years reckoning with the history of design and with its place in contemporary life, and Hello World is the extraordinary summation of her research and reporting. Rawsthorn takes us on a trip through design that ranges across continents and centuries, and wherever she goes, she discovers inspiring, thrilling examples of resourcefulness, inventiveness, and sheer vision. From the macabre symbol with which eighteenth-century pirates terrorized their victims into surrender, to one woman’s quest for the best prosthetic legs, to the evolution of the World Cup soccer ball, Hello World describes how warlords, scientists, farmers, hackers, activists, and professional designers have used the complex, often elusive process of design to different ends throughout history. Hailed as a “rapid-fire and illuminating ode to contemporary design” (Telegraph) and “an extremely readable tour of the subject” (Financial Times), Hello World is a major work that radically broadens our understanding of what design can mean, and explains how we can use it to make sense of our ever-changing universe.
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How Inclusion Shapes Design

Author: Kat Holmes

Publisher: MIT Press

ISBN: 0262038889

Category: Technology & Engineering

Page: 176

View: 7961

How inclusive methods can build elegant design solutions that work for all. Sometimes designed objects reject their users: a computer mouse that doesn't work for left-handed people, for example, or a touchscreen payment system that only works for people who read English phrases, have 20/20 vision, and use a credit card. Something as simple as color choices can render a product unusable for millions. These mismatches are the building blocks of exclusion. In Mismatch, Kat Holmes describes how design can lead to exclusion, and how design can also remedy exclusion. Inclusive design methods—designing objects with rather than for excluded users—can create elegant solutions that work well and benefit all. Holmes tells stories of pioneers of inclusive design, many of whom were drawn to work on inclusion because of their own experiences of exclusion. A gamer and designer who depends on voice recognition shows Holmes his “Wall of Exclusion,” which displays dozens of game controllers that require two hands to operate; an architect shares her firsthand knowledge of how design can fail communities, gleaned from growing up in Detroit's housing projects; an astronomer who began to lose her eyesight adapts a technique called “sonification” so she can “listen” to the stars. Designing for inclusion is not a feel-good sideline. Holmes shows how inclusion can be a source of innovation and growth, especially for digital technologies. It can be a catalyst for creativity and a boost for the bottom line as a customer base expands. And each time we remedy a mismatched interaction, we create an opportunity for more people to contribute to society in meaningful ways.
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Modern Histories of Prosthetics

Author: David Serlin

Publisher: NYU Press

ISBN: 9780814761977

Category: History

Page: 359

View: 5789

Of crucial strategic importance to both the British and the Continental Army, Staten Island was, for a good part of the American Revolution, a bastion of Loyalist support. With its military and political significance, Staten Island provides rich terrain for Phillip Papas's illuminating case study of the local dimensions of the Revolutionary War. Papas traces Staten Island's political sympathies not to strong ties with Britain, but instead to local conditions that favored the status quo instead of revolutionary change. With a thriving agricultural economy, stable political structure, and strong allegiance to the Anglican Church, on the eve of war it was in Staten Island's self-interest to throw its support behind the British, in order to maintain its favorable economic, social, and political climate. Over the course of the conflict, continual occupation and attack by invading armies deeply eroded Staten Island's natural and other resources, and these pressures, combined with general war weariness, created fissures among the residents of “that ever loyal island,” with Loyalist neighbors fighting against Patriot neighbors in a civil war. Papas’s thoughtful study reminds us that the Revolution was both a civil war and a war for independence—a duality that is best viewed from a local perspective.
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Author: Paul D. Q. Campbell

Publisher: Industrial Press Inc.

ISBN: 9780831130657

Category: Science

Page: 253

View: 6533

This book is for the industrial designer interested in the applications of plastics in products and industry. It explains how different plastics are processed, and it contains extensive examples of common and unusual plastic components and products with an explanation of how they are manufactured. Every year, more products are being replaced or augmented by the same product made from plastic, and this trend has resulted in much debate about the effectiveness of plastic replacements. Today's plastics can be designed to operate in all weather conditions and chemical surroundings. They can be economically produced for short run part production or readily adapted to high quantity production, and they can be cut, glued, tapped, or machined by traditional methods to suit design needs. Explains how to choose the best processing method, what fastening or joining methods can be used, and how to use the characteristics of a plastic to judge its suitability for an application. Covers all major contemporary molding processes. Discusses, in detail, important topics such as surface finish and special effects.
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A Practical Guide to Accessible, Innovative and User-Centred Design

Author: Hua Dong,John Clarkson,Roger Coleman,Dr Julia Cassim

Publisher: Gower Publishing, Ltd.

ISBN: 1409458113

Category: Design

Page: 268

View: 1008

Inclusive design not only ensures that products, services, interfaces and environments are easier to use for those with special needs or limitations, but in doing so also makes them better for everyone. Design for Inclusivity, written by a team that has pioneered inclusive design practice internationally, reviews the recent social trends and pressures that have pushed this subject to the fore, and assesses design responses to date in an international context. The authors make the business case for inclusive design and explain the formalisation of the approach in standards and legislation. The text includes case studies which describe transport, product development, IT and service projects, as well as industry-university collaborative projects, and highlights lessons that have been learned. This is very much a practical book. It offers tools, techniques, guidelines and signposts for the reader to key resources, as well as including advice on research methods, and working with users and industry partners.
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Author: Jos Boys

Publisher: Taylor & Francis

ISBN: 1317197178

Category: Architecture

Page: 318

View: 5798

Disability, Space, Architecture: A Reader takes a groundbreaking approach to exploring the interconnections between disability, architecture and cities. The contributions come from architecture, geography, anthropology, health studies, English language and literature, rhetoric and composition, art history, disability studies and disability arts and cover personal, theoretical and innovative ideas and work. Richer approaches to disability – beyond regulation and design guidance – remain fragmented and difficult to find for architectural and built environment students, educators and professionals. By bringing together in one place some seminal texts and projects, as well as newly commissioned writings, readers can engage with disability in unexpected and exciting ways that can vibrantly inform their understandings of architecture and urban design. Most crucially, Disability, Space, Architecture: A Reader opens up not just disability but also ability – dis/ability – as a means of refusing the normalisation of only particular kinds of bodies in the design of built space. It reveals how our everyday social attitudes and practices about people, objects and spaces can be better understood through the lens of disability, and it suggests how thinking differently about dis/ability can enable innovative and new kinds of critical and creative architectural and urban design education and practice.
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Amputation, Embodiment, and Prosthetic Technology

Author: Cassandra S. Crawford

Publisher: NYU Press

ISBN: 0814760872

Category: Social Science

Page: 314

View: 7788

Phantom limb pain is one of the most intractable and merciless pains ever known—a pain that haunts appendages that do not physically exist, often persisting with uncanny realness long after fleshy limbs have been traumatically, surgically, or congenitally lost. The very existence and “naturalness” of this pain has been instrumental in modern science’s ability to create prosthetic technologies that many feel have transformative, self-actualizing, and even transcendent power. In Phantom Limb, Cassandra S. Crawford critically examines phantom limb pain and its relationship to prosthetic innovation, tracing the major shifts in knowledge of the causes and characteristics of the phenomenon. Crawford exposes how the meanings of phantom limb pain have been influenced by developments in prosthetic science and ideas about the extraordinary power of these technologies to liberate and fundamentally alter the human body, mind, and spirit. Through intensive observation at a prosthetic clinic, interviews with key researchers and clinicians, and an analysis of historical and contemporary psychological and medical literature, she examines the modernization of amputation and exposes how medical understanding about phantom limbs has changed from the late-19th to the early-21st century. Crawford interrogates the impact of advances in technology, medicine, psychology and neuroscience, as well as changes in the meaning of limb loss, popular representations of amputees, and corporeal ideology. Phantom Limb questions our most deeply held ideas of what is normal, natural, and even moral about the physical human body.
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Design Beyond Vision

Author: Ellen Lupton,Andrea Lipps

Publisher: Chronicle Books

ISBN: 1616897740

Category: Design

Page: 224

View: 3302

A powerful reminder to anyone who thinks design is primarily a visual pursuit, The Senses accompanies a major exhibition at the Cooper-Hewitt Smithsonian Design Museum that explores how space, materials, sound, and light affect the mind and body. Learn how contemporary designers, including Petra Blaisse, Bruce Mau, Malin+Goetz and many others, engage sensory experience. Multisensory design can solve problems and enhance life for everyone, including those with sensory disabilities. Featuring thematic essays on topics ranging from design for the table to tactile graphics, tactile sound, and visualizing the senses, this book is a call to action for multisensory design practice. The Senses: Design Beyond Vision is mandatory reading for students and professionals working in diverse fields, including products, interiors, graphics, interaction, sound, animation, and data visualization, or anyone seeking the widest possible understanding of design. The book, designed by David Genco with Ellen Lupton, is edited by Lupton and curator Andrea Lipps. Includes essays by Lupton, Lipps, Christopher Brosius, Hansel Bauman, Karen Kraskow, Binglei Yan, and Simon Kinnear.
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An Interdisciplinary and International Approach

Author: Alan Roulstone

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 1137450428

Category: Social Science

Page: 249

View: 1233

This book brings together formally disparate literatures and debates on disability and technology in a way that captures the complex interplay between the two. Drawing on disability studies, technology studies and clinical studies, the book argues that interdisciplinary insights together provide a more nuanced and less stylized picture of the benefits and barriers in disability and technology. Drawing on a breadth of empirical studies from across the globe, a picture emerges of the complex and multi-directional interplay of technology and disability. Technology is neither inherently enabling or disabling but fundamentally shaped by the social dynamics that shape their design, use and impact.
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Parents, Privilege, and Special Education

Author: Colin Ong-Dean

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN: 9780226630021

Category: Social Science

Page: 216

View: 9717

Students in special education programs can have widely divergent experiences. For some, special education amounts to a dumping ground where schools unload their problem students, while for others, it provides access to services and accommodations that drastically improve chances of succeeding in school and beyond. Distinguishing Disability argues that this inequity in treatment is directly linked to the disparity in resources possessed by the students’ parents. Since the mid-1970s, federal law has empowered parents of public school children to intervene in virtually every aspect of the decision making involved in special education. However, Colin Ong-Dean reveals that this power is generally available only to those parents with the money, educational background, and confidence needed to make effective claims about their children’s disabilities and related needs. Ong-Dean documents this class divide by examining a wealth of evidence, including historic rates of learning disability diagnosis, court decisions, and advice literature for parents of disabled children. In an era of expanding special education enrollment, Distinguishing Disability is a timely analysis of the way this expansion has created new kinds of inequality.
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Designing Accessible User Experiences

Author: Sarah Horton,Whitney Quesenbery

Publisher: Rosenfeld Media

ISBN: 193382039X

Category: Computers

Page: 288

View: 7534

If you are in charge of the user experience, development, or strategy for a web site, A Web for Everyone will help you make your site accessible without sacrificing design or innovation. Rooted in universal design principles, this book provides solutions: practical advice and examples of how to create sites that everyone can use.
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Understanding Humour and Genre in Cinematic Constructions of Impairment and Disability

Author: Alison Wilde

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1317135245

Category: Social Science

Page: 196

View: 973

Comedy and humour have frequently played a key role in disabled people’s lives, for better or for worse. Comedy has also played a crucial part in constructing cultural representations of disability and impairments, contributing to the formation and maintenance of cultural attitudes towards disabled people, and potentially shaping disabled people’s images of themselves. As a complex and often polysemic form of communication, there is a need for greater understanding of the way we make meanings from comedy. This is the first book which explores the specific role of comedic film genres in representations of disability and impairment. Wilde argues that there is a need to explore different ways to synthesise Critical/Disability Studies with Film Studies approaches, and that a better understanding of genre conventions is necessary if we are to understand the conditions of possibility for new representational forms and challenges to ableism. After a discussion of the possibilities of a ‘fusion’ between Disability Studies and Film Studies, and a consideration of the relationships of comedy to disability, Wilde undertakes analysis of contemporary films from the romantic comedy, satire, and gross-out genres. Analysis is focused upon the place of disabled and non-disabled people in particular films, considering visual, audio, and narrative dimensions of representation and the ways they might shape the expectations of film audiences. This book is of particular value to those in Film and Media Studies, and Critical/Disability Studies, especially for those who are investigating more inclusive practices in cultural representation.
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Author: Chris van Uffelen

Publisher: Braun Publish,Csi

ISBN: 9783037682203

Category: Architecture

Page: 304

View: 8396

"Buildings and rooms bearing traces of the past that are integrated into new concepts are arousing enthusiasm both within and beyond the design scene. This volume explores the functional and artistic possibilities emerging from revitalization that respects the inherited, often shabby and dilapidated building structures and its fabric. Whether through striking contrast with the new creation or reinterpretation of the existing architecture – or indeed both together – all featured projects are defined by their respectful and thoughtful stance towards the sites they occupy and establish an enthralling relationship between the old and the new."--Page 4 de la couverture.
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