Author: Jack P. Friedman

Publisher: Barron's snippet

ISBN: 9780764135347

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 745

View: 6473

Expanded with new entries and updated to reflect recent economic developments and the current business climate, this quick-reference dictionary defines more than 7,500 terms relating to accounting, taxation, advertising, business law, communications, transportation, computers and the Internet, economics, finance, insurance, international business, management, marketing, real estate, and statistics. Definitions come with examples, illustrations, and cross-references. An appendix defines hundreds of business-related abbreviations and acronyms. Here is a useful, easy-to-understand reference book with information that is helpful to everyone involved in business activities, whether novices or experienced business executives.
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Author: John Downes,Jordan Elliot Goodman

Publisher: Barron's Educational Series

ISBN: 9780764143045

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 865

View: 5296

Presents more than 5,000 terms and descriptions related to stocks, bonds, mutual funds, banking, tax laws and more, in an updated edition that includes diagrams and charts and takes into account new financial regulations and recent dramatic swings in equities, credit and other financial resources. Original.
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Author: Jonathan Law,John Smullen

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0199229740

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 471

View: 5077

This dictionary covers all aspects of finance and banking, from personal investments to international trading.
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Over 9,000 terms clearly defined

Author: Bloomsbury Publishing

Publisher: A&C Black

ISBN: 1408102277

Category: Foreign Language Study

Page: 400

View: 3450

This dictionary provides comprehensive coverage of the terms used in banking and finance, ranging from personal bank accounts to international money markets. It is aimed at professionals working in or involved with banking and finance, and for students, whether studying A-Levels, degree or professional qualifications in banking and finance. Fully revised and updated this dictionary contains over 9000 entries providing clear, up-to-date coverage of all aspects of banking and finance. The book also includes encyclopedic comments on banking and financial practice, expanding on complex terms such as "poison pills" and "bills of exchange", and special supplements on money, currencies, international banks and stock exchanges.
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Author: Jae K. Shim,Joel G. Siegel

Publisher: Barron's snippet

ISBN: 9780764143106

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 523

View: 9689

The updated edition of this quick-reference short-entry dictionary defines more than 2,500 accounting, auditing, compliance, and tax-related terms. General areas covered include financial accounting and reporting, managerial and cost management, auditing and financial statement analysis, compliance, and information technology (IT) terms. Also included are many terms from related business disciplines that the accountant must know, such as finance, personal finance, investments, Internet, economics, quantitative tools, and international finance.
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Terminology Plain and Simple Explained

Author: Thomas Herold

Publisher: Thomas Herold

ISBN: 1501030132

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 272

View: 7461

Financial Terms Plain and Simple Explained This practical financial glossary helps you understand and comprehend common financial terms. It was written with an emphasis to quickly grasp the context without using jargon. It is based on common usage as practiced by financial professionals. Compiled over the last 3 years from questions and feedback to financial articles published by the Wealth Building Course education program. This book is useful if you are new to business and finance. It also includes most financial terms for investors and entrepreneurs. It also covers the lingo that was introduced in the financial crisis of 2008 until now. The following is an example term taken from the book to give you an idea about the writing style. Debasing the Currency Debasing the currency refers to the all too common historical process of lowering a currency’s actual value. In the past, this phrase commonly came to be associated with commodity money made principally from either silver or gold. Should the sum total of silver, gold, nickel, or copper be reduced, then the physical money is called debased. Even venerable institutions like the Roman Empire, with a thousand year history of growth and stability, have stooped to such debasing of the currency. Reasons that a government chooses to debase the currency in this way center around the financial benefits that the government is able to reap. These are done at the citizenry’s expense though. Governments that lowered the quantity of gold and silver in their coinage found that they could quietly mint more coins from a given fixed quantity of metal on hand. The downside to this for the general population centers on the inflation that this in turn causes. Such inflation is yet another benefit for the currency debasing government that then finds that it can pay off government debt or repudiate government bonds easier. The populace’s purchasing power is significantly reduced as a result of this, along with their then lowered standard of living. Debasing a currency lowers the value of the currency in question. Given enough time and abuse by the governing authorities, this debasing can even lead to a collapse in the existing currency that causes a newer currency or coinage to be created and launched for the nation or state. In present day times, debasing the currency is accomplished in more subtle means. Since currencies these days are made of only paper, involving no metal, debasing the currency simply involves printing additional paper dollars. With the advent of electronic banking, even this printing press operation is no longer required. The government simply creates money on a computer screen, literally conjuring it out of thin air. They are able to accomplish this in one of two ways. One way that they do this is via the Federal Reserve, which buys treasury securities by simply crediting the receivers’ bank accounts with electronically created money. The Federal Reserve then has tangible assets in Treasury bills that is it able to trade or sell when it wishes. Another way that this creation of money that debases the currency is able to be performed is through the Fractional Reserve Banking System. Since the Federal Reserve only requires banks to keep a ten percent reserve ratio of deposits on hand, these banks when they are credited funds from the Federal Reserve are able to loan this new money out in multiples that are equivalent to the leverage created by this ten percent only reserve ratio. In both of these ways, the Federal Reserve is able to create more money quietly and at will. This is how modern day debasing of the currency is effectively accomplished.
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Author: Wesley Crowder,Thomas Herold

Publisher: Independently Published

ISBN: 9781521730102

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 280

View: 8126

Understand Banking Terms - Make Better Financial Decisions This practical financial dictionary for banking terms helps you understand and comprehend most common banking lingo. It was written with an emphasis to quickly grasp the context without using jargon. Each of the 200 financial banking terms is explained in detail and also gives practical examples. It is based on common usage as practiced by financial professionals. Compiled over the last 3 years from questions and feedback to financial articles published by the Wealth Building Course education program. The Essential Investment Banking Dictionary This book is useful if you are new to business and finance. It includes most popular banking terms for businesses, investors and entrepreneurs. It also covers the lingo that was introduced in the financial crisis of 2008 until 2017. With the alphabetical order it makes it quick and easy to find what you are looking for. Financial Dictionary Series Additional financial dictionaries are available in this series. Please also check out: Accounting, Retirement, Corporate Finance, Economics, Investments, Laws & Regulations, Acronyms, Real Estate & Trading. Click on the author name to see them. Example: What is a Custodian Bank? A custodian bank is a special financial institution that carries the responsibility for protecting the financial assets of individuals or companies. These institutions can also be called simply custodians. Such outfits serve as a third party check that protects the assets they are guarding against the fund managers and any illegal activities they may pursue. Congress established these custodian banks with the Investment Company Act of 1940 in order to protect investors. Thanks to this particular legislation, investment companies must adhere to specific stringent listing requirements and must be registered with the Securities and Exchange Commission. The custodian bank performs a number of activities in their primary function of watching over the financial assets of businesses and individuals. They settle sales and purchases of bonds and equities and physically protect the certificates of these assets. These institutions also gather information about and income from such assets. When the assets are stocks this means dividends. When the instruments are bonds, they collect the interest from the coupons. The custodians also disperse information they gather, pertaining to yearly general meetings and shareholder voting. They handle any foreign exchange transfers as necessary and manage all cash transactions. Finally, custodians deliver routine reports on their various activities to the customers. Custodians banks provide reports on every trade or deal which they transact on behalf of the clients. They must be consistently delivered. Along with these reports they furnish information on the companies whose assets they hold besides information on general meetings. When a custodian is holding foreign shares or bonds, they will also have to change currencies as necessary. This is the case when the fund manager buys or sells foreign currency assets. It is also necessary when companies pay out dividends or bonds receive interest with these overseas financial instruments. Custodian banks are a critical component of the modern investment environment. Without them to carry out these functions, all of the important financial record keeping and housekeeping items would be neglected. Not all custodian banks are national operations in the United States. A number of the major international financial institutions offer these services around the globe. Note: This example description is shorted due to publish restrictions. Each term is explained with 600 words and more.
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Author: Douglas Downing,Michael Covington,Melody Covington

Publisher: Barrons Educational Series

ISBN: 9781438008783

Category: Computers

Page: 584

View: 7912

This updated edition includes the most recent terms relating to constantly expanding computer and internet technology. More than 3,200 terms and definitions deal with: Practical guidance for business software users Computer security, law, and ethics Computer programming, with examples in several computer languages Internet culture and latest developments Previous editions of this user-friendly book have proved especially helpful to readers who feel intimidated by computer technicians' jargon. The authors clarify technical terminology while keeping to the highest standards of accuracy. One grateful reader called this book the "Rosetta Stone" for deciphering computer terms. Features many line illustrations and tables.
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Author: D. Larry Crumbley,Jack P. Friedman

Publisher: Barrons Educational Series Incorporated

ISBN: N.A

Category: Reference

Page: 358

View: 8379

Provides concise definitions, but is not intended as a current authority. Includes terms connected with income, excise, sales, and property tax, as well as Social Security. Annotation copyright Book News, Inc. Portland, Or.
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Author: Moorad Choudhry

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN: 0470827025

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 350

View: 4565

The ultimate guide for bank management: how to survive and thrive throughout the business cycle An essential guide for bankers and students of finance everywhere, The Principles of Banking reiterates that the primary requirement of banking—sound capital and liquidity risk management—had been forgotten in the years prior to the financial crash. Serving as a policy guide for market practitioners and regulators at all levels, the book explains the keys to success that bankers need to follow during good times in order to be prepared for the bad, providing in-depth guidance and technical analysis of exactly what constitutes good banking practice. Accessible to professionals and students alike, The Principles of Banking covers issues of practical importance to bank practitioners, including asset-liability management, liquidity risk, internal transfer pricing, capital management, stress testing, and more. With an emphasis on viewing business cycles as patterns of stable and stressful market behavior, and rich with worked examples illustrating the key principles of bank asset-liability management, the book is an essential policy guide for today and tomorrow. It also offers readers access to an accompanying website holding policy templates and teaching aids. Illustrates how unsound banking practices that were evident in previous bank crashes were repeated during the creation of the 2007-2008 financial market crisis Provides a template that can be used to create a sound liquidity and asset-liability management framework at any bank An essential resource for the international banking community as it seeks to re-establish its credibility, as well as for students of finance Explains the original principles of banking, including sound lending policy and liquidity management, and why these need to be restated in order to avoid another bank crisis at the time of the next economic recession Covers topics of particular importance to students and academia, many of which are marginally—if ever—addressed in current text books on finance Offers readers access to a companion website featuring invaluable learning and teaching aids Written by a banking practitioner with extensive professional and teaching experience in the field, The Principles of Banking explains exactly how to get back to basics in risk management in the banking community, essential if we are to maintain a sustainable banking industry. “engaging and interesting and, more importantly, easily understood, allowing a clear picture to emerge of how the principle or concept under discussion is to be applied in the real world.” - Graeme Wolvaardt, Head of Market & Liquidity Risk Control, Europe Arab Bank Plc
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Author: Kathleen Fitzpatrick,Wallace W. Kravitz

Publisher: Barron's Educational Series

ISBN: 9780764141331

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 330

View: 8020

Known for many years as BarronÂ's Easy Way Series, the new editions of these popular self-teaching titles are now BarronÂ's E-Z Series. Brand-new cover designs reflect all new page layouts, which feature extensive two-color treatment, a fresh, modern typeface, and more graphic material than ever— charts, graphs, diagrams, instructive line illustrations, and where appropriate, amusing cartoons. Meanwhile, the quality of the booksÂ' contents remains at least as high as ever. BarronÂ's E-Z books are self-help manuals focused to improve studentsÂ' grades in a wide variety of academic and practical subjects. For most subjects, the level of difficulty ranges between high school and college-101 standards. Although primarily designed as self-teaching manuals, these books are also preferred by many teachers as classroom supplements—and for some courses, as main textbooks. E-Z books review their subjects in detail, and feature both short quizzes and longer tests with answers to help students gauge their learning progress. Subject heads and key phrases are set in a second color as an easy reference aid. BarronÂ's E-Z Bookkeeping presents a simplified approach to bookkeeping as it demonstrates use of financial statements, the ledger, the two-column general journal, and various other journals.
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Author: John Downes,Jordan Elliot Goodman

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9780764150999

Category: Finance

Page: 1396

View: 1205

Provides lists of brokers and defines important investment terms.
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Author: Deborah K. Dilley

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN: 1118428714

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 274

View: 3623

The essential guide for finance professionals in all industries for quick answers to banking questions, Essentials of Banking provides a nuts and bolts presentation explaining the regulatory, business, and people facts of the business of banking in a handy, concise format. It is the only guide you will need containing all the relevant facts of banking, all in one place.
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A Simplified Guide to the Language of Law

Author: Steven H. Gifis

Publisher: Barrons Educational Series Incorporated

ISBN: 9780764139215

Category: Law

Page: 575

View: 2478

Now updated, this popular quick reference source presents more than 2,000 legal terms defined and explained clearly and concisely in plain English. This volume cuts through the legalese jargon, allowing readers to understand documents important to them.
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Author: Jonathan Law

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0199684987

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 672

View: 8463

This wide-ranging and authoritative dictionary contains over 7,100 entries covering all areas of business and management, including marketing, organizational behaviour, business strategy, law, and taxation. In its sixth edition, it features the very latest developments, such as those relating to information technology (including mobile technology), and the financial crisis and the subsequent sovereign debt crisis. Entries have been updated to refer to recent events and news in the field, for example the LIBOR scandal. Over 100 new entries have been added including bitcoin, Cog's Ladder, mobile commerce, Six Sigma, social media, theory of institutional deficiencies, and zero-hours contract. Furthermore, there is expanded coverage of areas such as financial regulation and corporate social responsibility, with a number of new entries offering insight into these topics, including aw-shucks defence and Financial Conduct Authority. The new edition of this established bestselling dictionary elucidates modern financial and management jargon, defining entries in a clear, concise, and accessible manner. With recommended web links for many entries, accessible and kept up to date via the Dictionary of Business and Management companion website, this edition is more informative than ever. This A--Z reference work is essential for business students, teachers and professionals, and useful for anyone needing a guide to business terminology.
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Author: Shelagh Heffernan

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN: 0470020040

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 736

View: 5083

Modern Banking focuses on the theory and practice of banking, and its prospects in the new millennium. The book is written for courses in banking and finance at Masters/MBA level, or undergraduate degrees specialising in this area. Bank practitioners wishing to deepen and broaden their understanding of banking issues may also be attracted to this book. While they often have exceptional and detailed knowledge of the areas they have worked in, busy bankers may be all too unaware of the key broader issues. Consider the fundamental questions: What is unique about a bank? and What differentiates it from other financial institutions? Answering these questions begins to show how banks should evolve and adapt - or fail. If bankers know the underlying reasons for why profitable banks exist, it will help them to devise strategies for sustained growth. Modern Banking concludes with a set of case studies that give practical insight into the key issues covered in the book: The core banking functions Different types of banks and diversification of bank activities Risk management: issues and techniques Global regulation: Basel 1 and Basel 2. Bank regulation in the UK, US, EU, and Japan Banking in emerging markets Bank failure and financial crises Competitive issues, from cost efficiency to mergers and acquisitions Case Studies including: Goldman Sachs, Bankers Trust/Deutsche Bank, Sumitomo Mitsui, Bancomer
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Author: Maureen Burton,Reynold F. Nesiba,Bruce Brown

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1317476743

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 700

View: 5590

Completely revised and updated to include the ongoing financial crisis and the Obama administration's programs to combat it, this is the best available introductory textbook for an undergraduate course on Financial Markets and Institutions. It provides balanced coverage of theories, policies, and institutions in a conversational style that avoids complex models and mathematics, making it a student-friendly text with many unique teaching features. Financial crises, global competition, deregulation, technological innovation, and growing government oversight have significantly changed financial markets and institutions. The new edition of this text is designed to capture the ongoing changes, and to present an analytical framework that enables students to understand and anticipate changes in the financial system and accompanying changes in markets and institutions. The text includes Learning Objectives and end-of-chapter Key Words and Questions, and an online Instructor's Manual is available to adopters.
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Cross-selling the Bank's Products & Services to Meet Your Customer's Every Financial Need

Author: Dwight S. Ritter

Publisher: Probus Professional Pub

ISBN: N.A

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 250

View: 1256

Banking's greatest opportunities are often overlooked and underdeveloped. In fact, a veritable gold mine is already in your bank - the customer! Have you made the most of your customers' potential? You have a full line of quality financial products and services to offer, but chances are even your best customers do business with the competition. This isn't necessarily because of pricing or product or trustworthiness. It's often due to a simple lack of effort. We all know that it is easier and more cost-effective to retain and cultivate an existing customer than it is to attract new ones. Yet, many customers are never exposed to the full range of products and services available to them. In most cases, all you have to do is ask! Relationship Banking is the key to realizing the potential of your bank's existing resources: your staff, your customers and your product line. By cross-selling products to your customers, you gain an advantage in market share, retention rates, fee income and, ultimately, profitability. Author Dwight Ritter offers workable solutions which can be put to immediate use. Inside Relationship Banking, you will find the components of a successful program, including: . Financial products and services: By identifying how your product line relates to customer needs, its appeal can skyrocket. This comprehensive analysis includes everything from savings accounts to mutual funds. Lead Product Selling: By identifying those products which customers automatically expect and linking them to related products, you create natural opportunities for effective and productive cross-selling. Lead Product Selling helps bankers meet the needs and raise the awareness of their customers.Improving communications: Good communications are essential to build, nurture and expand any customer relationship. By asking the right questions, opportunities quickly become apparent. By learning how to listen, needs can be fulfilled and relationships can be cemented. Measuring performance and productivity: Without proper tracking, no program can be at its most effective. Relationship Banking includes a tested plan for tracking the results of cross-selling efforts.
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