Journalism in American Modernist Prose

Author: David T. Humphries

Publisher: Taylor & Francis

ISBN: 0415976758

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 247

View: 2900

First published in 2006. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.
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Author: Gurpreet Kaur

Publisher: Partridge Publishing

ISBN: 1482850850

Category: Literary Collections

Page: 258

View: 4168

This referential collection of essays is an important guide to the emergence and development of literary journalism through the centuries. The book begins with the defining of genres, literature and journalism, which blur the lines between them. It also gives an insight into the theories of narratology. Some practitioners included in this book are great American writers like, John Hersey, Truman Capote, Norman Mailer and Don DeLillo. These literary journalists bring to life both major as well trivial issues of the society. New journalists coalesce all the fictional techniques with the journalistic methods to present a unique and sophisticated style which requires extensive research and even more careful reporting than done in the typical news articles. The book closes with the concluding thoughts followed by list of works cited.
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the novels of Willa Cather

Author: Sally Peltier Harvey

Publisher: Fairleigh Dickinson Univ Pr

ISBN: N.A

Category: Fiction

Page: 190

View: 8514

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The Myth of Wilderness in Modern American Literature

Author: Patricia Ross

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1135505039

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 144

View: 583

First published in 2006. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.
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The Emergence of a Modern Narrative Form

Author: John C. Hartsock

Publisher: Univ of Massachusetts Press

ISBN: 9781558492523

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 294

View: 6852

During the 1960s, such works as Truman Capote's In Cold Blood and Joan Didion's Slouching Towards Bethlehem were cited as examples of the "new journalism." True stories that read like novels, they combined the journalist's task of factual reporting with the art of fictional narration. Yet as John C. Hartsock shows in this revealing study, the roots of this distinctive form of writing--whether called new journalism, literary journalism, or creative nonfiction--can be traced at least as far back as the late nineteenth century. In the decades following the American Civil War, Stephen Crane, Lafcadio Hearn, and other journalists challenged the notion, then just emerging, that the reporter's job was to offer a concise statement of the "objective truth." Drawing on the techniques of the realistic novel, these writers developed a new narrative style of reporting aimed at lessening the distance between observer and observed, subject and object. By the 1890s, Hartsock argues, literary journalism had achieved critical recognition as a new form of writing, different not only from "objective" reporting but also from the sensationalistic "yellow press" and at times the socially engaged "muckrakers." In the twentieth century, the form has continued to evolve and maintain its vitality, despite being marginalized by the academic establishment. A former journalist who covered Capitol Hill for UPI and reported on the collapse of the Soviet Union for the San Francisco Examiner, Hartsock brings a fresh and informed perspective to the issues he examines. The result is a concise introduction to the genesis and development of a significant literary genre.
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Author: Michael Herr

Publisher: Vintage

ISBN: 0307814165

Category: History

Page: 272

View: 5536

"The best book to have been written about the Vietnam War" (The New York Times Book Review); an instant classic straight from the front lines. From its terrifying opening pages to its final eloquent words, Dispatches makes us see, in unforgettable and unflinching detail, the chaos and fervor of the war and the surreal insanity of life in that singular combat zone. Michael Herr’s unsparing, unorthodox retellings of the day-to-day events in Vietnam take on the force of poetry, rendering clarity from one of the most incomprehensible and nightmarish events of our time. Dispatches is among the most blistering and compassionate accounts of war in our literature.
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The Early United States Through the Lens of Travel

Author: Jeffrey Hotz

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9780415977081

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 318

View: 9433

First published in 2006. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.
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The Ethics of Language in American Realism

Author: Jennifer Carol Cook

Publisher: Taylor & Francis

ISBN: 9780415978354

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 161

View: 5872

American literary realism burgeoned during a period of tremendous technological innovation. Because the realists evinced not only a fascination with this new technology but also an ethos that seems to align itself with science, many have paired the two fields rather unproblematically. But this book demonstrates that many realist writers, from Mark Twain to Stephen Crane, Charles W. Chesnutt to Edith Wharton, felt a great deal of anxiety about the advent of new technologies – precisely at the crucial intersection of ethics and language. For these writers, the communication revolution was a troubling phenomenon, not only because of the ways in which the new machines had changed and increased the circulation of language but, more pointedly, because of the ways in which language itself had effectively become a machine: a vehicle perpetuating some of society's most pernicious clichés and stereotypes – particularly stereotypes of race – in unthinking iteration. This work takes a close look at how the realists tried to forge an ethical position between the two poles of science and sentimentality, attempting to create an alternative mode of speech that, avoiding the trap of codifying iteration, could enable ethical action.
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Author: M.H. Abrams,Geoffrey Harpham

Publisher: Cengage Learning

ISBN: 1285974514

Category: Education

Page: 448

View: 2119

First published over fifty years ago, A GLOSSARY OF LITERARY TERMS remains an essential text for all serious students of literature. Now fully updated to reflect the latest scholarship on recent and rapidly evolving critical theories, the eleventh edition contains a complete glossary of essential literary terms presented as a series of engaging, beautifully crafted essays that explore the terms, place them in context, and suggest related entries and additional reading. This indispensable, authoritative, and highly affordable reference covers terms useful in discussing literature and literary history, theory, and criticism. Perfect as a core text for introductory literary theory or as a supplement to any literature course, this classic work is an invaluable reference that students can continue to use throughout their academic and professional careers. Important Notice: Media content referenced within the product description or the product text may not be available in the ebook version.
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Author: William Faulkner

Publisher: Vintage

ISBN: 0679641432

Category: Fiction

Page: 320

View: 8081

“Read, read, read. Read everything—trash, classics, good and bad, and see how they do it. Just like a carpenter who works as an apprentice and studies the master. Read! You’ll absorb it. Then write. If it is good, you’ll find out. If it’s not, throw it out the window.” —William Faulkner Absalom, Absalom! is Faulkner’s epic tale of Thomas Sutpen, an enigmatic stranger who comes to Jefferson, Mississippi, in the early 1830s to wrest his mansion out of the muddy bottoms of the north Mississippi wilderness. He was a man, Faulkner said, “who wanted sons and the sons destroyed him.” From the Trade Paperback edition.
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Author: Френсис Фицджеральд

Publisher: Litres

ISBN: 5457911748

Category: Foreign Language Study

Page: N.A

View: 3040

Фрэнсис Скотт Фицджеральд (1896–1940) – американский писатель и сценарист, классик американской литературы.Предлагаемый читателям психологический роман «Великий Гэтсби» (1925) нравственно развенчивает безоглядное восприятие «американской мечты» – идеи социального преуспеяния личности.Неадаптированный текст на языке оригинала снабжен постраничным комментарием и словарем.
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Author: Michael Robertson

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN: 9780231109697

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 253

View: 3028

Born in 1871, Stephen Crane came of age when mass-circulation newspapers began to attract readers with stories that resembled realist fiction--such as Crane's RED BADGE OF COURAGE in 1895. Ernest Hemingway and Theodore Dreiser were two writers greatly influenced by Crane's work. This lucid cultural history goes beyond biography to trace a literary revolution that changed the nature of newspaper reporting forever. 6 illustrations.
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The Johns Hopkins Guide

Author: Michael Groden,Martin Kreiswirth,Imre Szeman

Publisher: JHU Press

ISBN: 142140639X

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 536

View: 1918

Contemporary Literary and Cultural Theory: The Johns Hopkins Guide is a clear, accessible, and detailed overview of the most important thinkers and topics in the field. Written by specialists from across disciplines, its entries cover contemporary theory from Adorno to ?i?ek, providing an informative and reliable introduction to a vast, challenging area of inquiry. Materials include newly commissioned articles along with essays drawn from The Johns Hopkins Guide to Literary Theory and Criticism, known as the definitive resource for students and scholars of literary theory and for philosophical reflection on literature and culture.
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A Literary Chronicle of the Forties

Author: Edmund Wilson

Publisher: Macmillan

ISBN: 9780374526672

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 534

View: 4608

Archibald MacLeish and the word -- Van Wyck Brooks's second phase -- The boys in the back room: James M. Cain ; n O'Hara ; William Saroyan ; Hans Otto Storm ; John Steinbeck ; Facing the Pacific -- Max Eastman in 1941 -- T.K. Whipple -- The antrobuses and the earwickers -- Alexander Woollcott of the phalanx -- The poetry of Angelica Balabanoff -- Mr. Joseph E. Davies as a stylist -- Thoughts on being bibliographed -- Through the embassy window: Harold Nicolson -- Kay Boyle and the Saturday Evening Post -- The life and times of John Barrymore -- Never apologize, never explain": the art of Evelyn Waugh -- John Mulholland and the art of illusion -- What became of Louis Bromfield -- J. Dover Wilson on Falstaff -- A toast and a tear for Dorothy Parker -- A treatise on tales of horror -- A guide to Finnegans wake -- A novel by Salvador Dali -- A long talk about Jane Austen -- "You can't do this to me!" shrilled Celia -- Aldous Huxley in the world beyond time -- Vladimir Nabokov on Gogol -- Katherine Anne Porter -- A picture to hang in the library: Brooks's Age of Irving -- Why do people read detective stories? -- Bernard Shaw on the training of a statesman -- Reexamining Dr. Johnson -- Leonid Leonov: the sophistication of a formula -- Who cares who killed Roger Ackroyd? -- "Mr. Holmes, they were the footprints of a gigantic hound!" -- Glenway Wescott's war work -- A cry from the unquiet grave -- Tales of the marvellous and the ridiculous -- Thackeray's letters: a Victorian document -- Splendors and miseries of Evelyn Waugh -- George Saintsbury's centenary -- Ambushing a best-seller -- The apotheosis of Somerset Maugham -- William Saroyan and his darling old Providence -- Oscar Wilde: One must always seek what is most tragic -- George Grosz in the United States -- An old friend of the family: Thackery -- Gilbert without Sullivan -- George Saintsbury: gourmet and glutton -- Books of etiquette and Emily Post -- A dissenting opinion on Kafka -- Jean-Paul Sartre: the novelist and the existentialist -- The musical glasses of Peacock -- Edith Wharton: a memoir by an English friend -- The sanctity of Baudelaire -- Van Wyck Brooks on the Civil War period -- An analysis of Max Beerbohm -- The original of Tolstoy's Natasha -- The most unhappy man on Earth -- William Faulkner's reply to the civil-rights program -- In memory of Octave Mirbeau -- A reivival of Ronald Firbank -- Paul Rosenfedl: three phases.
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From Morse to McLuhan

Author: Daniel J. Czitrom

Publisher: Univ of North Carolina Press

ISBN: 9780807841075

Category: Social Science

Page: 254

View: 3609

In a fascinating and comprehensive intellectual history of modern communication in America, Daniel Czitrom examines the continuing contradictions between the progressive possibilities that new communications technologies offer and their use as instruments
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And Other Essays

Author: James Wood

Publisher: Farrar, Straus and Giroux

ISBN: 0374709068

Category: Literary Collections

Page: 352

View: 9238

Following The Broken Estate, The Irresponsible Self, and How Fiction Works—books that established James Wood as the leading critic of his generation—The Fun Stuff confirms Wood's preeminence, not only as a discerning judge but also as an appreciator of the contemporary novel. In twenty-three passionate, sparkling dispatches—that range over such crucial writers as Thomas Hardy, Leon Tolstoy, Edmund Wilson, and Mikhail Lermontov—Wood offers a panoramic look at the modern novel. He effortlessly connects his encyclopedic, passionate understanding of the literary canon with an equally in-depth analysis of the most important authors writing today, including Cormac McCarthy, Lydia Davis, Aleksandar Hemon, and Michel Houellebecq. Included in The Fun Stuff are the title essay on Keith Moon and the lost joys of drumming—which was a finalist for last year's National Magazine Awards—as well as Wood's essay on George Orwell, which Christopher Hitchens selected for the Best American Essays 2010. The Fun Stuff is indispensable reading for anyone who cares about contemporary literature.
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Author: Hans Walter Gabler

Publisher: Open Book Publishers

ISBN: 1783743662

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 410

View: 3549

This collection of essays from world-renowned scholar Hans Walter Gabler contains writings from a decade and a half of retirement spent exploring textual criticism, genetic criticism, and literary criticism. In these sixteen stimulating contributions, he develops theories of textual criticism and editing that are inflected by our advance into the digital era; structurally analyses arts of composition in literature and music; and traces the cultural implications discernible in book design, and in the canonisation of works of literature and their authors. Distinctive and ambitious, these essays move beyond the concerns of the community of critics and scholars. Gabler responds innovatively to the issues involved and often endeavours to re-think their urgencies by bringing together the orthodox tenets of different schools of textual criticism. He moves between a variety of topics, ranging from fresh genetic approaches to the work of James Joyce and Virginia Woolf, to significant contributions to the theorisation of scholarly editing in the digital age. Written in Gabler’s fluent style, these rich and elegant compositions are essential reading for literary and textual critics, scholarly editors, readers of James Joyce, New Modernism specialists, and all those interested in textual scholarship and digital editing under the umbrella of Digital Humanities.
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Author: Vincent Sherry

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1107079322

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 346

View: 8045

This volume explores the idea of decadence through readings of major modernist writers such as Ezra Pound and T. S. Eliot.
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