Its Role in the Court's History and the Nation's Constitutional Dialogue

Author: Melvin I. Urofsky

Publisher: Vintage

ISBN: 110187063X

Category: Law

Page: 544

View: 6825

From the admired judicial authority, author of Louis D. Brandeis (“Remarkable”—Anthony Lewis, The New York Review of Books; “Monumental”—Alan M. Dershowitz, The New York Times Book Review), Division and Discord, and Supreme Decisions—Melvin Urofsky’s major new book looks at the role of dissent in the Supreme Court and the meaning of the Constitution through the greatest and longest lasting public-policy debate in the country’s history, among members of the Supreme Court, between the Court and the other branches of government, and between the Court and the people of the United States. Urofsky writes of the necessity of constitutional dialogue as one of the ways in which we as a people reinvent and reinvigorate our democratic society. In Dissent and the Supreme Court, he explores the great dissents throughout the Court’s 225-year history. He discusses in detail the role the Supreme Court has played in helping to define what the Constitution means, how the Court’s majority opinions have not always been right, and how the dissenters, by positing alternative interpretations, have initiated a critical dialogue about what a particular decision should mean. This dialogue is sometimes resolved quickly; other times it may take decades before the Court adjusts its position. Louis Brandeis’s dissenting opinion about wiretapping became the position of the Court four decades after it was written. The Court took six decades to adopt the dissenting opinion of the first Justice John Harlan in Plessy v. Ferguson (1896)—that segregation on the basis of race violated the Constitution—in Brown v. Board of Education (1954). Urofsky shows that the practice of dissent grew slowly but steadily and that in the nineteenth century dissents became more frequent. In the (in)famous case of Dred Scott v. Sanford (1857), Chief Justice Roger Taney’s opinion upheld slavery, declaring that blacks could never be citizens. The justice received intense condemnations from several of his colleagues, but it took a civil war and three constitutional amendments before the dissenting view prevailed and Dred Scott was overturned. Urofsky looks as well at the many aspects of American constitutional life that were affected by the Earl Warren Court—free speech, race, judicial appointment, and rights of the accused—and shows how few of these decisions were unanimous, and how the dissents in the earlier cases molded the results of later decisions; how with Roe v. Wade—the Dred Scott of the modern era—dissent fashioned subsequent decisions, and how, in the Court, a dialogue that began with the dissents in Roe has shaped every decision since. Urofsky writes of the rise of conservatism and discusses how the resulting appointments of more conservative jurists to the bench put the last of the Warren liberals—William Brennan and Thurgood Marshall—in increasingly beleaguered positions, and in the minority. He discusses the present age of incivility, in which reasoned dialogue seems less and less possible. Yet within the Marble Palace, the members of the Supreme Court continue to hear arguments, vote, and draft majority opinions, while the minority continues to “respectfully dissent.” The Framers understood that if a constitution doesn’t grow and adapt, it atrophies and dies, and if it does, so does the democratic society it has supported. Dissent—on the Court and off, Urofsky argues—has been a crucial ingredient in keeping the Constitution alive and must continue to be so. (With black-and-white illustrations throughout.) From the Hardcover edition.
Read More

Great Opposing Opinions in Landmark Supreme Court Cases

Author: Mark V. Tushnet

Publisher: Beacon Press

ISBN: 9780807000366

Category: Law

Page: 229

View: 5859

A distinguished Supreme Court scholar introduces and explains sixteen influential cases from throughout the Court's history and offers a sense of what could have developed if the dissents were instead the majority opinions, looking at each case in terms of its political, social, economic, and cultural context. Original.
Read More

A Chronology

Author: Percival E. Jackson

Publisher: William S. Hein & Co., Inc.

ISBN: 9780806108391

Category: Dissenting opinions

Page: 583

View: 1481

A history of the legal thinking of the Supreme Court of the United States from the earliest period to the present, reflecting its members' strengths and weaknesses, restraints and excesses, philosophies and ideosyncrasies. Quotes extensively from the dissenting opinions of Supreme Court justices.
Read More

Author: Steven H. Shiffrin

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN: 9781400822966

Category: Law

Page: 220

View: 7603

Americans should not just tolerate dissent. They should encourage it. In this provocative and wide-ranging book, Steven Shiffrin makes this case by arguing that dissent should be promoted because it lies at the heart of a core American value: free speech. He contends, however, that the country's major institutions--including the Supreme Court and the mass media--wrongly limit dissent. And he reflects on how society and the law should change to encourage nonconformity. Shiffrin is one of the country's leading first-amendment theorists. He advances his dissent-based theory of free speech with careful reference to its implications for such controversial topics of constitutional debate as flag burning, cigarette advertising, racist speech, and subsidizing the arts. He shows that a dissent-based approach would offer strong protection for free speech--he defends flag burning as a legitimate form of protest, for example--but argues that it would still allow for certain limitations on activities such as hate speech and commercial speech. Shiffrin adds that a dissent-based approach reveals weaknesses in the approaches to free speech taken by postmodernism, Republicanism, deliberative democratic theory, outsider jurisprudence, and liberal theory. Throughout the book, Shiffrin emphasizes the social functions of dissent: its role in combating injustice and its place in cultural struggles over the meanings of America. He argues, for example, that if we took a dissent-based approach to free speech seriously, we would no longer accept the unjust fact that public debate is dominated by the voices of the powerful and the wealthy. To ensure that more voices are heard, he argues, the country should take such steps as making defamation laws more hospitable to criticism of powerful people, loosening the grip of commercial interests on the media, and ensuring that young people are taught the importance of challenging injustice. Powerfully and clearly argued, Shiffrin's book is a major contribution to debate about one of the most important subjects in American public life.
Read More

Author: Lee Epstein,William M Landes,Richard A Posner

Publisher: Harvard University Press

ISBN: 0674070682

Category: Law

Page: 440

View: 4814

Federal judges are not just robots or politicians in robes, yet their behavior is not well understood, even among themselves. Using statistical methods, a political scientist, an economist, and a judge construct a unified theory of judicial decision-making to dispel the mystery of how decisions from district courts to the Supreme Court are made.
Read More

Talking Back to the Rehnquist Court, Eight Cases That Subverted Civil Liberties and Civil Rights

Author: Michael Avery

Publisher: NYU Press

ISBN: 9780814707371

Category: Law

Page: 245

View: 2864

The lawyers and legal commentators who contribute to We Dissent unanimously agree that during Chief Justice William Rehnquist’s nineteen-year tenure, the Supreme Court failed to adequately protect civil liberties and civil rights. This is evident in majority opinions written for numerous cases heard by the Rehnquist Court, and eight of those cases are re-examined here, with contributors offering dissents to the Court’s decisions. The Supreme Court opinions criticized in We Dissent suggest that the Rehnquist Court placed the interests of government above the people, and as the dissents in this book demonstrate, the Court strayed far from our constitutional ideals when it abandoned its commitment to the protection of the individual rights of Americans. Each chapter focuses on a different case—ranging from torture to search and seizure, and from racial profiling to the freedom of political expression—with contributors summarizing the case and the decision, and then offering their own dissent to the majority opinion. For some cases featured in the book, the Court’s majority decisions were unanimous, so readers can see here for the first time what a dissent might have looked like. In other cases, contributors offer alternative dissents to the minority opinion, thereby widening the scope of opposition to key civil liberties decision made by the Rehnquist Court. Taken together, the dissents in this unique book address the pressing issue of Constitutional protection of individual freedom, and present a vision of constitutional law in the United States that differs considerably from the recent jurisprudence of the United States Supreme Court. Contributors: Michael Avery, Erwin Chemerinsky,Marjorie Cohn, Tracey Maclin, Eva Paterson, Jamin Raskin, David Rudovsky, Susan Kiyomi Serrano, and Abbe Smith.
Read More

Social Justice and the Fight for Public Space

Author: Don Mitchell

Publisher: Guilford Press

ISBN: 1462505872

Category: Science

Page: 270

View: 8789

Includes a 2014 Postscript addressing Occupy Wall Street and other developments. Efforts to secure the American city have life-or-death implications, yet demands for heightened surveillance and security throw into sharp relief timeless questions about the nature of public space, how it is to be used, and under what conditions. Blending historical and geographical analysis, this book examines the vital relationship between struggles over public space and movements for social justice in the United States. Don Mitchell explores how political dissent gains meaning and momentum--and is regulated and policed--in the real, physical spaces of the city. A series of linked cases provides in-depth analyses of early twentieth-century labor demonstrations, the Free Speech Movement and the history of People's Park in Berkeley, contemporary anti-abortion protests, and efforts to remove homeless people from urban streets.
Read More

Author: David L Hudson

Publisher: Visible Ink Press

ISBN: 157859264X

Category: Law

Page: 512

View: 2690

From the origins of the court to modern practical matters—including the federal judiciary system, the Supreme Court’s session schedule, and the argument, decision, and appeal process—this resource provides detailed answers on all aspects of the Supreme Court. Exploring the social, cultural, and political atmosphere in which judges are nominated and serve, this guide book answers questions such as When did the tradition of nine justices on the bench begin? When did the practice of hiring law clerks to assist with legal research and writing begin? and How do cases reach the Supreme Court? Details on historic decisions—including Marbury v. Madison, Brown v. Board of Education, Miranda v. Arizona, and Bush v. Gore—accompany a thorough history of all 17 Supreme Court Chief Justices.
Read More

Author: Ulrike Schultz,Gisela Shaw

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1135707405

Category: Law

Page: 152

View: 9539

Does gender matter in judging? And if so, in what way? Why were there so few women judges only two or three decades ago, and why are there so many now in most countries of the Western world? How do women judges experience their work in a previously male-dominated environment? What are their professional careers? How do they organise and live their lives? And, finally and most notably: do women judge differently from men (or even better)? These are the questions dealt with in this collection of contributions by seven authors from six countries (UK, Australia, USA, Canada, Syria and Argentina), contrasting views from common law and civil law countries. In spite of differences in the two legal systems, as well as greater gender diversity on the bench and the overall higher income and prestige enjoyed by judges in common law countries, women judges in all these countries – Syria included – share many problems. Diverse and intriguing facets are added to a debate that started thirty years ago but continues to leave ample space for further discussion. This book was originally published as a special issue of International Journal of the Legal Profession
Read More

Author: Frederic Reynold

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9780854901272

Category: Judicial process

Page: 214

View: 811

Frederic Reynold provides an engaging analysis of disagreement and dissent in judicial decision-making. He explores the root causes of disagreement in cases decided over the last 25 years or so in the House of Lords and the Supreme Court, and the light they throw on the character of judicial decision-making at this level. Disagreement and Dissent in Judicial Decision-making seeks to provide answers to a number of topical questions:• To what extent, if any, have judges observed the distinction between legal policy (a legitimate matter of concern to them) and public policy (which generally speaking is not)?• Can a non-lawyer be in a position to assess the merits of the competing views of the majority and the minority?• Can one talk in any meaningful sense of achieving “a balance” in the membership of the Supreme Court?• Is the UK Supreme Court, in terms of character and function, heading in the direction of the US Supreme Court?Split decisions of the law lords and (since October 2009) justices of the Supreme Court have always exercised a particular fascination, and especially those decisions featuring a bare majority. The analysis given here will throw light on a number of topical concerns, eg: the balance in the composition of, and the appointment of justices to, the Supreme Court; and the boundaries between judicial and political decision-making.
Read More

Political science, Public administration

Author: CTI Reviews

Publisher: Cram101 Textbook Reviews

ISBN: 1467206474

Category: Education

Page: 471

View: 838

Facts101 is your complete guide to Understanding American Politics and Government. In this book, you will learn topics such as The Constitution, Annotated Constitution, Federalism, and Civil Liberties plus much more. With key features such as key terms, people and places, Facts101 gives you all the information you need to prepare for your next exam. Our practice tests are specific to the textbook and we have designed tools to make the most of your limited study time.
Read More

Author: Tracey Maclin

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0199996431

Category: Law

Page: 416

View: 9445

The application of the Fourth Amendment's Exclusionary Rule has divided the Justices of the Supreme Court for nearly a century. As the legal remedy for when police violate the Fourth Amendment rights of a person and discover criminal evidence through illegal search and seizure, it is the most frequently litigated constitutional issue in United States courts. Tracey Maclin's The Supreme Court and the Fourth Amendment's Exclusionary Rule traces the rise and fall of the exclusionary rule using insight and behind-the-scenes access into the Court's thinking. Based on original archival research into the private papers of retired Justices, Professor Maclin's analysis clarifies the motivations and thoughts that explain the Court's exclusionary rule jurisprudence. He includes a comprehensive scholarly and objective discussion of the reasoning behind the Court decisions, and demonstrates that like other constitutional doctrines, the exclusionary rule is a political mechanism that expands and contracts as the times and Justices change. Ultimately, this book will help readers understand how constitutional law is constructed by judges with diverse political perspectives.
Read More

The Struggle to Shape the Federal Judiciary

Author: Sarah A. Binder,Forrest Maltzman

Publisher: Brookings Institution Press

ISBN: 9780815703914

Category: Political Science

Page: 198

View: 8911

For better or worse, federal judges in the United States today are asked to resolve some of the nation's most important and contentious public policy issues. Although some hold onto the notion that federal judges are simply neutral arbiters of complex legal questions, the justices who serve on the Supreme Court and the judges who sit on the lower federal bench are in fact crafters of public law. In recent years, for example, the Supreme Court has bolstered the rights of immigrants, endorsed the constitutionality of school vouchers, struck down Washington D.C.'s blanket ban on handgun ownership, and most famously, determined the outcome of the 2000 presidential election. The judiciary now is an active partner in the making of public policy. Judicial selection has been contentious at numerous junctures in American history, but seldom has it seemed more acrimonious and dysfunctional than in recent years. Fewer than half of recent appellate court nominees have been confirmed, and at times over the past few years, over ten percent of the federal bench has sat vacant. Many nominations linger in the Senate for months, even years. All the while, the judiciary's caseload grows. Advice and Dissent explores the state of the nation's federal judicial selection system—a process beset by deepening partisan polarization, obstructionism, and deterioration of the practice of advice and consent. Focusing on the selection of judges for the U.S. Courts of Appeals and the U.S. District Courts, the true workhorses of the federal bench, Sarah A. Binder and Forrest Maltzman reconstruct the history and contemporary practice of advice and consent. They identify the political and institutional causes of conflict over judicial selection over the past sixty years, as well as the consequences of such battles over court appointments. Advice and Dissent offers proposals for reforming the institutions of judicial selection, advocating pragmatic reforms that seek to harness the incentives of presidents and senators together. How well lawmakers confront the breakdown in advice and consent will have lasting consequences for the institutional capacity of the U.S. Senate and for the performance of the federal bench.
Read More

How Oliver Wendell Holmes Changed His Mind--and Changed the History of Free Speech in America

Author: Thomas Healy

Publisher: Metropolitan Books

ISBN: 1429949090

Category: History

Page: 336

View: 9060

A gripping intellectual history reveals how Oliver Wendell Holmes became a free-speech advocate and established the modern understanding of the First Amendment No right seems more fundamental to American public life than freedom of speech. Yet well into the twentieth century, that freedom was still an unfulfilled promise, with Americans regularly imprisoned merely for speaking out against government policies. Indeed, free speech as we know it comes less from the First Constitutional Amendment than from a most unexpected source: Supreme Court justice Oliver Wendell Holmes. A lifelong skeptic, he disdained all individual rights, including the right to express one's political views. But in 1919, it was Holmes who wrote a dissenting opinion that would become the canonical affirmation of free speech in the United States. Why did Holmes change his mind? That question has puzzled historians for almost a century. Now, with the aid of newly discovered letters and confidential memos, law professor Thomas Healy reconstructs in vivid detail Holmes's journey from free-speech opponent to First Amendment hero. It is the story of a remarkable behind-the-scenes campaign by a group of progressives to bring a legal icon around to their way of thinking—and a deeply touching human narrative of an old man saved from loneliness and despair by a few unlikely young friends. Beautifully written and exhaustively researched, The Great Dissent is intellectual history at its best, revealing how free debate can alter the life of a man and the legal landscape of an entire nation. A Kirkus Reviews Best Nonfiction Book of 2013
Read More

Author: Theodore Brown (Jr.)

Publisher: Univ. of Tennessee Press

ISBN: 9781572331785

Category: History

Page: 459

View: 3031

In this first comprehensive history of the Tennessee Supreme Court, seven leading scholars explore the role played by the Court in the social, economic, and political life of the state. Charting the evolution and organization of the Court (and its predecessor, the Superior Court of Law and Equity), the authors also assess the work of the Court within the larger context of the legal history of the South. Arranged chronologically, this volume covers the period from statehood in 1796 through the judicial election of 1998 and traces the range of contentious issues the Court has faced, including slavery, Reconstruction, economic rights, the regulation of business, and race and gender relations. The authors also outline the Court's relationship with the Supreme Court of the United States and chronicle the achievements of the Court in public and private law, state constitutional law, property law, criminal justice, and family law. The central themes that emerge include the nature of federalism, the search for judicial independence, and the practice of judicial review. As the authors demonstrate, the work of the Tennessee Supreme Court highlights the importance of state courts to the federal system and illuminates the interplay between regionalism and national norms in shaping a state's legal culture. Indeed, as mediator of conflicts between traditional southern values and national economic and social trends, the Court has generally, if sometimes belatedly, adopted national legal standards. Further, while the Court has tended to defer to the state's legislative decision-making process, it has on occasion assumed a more activist role in order to assert individual rights for Tennessee'scitizens. Sponsored by the Tennessee Supreme Court Historical Society, this book is written for anyone interested in Tennessee history in general or legal history in particular. Appendixes include a comprehensive table of cases and biographical information about all the Court's judges.
Read More

Culture, History, Politics

Author: Heike Raphael-Hernandez,Shannon Steen

Publisher: NYU Press

ISBN: 0814776906

Category: Social Science

Page: 342

View: 8422

With a Foreword by Vijay Prashad and an Afterword by Gary Okihiro How might we understand yellowface performances by African Americans in 1930s swing adaptations of Gilbert and Sullivan's The Mikado, Paul Robeson's support of Asian and Asian American struggles, or the absorption of hip hop by Asian American youth culture? AfroAsian Encounters is the first anthology to look at the mutual influence of and relationships between members of the African and Asian diasporas. While these two groups have often been thought of as occupying incommensurate, if not opposing, cultural and political positions, scholars from history, literature, media, and the visual arts here trace their interconnections and interactions, as well as the tensions between the two groups that sometimes arise. AfroAsian Encounters probes beyond popular culture to trace the historical lineage of these coalitions from the late nineteenth century to the present. A foreword by Vijay Prashad sets the volume in the context of the Bandung conference half a century ago, and an afterword by Gary Okihiro charts the contours of a “Black Pacific.” From the history of Japanese jazz composers to the current popularity of black/Asian “buddy films” like Rush Hour, AfroAsian Encounters is a groundbreaking intervention into studies of race and ethnicity and a crucial look at the shifting meaning of race in the twenty-first century.
Read More

Feminist Rhetoric and the Law

Author: Katie L. Gibson

Publisher: University of Alabama Press

ISBN: 0817319786

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 180

View: 9060

A rhetorical analysis of Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg's feminist jurisprudence.
Read More

Author: Sonia Sotomayor

Publisher: C.H.Beck

ISBN: 3406659489

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 349

View: 6325

Aufgewachsen in der Bronx, Puertoricanerin, die Kindheit prekär, der Vater Alkoholiker, die Mutter überfordert – Sonia Sotomayor war es nicht gerade in die Wiege gelegt, eines Tages Richterin am höchsten Gericht der Vereinigten Staaten von Amerika zu werden. Mit einem großen Herzen und viel Humor erzählt diese Ausnahmefrau von ihrem Weg, aber nicht um sich dabei auf die Schulter zu klopfen, sondern um anderen Menschen mit ihrer eigenen Geschichte Mut zu machen. Ein hinreißendes, ansteckendes Buch über das Trotzdem und über die – wirklich wichtigen – Dinge des Lebens. „’Nach der Lektüre werden mich die Leser nach menschlichen Kriterien beurteilen’, schreibt Sonia Sotomayor. Wir, die wir in diesem Fall die Jury sind, finden sie einfach unwiderstehlich.“ Washingtonian „Überwältigende und stark geschriebene Memoiren zum Thema Identität und Persönlichkeitsfindung ... Offenherzig, scharf beobachtet und vor allem tief empfunden.“ The New York Times „Eine Frau, die weiß, wo sie herkommt und die die Kraft hat, uns dorthin mitzunehmen.“ The New York Times Book Review
Read More