The Art of Government in the Roman World

Author: J. E. Lendon

Publisher: Clarendon Press

ISBN: 9780199247639

Category: Political Science

Page: 320

View: 7457

J. E. Lendon offers a new interpretation of how the Roman empire worked in the first four centuries AD. A despotism rooted in force and fear enjoyed widespread support among the ruling classes of the provinces on the basis of an aristocratic culture of honour shared by rulers and ruled. The competitive Roman and Greek aristocrats of the empire conceived of their relative standing in terms of public esteem or honour, and conceived of their cities - towards which they felt a warm patriotism- as entities locked in a parallel struggle for primacy in honour over rivals. Emperors and provincial governors exploited these rivalries to gain the indispensable co-operation of local magnates by granting honours to individuals and their cities. Since rulers strove for honour as well, their subjects manipulated them with honours in their turn. Honour - whose workings are also traced in the Roman army - served as a way of talking and thinking about Roman government: it was both a species ofpower, and a way - connived in by rulers and ruled - of concealing the terrible realities of imperial rule.
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The Art of Government in the Roman World

Author: J. E. Lendon

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780198150794

Category: Political Science

Page: 320

View: 7092

Jon Lendon offers a new interpretation of how the Roman empire worked in the first four centuries AD. A despotism rooted in force and fear enjoyed widespread support among the ruling classes of the provinces on the basis of an aristocratic culture of honour shared by rulers and ruled. The competitive Roman and Greek aristocrats of the empire conceived of their relative standing in terms of public esteem or honour, and conceived of their cities - towards which they felt a warm patriotism- as entities locked in a parallel struggle for primacy in honour over rivals. Emperors and provincial governors exploited these rivalries to gain the indispensable co-operation of local magnates by granting honours to individuals and their cities. Since rulers strove for honour as well, their subjects manipulated them with honours in their turn. Honour - whose workings are also traced in the Roman army - served as a way of talking and thinking about Roman government: it was both a species ofpower, and a way - connived in by rulers and ruled - of concealing the terrible realities of imperial rule.
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Author: Anthony Riches

Publisher: Hodder Paperbacks

ISBN: 9780340920329

Category: Fiction

Page: 406

View: 9001

"War on Hadrian's Wall... an epic story of courage and treachery in Roman Britain"--Cover.
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Author: Anthony Riches

Publisher: Hodder & Stoughton

ISBN: 1848948549

Category: Fiction

Page: 300

View: 2554

'A master of the genre' The Times Thrilling, authentic and action-packed, this novel introduces soldier hero Marcus Valerius: a centurion stationed on Hadrian's Wall in the second century during a revolt against the Roman Empire.Marcus Valerius Aquila has scarcely landed in Britannia when he has to run for his life - condemned to dishonorable death by power-crazed emperor Commodus. The plan is to take a new name, serve in an obscure regiment on Hadrian's Wall and lie low until he can hope for justice. Then a rebel army sweeps down from the wastes north of the Wall, and Marcus has to prove he's hard enough to lead a century in the front line of a brutal, violent war.
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Author: N.A

Publisher: BRILL

ISBN: 9004352171

Category: History

Page: 552

View: 9331

The politics of honour in the Greek cities of the Roman Empire studies the honorific habits in the later Greek city, and in particular the honorific inscriptions that were set up for citizens, magistrates and (foreign) benefactors.
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A Sourcebook

Author: Dr Barbara Levick,Barbara Levick

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1134572638

Category: History

Page: 312

View: 9360

This book reveals how an empire that stretched from Glasgow to Aswan in Egypt could be ruled from a single city and still survive more than a thousand years. The Government of the Roman Empire is the only sourcebook to concentrate on the administration of the empire, using the evidence of contemporary writers and historians. Specifically designed for students, with extensive cross-referencing, bibliographies and introductions and explanations for each item, this new edition brings the book right up-to-date, and makes it the ideal resource for students of the subject.
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Wounds of Honour, Arrows of Fury, Fortress of Spears

Author: Anthony Riches

Publisher: Hodder & Stoughton

ISBN: 1473654181

Category: Fiction

Page: 1248

View: 4278

The first three stories in Anthony Riches' thrilling EMPIRE series, now available in one page-turning collection, including Wounds of Honour, Arrows of Fury and Fortress of Spears. Wounds of Honour Marcus Aquila has scarcely landed in Britannia when he has to run for his life - condemned to dishonorable death by power-crazed emperor Commodus. The plan is to take a new name, serve in an obscure regiment on Hadrian's Wall and lie low until he can hope for justice. Then a rebel army sweeps down from north of the Wall, and Marcus has to prove he's tough enough to lead a century in the front line of a brutal war. Arrows of Fury The new Roman governor of Britannia must stamp out the northern rebellion or risk losing the province. For Marcus - Centurion Corvus of the 1st Tungrians - the campaign has become doubly dangerous. As reinforcements flood into Britannia he is surrounded by new officers with no reason to protect him. Death could result from a careless word as easily as from an enemy spear. Worse, one of them is close on his heels. The prefect of the 2nd Tungrians has discovered his secret. Only a miracle can save Marcus from disgrace and death . . . Fortress of Spears Marcus Aquila - burning for revenge on an enemy that has killed one of his best friends - rides north with the Petriana cavalry. He believes his disguise as Centurion Corvus of the 2nd Tungrians is still holding. But he is just a few days ahead of two of the emperor's agents, sent from Rome to kill him. Pitiless assassins who know his real name, and too much about his friends.
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Author: W.E.B. Griffin,William E. Butterworth IV

Publisher: Penguin

ISBN: 1101602171

Category: Fiction

Page: 672

View: 9725

October 1945. The war is over. The OSS has been disbanded. But for Cletus Frade and his colleagues in the OSS, the fight goes on… In the closing months of the war, the United States made a secret deal with Reinhard Gehlen, head of German intelligence’s Soviet section. In exchange for a treasure trove of intelligence on the Soviets and their spies within the U.S. atomic bomb program, Gehlen’s people would be spirited to safety in Argentina. Only a handful of people know about the deal. If word got out, all hell would break loose—and the U.S. would lose some of the most valuable intelligence sources they possess. It is up to Frade and company to keep them safe. But some people have other ideas...
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Essays in Honour of David Fieldhouse

Author: Peter Burroughs,A.J. Stockwell

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1134728980

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 272

View: 9974

This collection of essays honours David Fieldhouse, latterly Vere Harmsworth Professor of Imperial and Naval History at Cambridge and a foremost authority on the economics of the modern British Empire. The contributors include an impressive array of former students, colleagues, and friends, and their subjects range widely across the economic and administrative fields of British imperial history in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Reflecting many of Fieldhouse's own areas of scholarly interest, the essays address economics and business, theories of imperialism, strategies of administration, and decolonization.
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Essays in Honour of Brian Bosworth

Author: Pat Wheatley,Senior Lecturer in Classics and Ancient History Pat Wheatley,Elizabeth Baynham,Senior Lecturer in Classics Elizabeth Baynham

Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA

ISBN: 9780199693429

Category: Greece

Page: 464

View: 7135

The essays in this volume - written by twenty international scholars - are dedicated to Professor Brian Bosworth who has, in over forty-five years, produced arguably the most influential corpus of historical and historiographical research by one scholar. Professor Bosworth's name is often synonymous with scholarship on Alexander the Great, but his expertise also spreads far wider, as the scope of these essays demonstrates. The collection's coverage ranges from Egyptian and Homeric parallels, through Roman historiography, to Byzantine coinage. However, the life of Alexander provides the volume's central theme, and among the topics explored are the conqueror's resonance with mythological figures such as Achilles and Heracles, his divine pretensions and military display, and his motives for arresting his expedition at the River Hyphasis in India. Some of Alexander's political acts are also scrutinized, as are the identities of those supposedly present in the last symposium where, according to some sources, the fatal poison was administered to the king. Part of the collection focuses on Alexander's legacy, with seven essays examining the Successors, especially Craterus, and Ptolemy, and Alexander's ill-fated surviving dynasty, including Olympias, Eurydice, and Philip III Arrhidaeus.
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Essays in Honour of Glyndwr Williams

Author: Glyndwr Williams

Publisher: UBC Press

ISBN: 9780774807586

Category: History

Page: 334

View: 1424

A new interest in European maritime exploration was aroused with thepublication of the first volume of J.C. Beaglehole's edition ofThe Journals of Captain James Cook in 1955. In the forty-oddyears since then, our knowledge of this exploration -- and of theimperialism of which it was a part -- has expanded enormously. We nowrecognise that the scientific endeavours, once seen as disinterestedmanifestations of the Enlightenment, actually had both strategic andcommercial implications. And today much greater emphasis is given tothe meanings of early encounters for both the Natives of the Pacificislands and the Strangers from the European world.
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A History of Battle in Classical Antiquity

Author: J. E. Lendon

Publisher: Yale University Press

ISBN: 9780300119794

Category: History

Page: 468

View: 655

What set the successful armies of Sparta, Macedon, and Rome apart from those they defeated? In this major new history of battle from the age of Homer through the decline of the Roman empire, J. E. Lendon surveys a millennium of warfare to discover how militaries change--and don't change--and how an army's greatness depends on its use of the past. Noting this was an age that witnessed few technological advances, J. E. Lendon shows us that the most successful armies were those that made the most effective use of cultural tradition. Ancient combat moved forward by looking backward for inspiration--the Greeks, to Homer; the Romans, to the Greeks and to their own heroic past. The best ancient armies recruited soldiers from societies with strong competitive traditions; and the best ancient leaders, from Alexander to Julius Caesar, called upon those traditions to encourage ferocious competition at every rank. Ranging from the Battle of Champions between Sparta and Argos in 550 B.C. through Julian's invasion of Persia in A.D. 363, Soldiers and Ghosts brings to life the most decisive military contests of ancient Greece and Rome. Lendon places these battles, and the methods by which they were fought, in a sweeping narrative of ancient military history. On every battlefield, living soldiers fought alongside the ghosts of tradition--ghosts that would inspire greatness for almost a millennium before ultimately coming to stifle it.
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The Peloponnesian War Begins

Author: J. E. Lendon

Publisher: Basic Books

ISBN: 0465015069

Category: History

Page: 576

View: 2716

Offers a thrilling account of the first stage of the Peloponnesian War, also known as the Ten Years' War, between the city-states of Athens and Sparta, detailing the pitched battles by land and sea, sieges, sacks, raids and deeds of cruelty—along with courageous acts of mercy, charity and resistance.
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Essays in Honour of Andrew Porter

Author: Robert Holland,Sarah Stockwell

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1317990757

Category: History

Page: 232

View: 8068

This book comprises essays offered by friends, colleagues, and former students in tribute to Andrew Porter, on the occasion of his retirement from the Rhodes Chair in Imperial History at the University of London. The contributors, including many distinguished historians, explore through a variety of case studies ‘ambiguities of empire’ and of imperial and quasi-imperial relationships, reflecting important themes in Professor Porter’s own writing. Whilst the range of articles reflects the breadth of Andrew Porter’s scholarly collaborations and interests, the chapters focus in particular on two aspects of imperial history which have been the subject of his particular attention: religion and empire and the end of empire. The book contains original pieces on the history of British imperialism currently the subject of considerable scholarly attention. The book will be invaluable to students and scholars of empire, religion and colonialism. This book was published as a special issue of the Journal of Imperial and Commonwealth History.
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1 Corinthians in its Greco-Roman Social Setting

Author: Mark T. Finney

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN: 0567386791

Category: Religion

Page: 312

View: 440

In this volume, Finney argues that the conflict in 1 Corinthians is driven by lust for honour and Paul's use of the paradigm of the cross. Studies in contemporary social anthropology have noted the importance of male honour and how this is able to generate ideas of social identity within a community and to elucidate patterns of social behaviour. Finney examines the letter of 1 Corinthians , which presents a unique expose of numerous aspects of social life in the first-century Greco-Roman world where honour was of central importance. At the same time, filotimia (the love and lust for honour) also had the capacity to generate an environment of competition, antagonism, factionalism, and conflict, all of which are clearly evident within the pages of 1 Corinthians . Finney seeks to examine the extent to which the social constraints of filotimia, and its potential for conflict, lay behind the many problems evident within the nascent Christ-movement at Corinth. Finney presents a fresh reading of the letter, and the thesis it proposes is that the honour-conflict model, hitherto overlooked in studies on 1 Corinthians , provides an appropriate and compelling framework within which to view the many disparate aspects of the letter in their social context. Formerly the Journal for the Study of the New Testament Supplement , this is a book series that explores the many aspects of New Testament study including historical perspectives, social-scientific and literary theory, and theological, cultural and contextual approaches.
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Author: Raymond E. Feist,Janny Wurts

Publisher: HarperCollins UK

ISBN: 0007375646

Category: Fiction

Page: 528

View: 7492

Book one in the magnificent Empire Trilogy by bestselling authors Raymond E. Feist and Janny Wurts, now available in ebook format.
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