Near Eastern Influences on Ancient Greek and Roman Law

Author: Raymond Westbrook,Deborah Lyons,Kurt Raaflaub

Publisher: JHU Press

ISBN: 1421414678

Category: History

Page: 288

View: 4508

Throughout the twelve essays that appear in Ex Oriente Lex, Raymond Westbrook convincingly argues that the influence of Mesopotamian legal traditions and thought did not stop at the shores of the Mediterranean, but rather had a profound impact on the early laws and legal developments of Greece and Rome as well. He presents readers with tantalizing fragments of early Greek or archaic Roman law which, when placed in the context of the broader Near Eastern tradition, suddenly acquire unexpected new meanings. Before his untimely death in July 2009, Westbrook was regarded as one of the world’s leading authorities on ancient legal history. Although his main field was ancient Near Eastern law, he also made important contributions to the study of early Greek and Roman law. In his examination of the relationship between ancient Near Eastern and pre-classical Greek and Roman law, Westbrook sought to demonstrate that the connection between the two legal spheres was not merely theoretical but also concrete. The Near Eastern legal heritage had practical consequences that help us understand puzzling individual cases in the Greek and Roman traditions. His essays provide rich material for further reflection and interdisciplinary discussion about compelling similarities between legal cultures and the continuity of legal traditions over several millennia. Aimed at classicists and ancient historians, as well as biblicists, Egyptologists, Assyriologists, and legal historians, this volume gathers many of Westbrook’s most important essays on the legal aspects of Near Eastern cultural influences on the Greco-Roman world, including one new, never-before-published piece. A preface by editors Deborah Lyons and Kurt Raaflaub details the importance of Westbrook’s work for the field of classics, while Sophie Démare-Lafont’s incisive introduction places Westbrook’s ideas within the wider context of ancient law.
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The Jurisdiction of the Lotus-Eaters

Author: Piyel Haldar

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1135897557

Category: Law

Page: 200

View: 3107

Focusing on the ‘problem’ of pleasure Law, Orientalism and Postcolonialism uncovers the organizing principles by which the legal subject was colonized. That occidental law was complicit in colonial expansion is obvious. What remains to be addressed, however, is the manner in which law and legal discourse sought to colonize individual subjects as subjects of law. It was through the permission of pleasure that modern Western subjects were refined and domesticated. Legally sanctioned outlets for private and social enjoyment instilled and continue to instil within the individual tight self-control over behaviour. There are, however, states of behaviour considered to be repugnant to, and in excess of, modern codes of civility. Drawing on a broad range of literature, (including classical jurisprudence, eighteenth century Orientalist scholarship, early travel literature, and nineteenth century debates surrounding the rule of law), yet concentrating on the experience of British India, the argument here is that such excesses were deemed to be an Oriental phenomenon. Through the encounter with the Orient and with the fantasy of its excess, Piyel Haldar concludes, the relationship between the subject and the law was transformed, and must therefore be re-assessed.
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Cross-cultural Studies in Glocalization

Author: Eugene Chen Eoyang

Publisher: Lexington Books

ISBN: 9780739105009

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 219

View: 4885

Two-Way Mirrors engages in cross-cultural study—a pursuit inherently both reflective and reflexive, shedding light not only on the object of study but also on the subject conducting the study. The book's leading metaphor is that of the shop window, which is at once transparent (allowing a view of the merchandise on display) and reflective (offering an image of the prospective shopper). Eugene Eoyang confronts the topics of globalization, postmodernism, and the other as self, bi-directionally, from both an Asian and a Western perspective. He celebrates the continuing development of comparative literature, a discipline particularly well suited to cross-cultural exploration.
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Author: Michael David Coogan

Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA

ISBN: 0195139372

Category: Religion

Page: 487

View: 4841

Examines the history, art, architecture, languages, literatures, society, and religion of Biblical Israel and early Judaism and Christianity
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Author: Modern Greek Studies Association

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Greek language, Modern

Page: N.A

View: 7936

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a collective biography of the authors of the Encyclopédie

Author: Frank A. Kafker

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 222

View: 5095

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Author: Jacqueline Fabre-Serris,Alison Keith

Publisher: JHU Press

ISBN: 1421417634

Category: History

Page: 360

View: 958

The martial virtues—courage, loyalty, cunning, and strength—were central to male identity in the ancient world, and antique literature is replete with depictions of men cultivating and exercising these virtues on the battlefield. In Women and War in Antiquity, sixteen scholars reexamine classical sources to uncover the complex but hitherto unexplored relationship between women and war in ancient Greece and Rome. They reveal that women played a much more active role in battle than previously assumed, embodying martial virtues in both real and mythological combat. The essays in the collection, taken from the first meeting of the European Research Network on Gender Studies in Antiquity, approach the topic from philological, historical, and material culture perspectives. The contributors examine discussions of women and war in works that span the ancient canon, from Homer’s epics and the major tragedies in Greece to Seneca’s stoic writings in first-century Rome. They consider a vast panorama of scenes in which women are portrayed as spectators, critics, victims, causes, and beneficiaries of war. This deft volume, which ultimately challenges the conventional scholarly opposition of standards of masculinity and femininity, will appeal to scholars and students of the classical world, European warfare, and gender studies. -- Kurt Raaflaub, Brown University, coeditor of Raymond Westbrook’
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an introduction to ethics

Author: William Henry Roberts

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Philosophy

Page: 416

View: 7631

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Author: Katharine B. Free

Publisher: Edwin Mellen Pr

ISBN: N.A

Category: Religion

Page: 278

View: 1972

These papers examine the formulation of the Christian individual from conflicts with rival ideologies, from periods of repression and persecution, and from changing social realities.
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Gender and Exchange in Ancient Greece

Author: Deborah Lyons

Publisher: University of Texas Press

ISBN: 0292742762

Category: History

Page: 182

View: 1680

Deianeira sends her husband Herakles a poisoned robe. Eriphyle trades the life of her husband Amphiaraos for a golden necklace. Atreus’s wife Aerope gives away the token of his sovereignty, a lamb with a golden fleece, to his brother Thyestes, who has seduced her. Gifts and exchanges always involve a certain risk in any culture, but in the ancient Greek imagination, women and gifts appear to be a particularly deadly combination. This book explores the role of gender in exchange as represented in ancient Greek culture, including Homeric epic and tragedy, non-literary texts, and iconographic and historical evidence of various kinds. Using extensive insights from anthropological work on marriage, kinship, and exchange, as well as ethnographic parallels from other traditional societies, Deborah Lyons probes the gendered division of labor among both gods and mortals, the role of marriage (and its failure) in transforming women from objects to agents of exchange, the equivocal nature of women as exchange-partners, and the importance of the sister-brother bond in understanding the economic and social place of women in ancient Greece. Her findings not only enlarge our understanding of social attitudes and practices in Greek antiquity but also demonstrate the applicability of ethnographic techniques and anthropological theory to the study of ancient societies.
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Author: George E. Demacopoulos,Aristotle Papanikolaou

Publisher: Fordham University Press

ISBN: 0823252094

Category: Religion

Page: 352

View: 5719

The category of the "West" has played a particularly significant role in the modern Eastern Orthodox imagination. It has functioned as an absolute marker of difference from what is considered to be the essence of Orthodoxy, and, thus, ironically, has become a constitutive aspect of the modern Orthodox self. The essays collected in this volume examines the many factors that contributed to the "Eastern" construction of the "West" in order to understand why the "West" is so important to the Eastern Christian's sense of self.
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