The Historian's Macroscope

Author: Shawn Graham,Ian Milligan,Scott Weingart

Publisher: World Scientific Publishing Company

ISBN: 1783266112

Category: Computers

Page: 308

View: 4102

The Digital Humanities have arrived at a moment when digital Big Data is becoming more readily available, opening exciting new avenues of inquiry but also new challenges. This pioneering book describes and demonstrates the ways these data can be explored to construct cultural heritage knowledge, for research and in teaching and learning. It helps humanities scholars to grasp Big Data in order to do their work, whether that means understanding the underlying algorithms at work in search engines, or designing and using their own tools to process large amounts of information. Demonstrating what digital tools have to offer and also what 'digital' does to how we understand the past, the authors introduce the many different tools and developing approaches in Big Data for historical and humanistic scholarship, show how to use them, what to be wary of, and discuss the kinds of questions and new perspectives this new macroscopic perspective opens up. Authored 'live' online with ongoing feedback from the wider digital history community, Exploring Big Historical Data breaks new ground and sets the direction for the conversation into the future. It represents the current state-of-the-art thinking in the field and exemplifies the way that digital work can enhance public engagement in the humanities. Exploring Big Historical Data should be the go-to resource for undergraduate and graduate students confronted by a vast corpus of data, and researchers encountering these methods for the first time. It will also offer a helping hand to the interested individual seeking to make sense of genealogical data or digitized newspapers, and even the local historical society who are trying to see the value in digitizing their holdings. The companion website to Exploring Big Historical Data can be found at http://www.themacroscope.org/. On this site you will find code, a discussion forum, essays, and datafiles that accompany this book.
Read More

Author: Steven E. Jones

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 113620234X

Category: Social Science

Page: 224

View: 9239

The past decade has seen a profound shift in our collective understanding of the digital network. What was once understood to be a transcendent virtual reality is now experienced as a ubiquitous grid of data that we move through and interact with every day, raising new questions about the social, locative, embodied, and object-oriented nature of our experience in the networked world. In The Emergence of the Digital Humanities, Steven E. Jones examines this shift in our relationship to digital technology and the ways that it has affected humanities scholarship and the academy more broadly. Based on the premise that the network is now everywhere rather than merely "out there," Jones links together seemingly disparate cultural events—the essential features of popular social media, the rise of motion-control gaming and mobile platforms, the controversy over the "gamification" of everyday life, the spatial turn, fabrication and 3D printing, and electronic publishing—and argues that cultural responses to changes in technology provide an essential context for understanding the emergence of the digital humanities as a new field of study in this millennium.
Read More

Digital Methods and Literary History

Author: Matthew L. Jockers

Publisher: University of Illinois Press

ISBN: 025209476X

Category: Computers

Page: 208

View: 2773

In this volume, Matthew L. Jockers introduces readers to large-scale literary computing and the revolutionary potential of macroanalysis--a new approach to the study of the literary record designed for probing the digital-textual world as it exists today, in digital form and in large quantities. Using computational analysis to retrieve key words, phrases, and linguistic patterns across thousands of texts in digital libraries, researchers can draw conclusions based on quantifiable evidence regarding how literary trends are employed over time, across periods, within regions, or within demographic groups, as well as how cultural, historical, and societal linkages may bind individual authors, texts, and genres into an aggregate literary culture. Moving beyond the limitations of literary interpretation based on the "close-reading" of individual works, Jockers describes how this new method of studying large collections of digital material can help us to better understand and contextualize the individual works within those collections.
Read More

Author: Piers Anthony

Publisher: Mundania Press

ISBN: 097236708X

Category: Fiction

Page: 428

View: 7936

Throughout history, man has been searching for better ways to gather information about his universe. But although they may have longed for it, not even the most brilliant minds could conceive of a device as infinitely powerful or as immeasurably precise as the Macroscope, until the twenty-first century. This is a story of mans desperate search for a compromise between his mind and his heart, between knowledge and humanity.
Read More

Author: Lisa Gitelman,Geoffrey B. Pingree

Publisher: MIT Press

ISBN: 9780262572286

Category: History

Page: 271

View: 7950

A cultural history of media that were "new media" in the eighteenth, nineteenth, and twentieth centuries.
Read More

Author: Jack Dougherty,Kristen Nawrotzki

Publisher: University of Michigan Press

ISBN: 0472052063

Category: History

Page: 283

View: 629

"Writing History in the Digital Age began as a one-month experiment in October 2010, featuring chapter-length essays by a wide array of scholars with the goal of rethinking traditional practices of researching, writing, and publishing, and the broader implications of digital technology for the historical profession. The essays and discussion topics were posted on a WordPress platform with a special plug-in that allowed readers to add paragraph-level comments in the margins, transforming the work into socially networked texts. This first installment drew an enthusiastic audience, over 50 comments on the texts, and over 1,000 unique visitors to the site from across the globe, with many who stayed on the site for a significant period of time to read the work. To facilitate this new volume, Jack Dougherty and Kristen Nawrotzki designed a born-digital, open-access platform to capture reader comments on drafts and shape the book as it developed. Following a period of open peer review and discussion, the finished product now presents 20 essays from a wide array of notable scholars, each examining (and then breaking apart and reexamining) how digital and emergent technologies have changed the ways that historians think, teach, author, and publish"--
Read More

An Introduction to Quantitative Approaches

Author: Pat Hudson,Mina Ishizu

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN: 1849665737

Category: History

Page: 360

View: 8193

Fully updated and carefully revised, this new 2nd edition of History by Numbers still stands alone as the only textbook on quantitative methods suitable for students of history. Even the numerically challenged will find inspiration. Taking a problem-solving approach and using authentic historical data, it describes each method in turn, including its origin, purpose, usefulness and associated pitfalls. The problems are developed gradually and with narrative skill, allowing readers to experience the moment of discovery for each of the interpretative outcomes. Quantitative methods are essential for the modern historian, and this lively and accessible text will prove an invaluable guide for anyone entering the discipline.
Read More

Author: Wolfgang Behringer

Publisher: Polity

ISBN: 0745645291

Category: Science

Page: 295

View: 4409

Explores the latest historical research on the development of the earth's climate, showing how even minor changes in the climate could result in major social, political, and religious upheavals.
Read More

A History of Physics in the Twentieth Century

Author: Helge Kragh

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN: 9780691095523

Category: Science

Page: 494

View: 8526

At the end of the nineteenth century, some physicists believed that the basic principles underlying their subject were already known, and that physics in the future would only consist of filling in the details. They could hardly have been more wrong. The past century has seen the rise of quantum mechanics, relativity, cosmology, particle physics, and solid-state physics, among other fields. These subjects have fundamentally changed our understanding of space, time, and matter. They have also transformed daily life, inspiring a technological revolution that has included the development of radio, television, lasers, nuclear power, and computers. In Quantum Generations, Helge Kragh, one of the world's leading historians of physics, presents a sweeping account of these extraordinary achievements of the past one hundred years. The first comprehensive one-volume history of twentieth-century physics, the book takes us from the discovery of X rays in the mid-1890s to superstring theory in the 1990s. Unlike most previous histories of physics, written either from a scientific perspective or from a social and institutional perspective, Quantum Generations combines both approaches. Kragh writes about pure science with the expertise of a trained physicist, while keeping the content accessible to nonspecialists and paying careful attention to practical uses of science, ranging from compact disks to bombs. As a historian, Kragh skillfully outlines the social and economic contexts that have shaped the field in the twentieth century. He writes, for example, about the impact of the two world wars, the fate of physics under Hitler, Mussolini, and Stalin, the role of military research, the emerging leadership of the United States, and the backlash against science that began in the 1960s. He also shows how the revolutionary discoveries of scientists ranging from Einstein, Planck, and Bohr to Stephen Hawking have been built on the great traditions of earlier centuries. Combining a mastery of detail with a sure sense of the broad contours of historical change, Kragh has written a fitting tribute to the scientists who have played such a decisive role in the making of the modern world.
Read More

Author: Ann Curthoys,Ann McGrath

Publisher: Palgrave Macmillan

ISBN: 0230290388

Category: History

Page: 263

View: 8167

Writing history can take an author on a journey through time, across the globe and into the lives of others. This book offers great advice to writers, such as: * how much research is necessary? * when should you start writing? * should you structure your work chronologically or thematically? * how do you write a compelling narrative? Drawing upon the deep experience of two historians who have written many histories themselves, How to Write History that People want to Read explains how to succeed in writing exciting historical narratives. It explores why some historical writing is not so engaging, and why some of it is as good as any writing you will ever read. With many practical tips about how to research and write history in many different genres, Ann Curthoys and Ann McGrath provide moral support and experienced mentoring company for all historians involved in the often-lonely process of researching and writing. Perfect for historians of all levels, this book is an indispensable guide to writing history.
Read More

Towards an Oral History of Digital Humanities

Author: Julianne Nyhan,Andrew Flinn

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 3319201700

Category: Computers

Page: 285

View: 474

This book addresses the application of computing to cultural heritage and the discipline of Digital Humanities that formed around it. Digital Humanities research is transforming how the Human record can be transmitted, shaped, understood, questioned and imagined and it has been ongoing for more than 70 years. However, we have no comprehensive histories of its research trajectory or its disciplinary development. The authors make a first contribution towards remedying this by uncovering, documenting, and analysing a number of the social, intellectual and creative processes that helped to shape this research from the 1950s until the present day. By taking an oral history approach, this book explores questions like, among others, researchers’ earliest memories of encountering computers and the factors that subsequently prompted them to use the computer in Humanities research. Computation and the Humanities will be an essential read for cultural and computing historians, digital humanists and those interested in developments like the digitisation of cultural heritage and artefacts. This book is open access under a CC BY-NC 2.5 license
Read More

Using Web Archives to Understand the Past and the Present

Author: Niels Brügger,Ralph Schroeder

Publisher: UCL Press

ISBN: 1911307568

Category: History

Page: 296

View: 6241

The World Wide Web has now been in use for more than 20 years. From early browsers to today’s principal source of information, entertainment and much else, the Web is an integral part of our daily lives, to the extent that some people believe ‘if it’s not online, it doesn’t exist.’ While this statement is not entirely true, it is becoming increasingly accurate, and reflects the Web’s role as an indispensable treasure trove. It is curious, therefore, that historians and social scientists have thus far made little use of the Web to investigate historical patterns of culture and society, despite making good use of letters, novels, newspapers, radio and television programmes, and other pre-digital artefacts.This volume argues that now is the time to ask what we have learnt from the Web so far. The 12 chapters explore this topic from a number of interdisciplinary angles – through histories of national web spaces and case studies of different government and media domains – as well as an introduction that provides an overview of this exciting new area of research.
Read More

Why the Clustering of Like-Minded American is Tearing Us Apart

Author: Bill Bishop

Publisher: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt

ISBN: 0547525192

Category: Political Science

Page: 384

View: 1266

In 2004, journalist Bill Bishop coined the term "the big sort." Armed with startling new demographic data, he made national news in a series of articles showing how Americans have been sorting themselves into alarmingly homogeneous communities -- not by region or by state, but by city and even neighborhood. Over the past three decades, we have been choosing the neighborhood (and church and news show) compatible with our lifestyle and beliefs. The result is a country that has become so polarized, so ideologically inbred that people don't know and can't understand those who live a few miles away. How this came to be, and its dire implications for our country, is the subject of this ground-breaking work. In The Big Sort, Bishop has taken his analysis to a new level. He begins with stories about how we live today and then draws on history, economics and our changing political landscape to create one of the most compelling big-picture accounts of America in recent memory.
Read More

Macroscopic Approaches to Analysis

Author: William Andrefsky, Jr

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1139448196

Category: Social Science

Page: N.A

View: 2070

This book is a fully updated and revised edition of William Andrefsky Jr's ground-breaking manual on lithic analysis. Designed for students and professional archaeologists, this highly illustrated book explains the fundamental principles of the measurement, recording and analysis of stone tools and stone tool production debris. Introducing the reader to lithic raw materials, classification, terminology and key concepts, it comprehensively explores methods and techniques, presenting detailed case studies of lithic analysis from around the world. It examines new emerging techniques, such as the advances being made in lithic debitage analysis and lithic tool analysis, and includes a new section on stone tool functional studies. An extensive and expanded glossary makes this book an invaluable reference for archaeologists at all levels.
Read More

Author: James Frederick Ivey, MD

Publisher: Inspiring Voices

ISBN: 1491710993

Category: Religion

Page: 430

View: 7552

Based on the fundamental, profound, and comprehensive principle of "things are not as they seem," The Physics and Philosophy of the Bible establishes a paradigm that reattaches philosophy to physics, bringing it back whence it came while adding theology to the mix. Author James Frederick Ivey, MD, shows that this mind-set together with timeless thinking can lead one to new horizons of novel thinking about ultimate truth and truths.Ivey describes how modern physics, relativity, and quantum mechanics have revolutionized thinking about the likelihood of the existence of God and how the philosophies of Socrates and Plato meld nearly seamlessly with belief in a single deity and even with Judeo-Christianity.Through a variety of examples, thoughts from a diversity of authors and thinkers, and scriptural support, this study discusses Christian philosophy and apologetics, turning on a few fascinating concepts such as that of quantum observation in conjunction with God's method of creation and the derivation of God from all-goodness. It demonstrates that apologists are close to eliminating the necessity of having to deal with whether God exists or not.
Read More

Author: Stefan Thurner

Publisher: World Scientific

ISBN: 9813206861

Category: Science

Page: 92

View: 2562

Coping with the complexities of the social world in the 21st century requires deeper quantitative and predictive understanding. Forty-three internationally acclaimed scientists and thinkers share their vision for complexity science in the next decade in this invaluable book. Topics cover how complexity and big data science could help society to tackle the great challenges ahead, and how the newly established Complexity Science Hub Vienna might be a facilitator on this path.
Read More

A History

Author: Thomas S. Mullaney

Publisher: MIT Press

ISBN: 0262536102

Category: Technology & Engineering

Page: 504

View: 5730

How Chinese characters triumphed over the QWERTY keyboard and laid the foundation for China's information technology successes today. Chinese writing is character based, the one major world script that is neither alphabetic nor syllabic. Through the years, the Chinese written language encountered presumed alphabetic universalism in the form of Morse Code, Braille, stenography, Linotype, punch cards, word processing, and other systems developed with the Latin alphabet in mind. This book is about those encounters—in particular thousands of Chinese characters versus the typewriter and its QWERTY keyboard. Thomas Mullaney describes a fascinating series of experiments, prototypes, failures, and successes in the century-long quest for a workable Chinese typewriter. The earliest Chinese typewriters, Mullaney tells us, were figments of popular imagination, sensational accounts of twelve-foot keyboards with 5,000 keys. One of the first Chinese typewriters actually constructed was invented by a Christian missionary, who organized characters by common usage (but promoted the less-common characters for “Jesus" to the common usage level). Later came typewriters manufactured for use in Chinese offices, and typewriting schools that turned out trained “typewriter girls” and “typewriter boys.” Still later was the “Double Pigeon” typewriter produced by the Shanghai Calculator and Typewriter Factory, the typewriter of choice under Mao. Clerks and secretaries in this era experimented with alternative ways of organizing characters on their tray beds, inventing an input method that was the first instance of “predictive text.” Today, after more than a century of resistance against the alphabetic, not only have Chinese characters prevailed, they form the linguistic substrate of the vibrant world of Chinese information technology. The Chinese Typewriter, not just an “object history” but grappling with broad questions of technological change and global communication, shows how this happened. A Study of the Weatherhead East Asian Institute Columbia University
Read More

Author: Susan Schreibman,Ray Siemens,John Unsworth

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN: 0470999861

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 640

View: 9634

This Companion offers a thorough, concise overview of the emerging field of humanities computing. Contains 37 original articles written by leaders in the field. Addresses the central concerns shared by those interested in the subject. Major sections focus on the experience of particular disciplines in applying computational methods to research problems; the basic principles of humanities computing; specific applications and methods; and production, dissemination and archiving. Accompanied by a website featuring supplementary materials, standard readings in the field and essays to be included in future editions of the Companion.
Read More

Author: Ruben Verborgh,Max De Wilde

Publisher: Packt Publishing Ltd

ISBN: 1783289090

Category: Computers

Page: 114

View: 2304

The book is styled on a Cookbook, containing recipes - combined with free datasets - which will turn readers into proficient OpenRefine users in the fastest possible way.This book is targeted at anyone who works on or handles a large amount of data. No prior knowledge of OpenRefine is required, as we start from the very beginning and gradually reveal more advanced features. You don't even need your own dataset, as we provide example data to try out the book's recipes.
Read More