the story of a riddle that confounded the world's greatest minds for 358 years

Author: Simon Singh

Publisher: HarperCollins UK

ISBN: 000724181X

Category: Fermat's last theorem

Page: 362

View: 6023

This is the story of the solving of a puzzle that has confounded mathematicians since the 17th century, but which every child can understand. It includes the fascinating story of Andrew Wiles who finally cracked the code.
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Author: Gordon Burt

Publisher: Cambridge Scholars Publishing

ISBN: 1527515540

Category: Political Science

Page: 219

View: 9615

World events in 2017 have revealed the fundamental features of social systems and their trajectories. Is the world becoming a better place in terms of wellbeing, wealth, health, peace and the environment? The structure of power is changing, with the prominent roles played by Trump, Putin and Xi, and, while the West is growing and still dominant, the relative growth in the East is greater. Other cultural formations, such as languages, religions and political cultures, have also risen and fallen. How have different social groups related to one another, and how have social divisions manifested themselves in the different systems of society? An analysis of the surprising election in the UK here leads to a gravitational model of party trajectories in political space, while the fascinating 358-year trajectory of mathematical knowledge relating to Fermat’s Last Theorem and modularity is also presented. As such, this is a book about peace and conflict, politics, international relations, social science and quantitative methods.
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Successful and enjoyable teaching and learning

Author: Colin Foster

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1136311815

Category: Education

Page: 232

View: 6336

Combining research-based theory with fresh, practical guidance for the classroom, The Essential Guide to Secondary Mathematics is a stimulating new resource for all student and practising teachers looking for new ideas and inspiration. With an emphasis on exciting your mathematical and pedagogical passions, it focuses on the dynamics of the classroom and the process of designing and using rich mathematical tasks. Written by a highly experienced mathematics teacher who understands the realities of the secondary classroom, this book combines insights from the latest research into mathematical learning with useful strategies and ideas for engaging teaching. The text is punctuated by frequent tasks, some mathematical and others more reflective, which are designed to encourage independent thinking. Key topics covered include: Preparing yourself: thinking about mathematics and pedagogy, taking care of your health and dealing with stress Different styles of learning and teaching mathematics Ideas for lessons: what does it take to turn an idea into a lesson? Tasks, timings and resources Equality and dealing positively with difference Mathematical starters, fillers and finishers: achieving variety The mathematical classroom community: seating layouts, displays and practical considerations Assessment: effective strategies for responding to learners‘ mathematics and writing reports. The Essential Guide to Secondary Mathematics will be a valuable resource both for beginning teachers interested in developing their understanding, and for experienced teachers looking to re-evaluate their practice. Aiming to develop all aspects of your mathematics teaching, this book will help you to devise, adapt and implement ideas for successful and enjoyable teaching and learning.
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The Symmetry-breaking Force that Makes the World an Interesting Place

Author: Nicholas Mee

Publisher: James Clarke & Co.

ISBN: 0718892755

Category: Science

Page: 328

View: 2726

Higgs Force tells the story of how physicists have unlocked the secrets of matter and the forces of nature to produce dramatic modern understandings of the cosmos. For centuries researchers have followed this quest and now there is just one component of the modern synthesis of particle physics whose existence is yet to be confirmed in the laboratory – the Higgs particle. It explains how a universe built on simple symmetrical principles engenders life and exhibits the diversity and complexity that we see all around us.
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the great theorems of mathematics

Author: William Dunham

Publisher: Egully.com

ISBN: N.A

Category: Mathematics

Page: 300

View: 1928

A rare combination of the historical, biographical, and mathematicalgenius, this book is a fascinating introduction to a neglected field of human creativity. Dunham places mathematical theorem, along with masterpieces of art, music, and literature and gives them the attention they deserve.
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A Students’ Guide to the Enjoyment of Higher Mathematics

Author: N.A

Publisher: Macmillan International Higher Education

ISBN: 134909532X

Category:

Page: 205

View: 4568

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Unlocking the Secret of an Ancient Mathematical Problem

Author: Amir D. Aczel

Publisher: Basic Books (AZ)

ISBN: 9781568583600

Category: Mathematics

Page: 147

View: 4384

Simple, elegant, and utterly impossible to prove, Fermat's last theorem captured the imaginations of mathematicians for more than three centuries. For some, it became a wonderful passion. For others it was an obsession that led to deceit, intrigue, or insanity. In a volume filled with the clues, red herrings, and suspense of a mystery novel, Amir D. Aczel reveals the previously untold story of the people, the history, and the cultures that lie behind this scientific triumph. From formulas devised from the farmers of ancient Babylonia to the dramatic proof of Fermat's theorem in 1993, this extraordinary work takes us along on an exhilarating intellectual treasure hunt. Revealing the hidden mathematical order of the natural world in everything from stars to sunflowers, Fermat's Last Theorem brilliantly combines philosophy and hard science with investigative journalism. The result: a real-life detective story of the intellect, at once intriguing, thought-provoking, and impossible to put down.
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Author: Dr. Mehran Basti

Publisher: FriesenPress

ISBN: 1460239563

Category: Religion

Page: 280

View: 924

For Dr. Basti, the explanation is straightforward though not simple: "Just as cells have dna, so mathematics has DNA in its structure." After years of research, he decided that his work had to contain a strong philosophical justification in order to stand the test of time. Part memoir and part manifesto, DNA of Mathematics introduces Mehran Basti's readers to both the research he has dedicated his career to and his personal background and beliefs which significantly impact his scientific work.
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Bernhard Riemann and the Greatest Unsolved Problem in Mathematics

Author: John Derbyshire

Publisher: Joseph Henry Press

ISBN: 0309141257

Category: Science

Page: 446

View: 7094

In August 1859 Bernhard Riemann, a little-known 32-year old mathematician, presented a paper to the Berlin Academy titled: "On the Number of Prime Numbers Less Than a Given Quantity." In the middle of that paper, Riemann made an incidental remark â€" a guess, a hypothesis. What he tossed out to the assembled mathematicians that day has proven to be almost cruelly compelling to countless scholars in the ensuing years. Today, after 150 years of careful research and exhaustive study, the question remains. Is the hypothesis true or false? Riemann's basic inquiry, the primary topic of his paper, concerned a straightforward but nevertheless important matter of arithmetic â€" defining a precise formula to track and identify the occurrence of prime numbers. But it is that incidental remark â€" the Riemann Hypothesis â€" that is the truly astonishing legacy of his 1859 paper. Because Riemann was able to see beyond the pattern of the primes to discern traces of something mysterious and mathematically elegant shrouded in the shadows â€" subtle variations in the distribution of those prime numbers. Brilliant for its clarity, astounding for its potential consequences, the Hypothesis took on enormous importance in mathematics. Indeed, the successful solution to this puzzle would herald a revolution in prime number theory. Proving or disproving it became the greatest challenge of the age. It has become clear that the Riemann Hypothesis, whose resolution seems to hang tantalizingly just beyond our grasp, holds the key to a variety of scientific and mathematical investigations. The making and breaking of modern codes, which depend on the properties of the prime numbers, have roots in the Hypothesis. In a series of extraordinary developments during the 1970s, it emerged that even the physics of the atomic nucleus is connected in ways not yet fully understood to this strange conundrum. Hunting down the solution to the Riemann Hypothesis has become an obsession for many â€" the veritable "great white whale" of mathematical research. Yet despite determined efforts by generations of mathematicians, the Riemann Hypothesis defies resolution. Alternating passages of extraordinarily lucid mathematical exposition with chapters of elegantly composed biography and history, Prime Obsession is a fascinating and fluent account of an epic mathematical mystery that continues to challenge and excite the world. Posited a century and a half ago, the Riemann Hypothesis is an intellectual feast for the cognoscenti and the curious alike. Not just a story of numbers and calculations, Prime Obsession is the engrossing tale of a relentless hunt for an elusive proof â€" and those who have been consumed by it.
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Author: Simon Singh

Publisher: A&C Black

ISBN: 1408835312

Category: Social Science

Page: 272

View: 3496

You may have watched hundreds of episodes of The Simpsons (and its sister show Futurama) without ever realising that they contain enough maths to form an entire university course. In The Simpsons and Their Mathematical Secrets, Simon Singh explains how the brilliant writers, some of the mathematicians, have smuggled in mathematical jokes throughout the cartoon's twenty-five year history, exploring everything from to Mersenne primes, from Euler's equation to the unsolved riddle of P vs. NP, from perfect numbers to narcissistic numbers, and much more. With wit, clarity and a true fan's zeal, Singh analyses such memorable episodes as 'Bart the Genius' and 'HomerÂ3' to offer an entirely new insight into the most successful show in television history.
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Author: Godfrey Harold Hardy,E. M. Wright,Roger Heath-Brown,Joseph Silverman

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780199219865

Category: Mathematics

Page: 621

View: 1449

An Introduction to the Theory of Numbers by G.H. Hardy and E. M. Wright is found on the reading list of virtually all elementary number theory courses and is widely regarded as the primary and classic text in elementary number theory. This Sixth Edition has been extensively revised and updated to guide today's students through the key milestones and developments in number theory. Updates include a chapter on one of the mostimportant developments in number theory -- modular elliptic curves and their role in the proof of Fermat's Last Theorem -- a foreword by A. Wiles and comprehensively updated end-of-chapter notes detailing the key developments in number theory. Suggestions for further reading are also included for the more avid reader and the clarityof exposition is retained throughout making this textbook highly accessible to undergraduates in mathematics from the first year upwards.
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How Some of the Greatest Minds in History Helped Solve One of the Oldest Math Problems in the World

Author: George Szpiro

Publisher: John Wiley and Sons

ISBN: 0471086010

Category: Mathematics

Page: 296

View: 4994

Chronicles the quest for the answer to "Kepler's conjecture," a mathematical formula that perplexed mathematicians for four centuries.
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The Story of Paul Erdös and the Search for Mathematical Truth

Author: Paul Hoffman

Publisher: Fourth Estate (GB)

ISBN: 9781857028294

Category: Mathematicians

Page: 301

View: 3823

The biography of a mathematical genius. Paul Erdos was the most prolific pure mathematician in history and, arguably, the strangest too. 'A mathematical genius of the first order, Paul Erdos was totally obsessed with his subject -- he thought and wrote mathematics for nineteen hours a day until he died. He travelled constantly, living out of a plastic bag and had no interest in food, sex, companionship, art -- all that is usually indispensible to a human life. Paul Hoffman, in this marvellous biography, gives us a vivid and strangely moving portrait of this singular creature, one that brings out not only Erdos's genius and his oddness, but his warmth and sense of fun, the joyfulness of his strange life.' Oliver Sacks For six decades Erdos had no job, no hobbies, no wife, no home; he never learnt to cook, do laundry, drive a car and died a virgin. Instead he travelled the world with his mother in tow, arriving at the doorstep of esteemed mathematicians declaring 'My brain is open'. He travelled until his death at 83, racing across four continents to prove as many theorems as possible, fuelled by a diet of espresso and amphetamines. With more than 1,500 papers written or co-written,
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How Mathematical Genius Discovered the Language of Symmetry

Author: Mario Livio

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN: 9780743274623

Category: Mathematics

Page: 368

View: 4174

What do Bach's compositions, Rubik's Cube, the way we choose our mates, and the physics of subatomic particles have in common? All are governed by the laws of symmetry, which elegantly unify scientific and artistic principles. Yet the mathematical language of symmetry-known as group theory-did not emerge from the study of symmetry at all, but from an equation that couldn't be solved. For thousands of years mathematicians solved progressively more difficult algebraic equations, until they encountered the quintic equation, which resisted solution for three centuries. Working independently, two great prodigies ultimately proved that the quintic cannot be solved by a simple formula. These geniuses, a Norwegian named Niels Henrik Abel and a romantic Frenchman named Évariste Galois, both died tragically young. Their incredible labor, however, produced the origins of group theory. The first extensive, popular account of the mathematics of symmetry and order, The Equation That Couldn't Be Solved is told not through abstract formulas but in a beautifully written and dramatic account of the lives and work of some of the greatest and most intriguing mathematicians in history.
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A Guided Tour of Math, from One to Infinity

Author: Steven Henry Strogatz

Publisher: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt

ISBN: 0547517653

Category: MATHEMATICS

Page: 316

View: 3278

A comprehensive tour of leading mathematical ideas by an award-winning professor and columnist for the New York Times Opinionator series demonstrates how math intersects with philosophy, science and other aspects of everyday life. By the author of The Calculus of Friendship. 50,000 first printing.
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The New Mathematics of Chaos

Author: Ian Stewart

Publisher: Wiley-Blackwell

ISBN: 9780631232513

Category: Science

Page: 416

View: 3248

The revised and updated edition includes three completely new chapters on the prediction and control of chaotic systems. It also incorporates new information regarding the solar system and an account of complexity theory. This witty, lucid and engaging book makes the complex mathematics of chaos accessible and entertaining. Presents complex mathematics in an accessible style. Includes three new chapters on prediction in chaotic systems, control of chaotic systems, and on the concept of chaos. Provides a discussion of complexity theory.
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The Quest to Think the Unthinkable

Author: Brian Clegg

Publisher: Hachette UK

ISBN: 1472107640

Category: Mathematics

Page: 160

View: 6428

'Space is big. Really big. You just won't believe how vastly, hugely, mind-bogglingly big it is. I mean, you may think it's a long way down the street to the chemist, but that's just peanuts to space.' Douglas Adams, Hitch-hiker's Guide to the Galaxy We human beings have trouble with infinity - yet infinity is a surprisingly human subject. Philosophers and mathematicians have gone mad contemplating its nature and complexity - yet it is a concept routinely used by schoolchildren. Exploring the infinite is a journey into paradox. Here is a quantity that turns arithmetic on its head, making it feasible that 1 = 0. Here is a concept that enables us to cram as many extra guests as we like into an already full hotel. Most bizarrely of all, it is quite easy to show that there must be something bigger than infinity - when it surely should be the biggest thing that could possibly be. Brian Clegg takes us on a fascinating tour of that borderland between the extremely large and the ultimate that takes us from Archimedes, counting the grains of sand that would fill the universe, to the latest theories on the physical reality of the infinite. Full of unexpected delights, whether St Augustine contemplating the nature of creation, Newton and Leibniz battling over ownership of calculus, or Cantor struggling to publicise his vision of the transfinite, infinity's fascination is in the way it brings together the everyday and the extraordinary, prosaic daily life and the esoteric. Whether your interest in infinity is mathematical, philosophical, spiritual or just plain curious, this accessible book offers a stimulating and entertaining read.
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Author: Philip Davis,Reuben Hersh,Elena Anne Marchisotto

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN: 0817682953

Category: Mathematics

Page: 500

View: 4875

Winner of the 1983 National Book Award! "...a perfectly marvelous book about the Queen of Sciences, from which one will get a real feeling for what mathematicians do and who they are. The exposition is clear and full of wit and humor..." - The New Yorker (1983 National Book Award edition) Mathematics has been a human activity for thousands of years. Yet only a few people from the vast population of users are professional mathematicians, who create, teach, foster, and apply it in a variety of situations. The authors of this book believe that it should be possible for these professional mathematicians to explain to non-professionals what they do, what they say they are doing, and why the world should support them at it. They also believe that mathematics should be taught to non-mathematics majors in such a way as to instill an appreciation of the power and beauty of mathematics. Many people from around the world have told the authors that they have done precisely that with the first edition and they have encouraged publication of this revised edition complete with exercises for helping students to demonstrate their understanding. This edition of the book should find a new generation of general readers and students who would like to know what mathematics is all about. It will prove invaluable as a course text for a general mathematics appreciation course, one in which the student can combine an appreciation for the esthetics with some satisfying and revealing applications. The text is ideal for 1) a GE course for Liberal Arts students 2) a Capstone course for perspective teachers 3) a writing course for mathematics teachers. A wealth of customizable online course materials for the book can be obtained from Elena Anne Marchisotto ([email protected]) upon request.
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A Guide to the Universe

Author: Marcus Chown

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9780571315024

Category: Science

Page: 200

View: 8836

The two towering achievements of modern physics are quantum theory and Einstein's general theory of relativity. Together, they explain virtually everything about the world we live in. But, almost a century after their advent, most people haven't the slightest clue what either is about. Did you know that there's so much empty space inside matter that the entire human race could be squeezed into the volume of a sugar cube? Or that you grow old more quickly on the top floor of a building than on the ground floor? And did you realize that 1% of the static on a TV tuned between stations is the relic of the Big Bang? Marcus Chown, the bestselling author of What A Wonderful World and the Solar System app, explains all with characteristic wit, colour and clarity, from the Big Bang and Einstein's general theory of relativity to probability, gravity and quantum theory. 'Chown discusses special and general relativity, probablity waves, quantum entanglement, gravity and the Big Bang, with humour and beautiful clarity, always searching for the most vivid imagery.' Steven Poole, Guardian
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The Secret History of Codes and Codebreaking

Author: Simon Singh

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9781841154350

Category: Ciphers

Page: 224

View: 4298

A TV tie-in edition of The Code Book filmed as a prime-time five-part Channel 4 series on the history of codes and code-breaking and presented by the author. This book, which accompanies the major Channel 4 series, brings to life the hidden history of codes and code breaking. Since the birth of writing, there has also been the need for secrecy. The story of codes is the story of the brilliant men and women who used mathematics, linguistics, machines, computers, gut instinct, logic and detective work to encrypt and break these secrect messages and the effect their work has had on history.
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