the story of a riddle that confounded the world's greatest minds for 358 years

Author: Simon Singh

Publisher: HarperCollins UK

ISBN: 000724181X

Category: Fermat's last theorem

Page: 362

View: 9011

This is the story of the solving of a puzzle that has confounded mathematicians since the 17th century, but which every child can understand. It includes the fascinating story of Andrew Wiles who finally cracked the code.
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Author: Gordon Burt

Publisher: Cambridge Scholars Publishing

ISBN: 1527515540

Category: Political Science

Page: 219

View: 6646

World events in 2017 have revealed the fundamental features of social systems and their trajectories. Is the world becoming a better place in terms of wellbeing, wealth, health, peace and the environment? The structure of power is changing, with the prominent roles played by Trump, Putin and Xi, and, while the West is growing and still dominant, the relative growth in the East is greater. Other cultural formations, such as languages, religions and political cultures, have also risen and fallen. How have different social groups related to one another, and how have social divisions manifested themselves in the different systems of society? An analysis of the surprising election in the UK here leads to a gravitational model of party trajectories in political space, while the fascinating 358-year trajectory of mathematical knowledge relating to Fermat’s Last Theorem and modularity is also presented. As such, this is a book about peace and conflict, politics, international relations, social science and quantitative methods.
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Set Theory, Measuring Theories, and Nominalism

Author: Gerhard Preyer,Georg Peter

Publisher: Walter de Gruyter

ISBN: 3110323680

Category: Philosophy

Page: 184

View: 3084

One main interest of philosophy is to become clear about the assumptions, premisses and inconsistencies of our thoughts and theories. And even for a formal language like mathematics it is controversial if consistency is acheivable or necessary like the articles in the firt part of the publication show. Also the role of formal derivations, the role of the concept of apriority, and the intuitions of mathematical principles and properties need to be discussed. The second part is a contribution on nominalistic and platonistic views in mathematics, like the "indispensability argument" of W. v. O. Quine H. Putnam and the "makes no difference argument" of A. Baker. Not only in retrospect, the third part shows the problems of Mill, Frege's and the unity of mathematics and Descartes's contradictional conception of mathematical essences. Together, these articles give us a hint into the relationship between mathematics and world, that is, one of the central problems in philosophy of mathematics and philosophy of science.
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Successful and enjoyable teaching and learning

Author: Colin Foster

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1136311815

Category: Education

Page: 232

View: 6980

Combining research-based theory with fresh, practical guidance for the classroom, The Essential Guide to Secondary Mathematics is a stimulating new resource for all student and practising teachers looking for new ideas and inspiration. With an emphasis on exciting your mathematical and pedagogical passions, it focuses on the dynamics of the classroom and the process of designing and using rich mathematical tasks. Written by a highly experienced mathematics teacher who understands the realities of the secondary classroom, this book combines insights from the latest research into mathematical learning with useful strategies and ideas for engaging teaching. The text is punctuated by frequent tasks, some mathematical and others more reflective, which are designed to encourage independent thinking. Key topics covered include: Preparing yourself: thinking about mathematics and pedagogy, taking care of your health and dealing with stress Different styles of learning and teaching mathematics Ideas for lessons: what does it take to turn an idea into a lesson? Tasks, timings and resources Equality and dealing positively with difference Mathematical starters, fillers and finishers: achieving variety The mathematical classroom community: seating layouts, displays and practical considerations Assessment: effective strategies for responding to learners‘ mathematics and writing reports. The Essential Guide to Secondary Mathematics will be a valuable resource both for beginning teachers interested in developing their understanding, and for experienced teachers looking to re-evaluate their practice. Aiming to develop all aspects of your mathematics teaching, this book will help you to devise, adapt and implement ideas for successful and enjoyable teaching and learning.
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A Mathematical Adventure

Author: Cédric Villani

Publisher: Farrar, Straus and Giroux

ISBN: 0374710236

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 272

View: 3643

In 2010, French mathematician Cédric Villani received the Fields Medal, the most coveted prize in mathematics, in recognition of a proof which he devised with his close collaborator Clément Mouhot to explain one of the most surprising theories in classical physics. Birth of a Theorem is Villani's own account of the years leading up to the award. It invites readers inside the mind of a great mathematician as he wrestles with the most important work of his career. But you don't have to understand nonlinear Landau damping to love Birth of a Theorem. It doesn't simplify or overexplain; rather, it invites readers into collaboration. Villani's diaries, emails, and musings enmesh you in the process of discovery. You join him in unproductive lulls and late-night breakthroughs. You're privy to the dining-hall conversations at the world's greatest research institutions. Villani shares his favorite songs, his love of manga, and the imaginative stories he tells his children. In mathematics, as in any creative work, it is the thinker's whole life that propels discovery—and with Birth of a Theorem, Cédric Villani welcomes you into his.
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How Mathematical Genius Discovered the Language of Symmetry

Author: Mario Livio

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN: 9780743274623

Category: Mathematics

Page: 368

View: 9682

What do Bach's compositions, Rubik's Cube, the way we choose our mates, and the physics of subatomic particles have in common? All are governed by the laws of symmetry, which elegantly unify scientific and artistic principles. Yet the mathematical language of symmetry-known as group theory-did not emerge from the study of symmetry at all, but from an equation that couldn't be solved. For thousands of years mathematicians solved progressively more difficult algebraic equations, until they encountered the quintic equation, which resisted solution for three centuries. Working independently, two great prodigies ultimately proved that the quintic cannot be solved by a simple formula. These geniuses, a Norwegian named Niels Henrik Abel and a romantic Frenchman named Évariste Galois, both died tragically young. Their incredible labor, however, produced the origins of group theory. The first extensive, popular account of the mathematics of symmetry and order, The Equation That Couldn't Be Solved is told not through abstract formulas but in a beautifully written and dramatic account of the lives and work of some of the greatest and most intriguing mathematicians in history.
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A Students’ Guide to the Enjoyment of Higher Mathematics

Author: N.A

Publisher: Macmillan International Higher Education

ISBN: 134909532X

Category:

Page: 205

View: 6292

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the great theorems of mathematics

Author: William Dunham

Publisher: Egully.com

ISBN: N.A

Category: Mathematics

Page: 300

View: 412

A rare combination of the historical, biographical, and mathematicalgenius, this book is a fascinating introduction to a neglected field of human creativity. Dunham places mathematical theorem, along with masterpieces of art, music, and literature and gives them the attention they deserve.
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Author: Simon Singh

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing USA

ISBN: 1620402777

Category: Art

Page: 253

View: 7969

Based on interviews with the writers of The Simpsons and accompanied by images from the show, facsimiles of scripts, paintings and drawings and other imagery, this fascinating book reveals the meaningful mathematical concepts behind the most successful show in TV history.
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Author: Dr. Mehran Basti

Publisher: FriesenPress

ISBN: 1460239563

Category: Religion

Page: 280

View: 4193

For Dr. Basti, the explanation is straightforward though not simple: "Just as cells have dna, so mathematics has DNA in its structure." After years of research, he decided that his work had to contain a strong philosophical justification in order to stand the test of time. Part memoir and part manifesto, DNA of Mathematics introduces Mehran Basti's readers to both the research he has dedicated his career to and his personal background and beliefs which significantly impact his scientific work.
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The Book That Inspired the Film "The Imitation Game"

Author: Andrew Hodges

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN: 1400865123

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 768

View: 3231

A NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER The official book behind the Academy Award-winning film The Imitation Game, starring Benedict Cumberbatch and Keira Knightley It is only a slight exaggeration to say that the British mathematician Alan Turing (1912-1954) saved the Allies from the Nazis, invented the computer and artificial intelligence, and anticipated gay liberation by decades--all before his suicide at age forty-one. This New York Times–bestselling biography of the founder of computer science, with a new preface by the author that addresses Turing's royal pardon in 2013, is the definitive account of an extraordinary mind and life. Capturing both the inner and outer drama of Turing’s life, Andrew Hodges tells how Turing’s revolutionary idea of 1936--the concept of a universal machine--laid the foundation for the modern computer and how Turing brought the idea to practical realization in 1945 with his electronic design. The book also tells how this work was directly related to Turing’s leading role in breaking the German Enigma ciphers during World War II, a scientific triumph that was critical to Allied victory in the Atlantic. At the same time, this is the tragic account of a man who, despite his wartime service, was eventually arrested, stripped of his security clearance, and forced to undergo a humiliating treatment program--all for trying to live honestly in a society that defined homosexuality as a crime. The inspiration for a major motion picture starring Benedict Cumberbatch and Keira Knightley, Alan Turing: The Enigma is a gripping story of mathematics, computers, cryptography, and homosexual persecution.
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Author: Simon Singh

Publisher: A&C Black

ISBN: 1408835312

Category: Social Science

Page: 272

View: 1566

You may have watched hundreds of episodes of The Simpsons (and its sister show Futurama) without ever realising that they contain enough maths to form an entire university course. In The Simpsons and Their Mathematical Secrets, Simon Singh explains how the brilliant writers, some of the mathematicians, have smuggled in mathematical jokes throughout the cartoon's twenty-five year history, exploring everything from to Mersenne primes, from Euler's equation to the unsolved riddle of P vs. NP, from perfect numbers to narcissistic numbers, and much more. With wit, clarity and a true fan's zeal, Singh analyses such memorable episodes as 'Bart the Genius' and 'HomerÂ3' to offer an entirely new insight into the most successful show in television history.
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The Quest to Think the Unthinkable

Author: Brian Clegg

Publisher: Robinson

ISBN: 1472107640

Category: Mathematics

Page: 160

View: 6070

'Space is big. Really big. You just won't believe how vastly, hugely, mind-bogglingly big it is. I mean, you may think it's a long way down the street to the chemist, but that's just peanuts to space.' Douglas Adams, Hitch-hiker's Guide to the Galaxy We human beings have trouble with infinity - yet infinity is a surprisingly human subject. Philosophers and mathematicians have gone mad contemplating its nature and complexity - yet it is a concept routinely used by schoolchildren. Exploring the infinite is a journey into paradox. Here is a quantity that turns arithmetic on its head, making it feasible that 1 = 0. Here is a concept that enables us to cram as many extra guests as we like into an already full hotel. Most bizarrely of all, it is quite easy to show that there must be something bigger than infinity - when it surely should be the biggest thing that could possibly be. Brian Clegg takes us on a fascinating tour of that borderland between the extremely large and the ultimate that takes us from Archimedes, counting the grains of sand that would fill the universe, to the latest theories on the physical reality of the infinite. Full of unexpected delights, whether St Augustine contemplating the nature of creation, Newton and Leibniz battling over ownership of calculus, or Cantor struggling to publicise his vision of the transfinite, infinity's fascination is in the way it brings together the everyday and the extraordinary, prosaic daily life and the esoteric. Whether your interest in infinity is mathematical, philosophical, spiritual or just plain curious, this accessible book offers a stimulating and entertaining read.
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The Power and Poetry of Mathematics

Author: Michael Guillen

Publisher: Hachette Books

ISBN: 1401304915

Category: Mathematics

Page: 288

View: 356

A Publishers Weekly best book of 1995! Dr. Michael Guillen, known to millions as the science editor of ABC's Good Morning America, tells the fascinating stories behind five mathematical equations. As a regular contributor to daytime's most popular morning news show and an instructor at Harvard University, Dr. Michael Guillen has earned the respect of millions as a clear and entertaining guide to the exhilarating world of science and mathematics. Now Dr. Guillen unravels the equations that have led to the inventions and events that characterize the modern world, one of which -- Albert Einstein's famous energy equation, E=mc2 -- enabled the creation of the nuclear bomb. Also revealed are the mathematical foundations for the moon landing, airplane travel, the electric generator -- and even life itself. Praised by Publishers Weekly as "a wholly accessible, beautifully written exploration of the potent mathematical imagination," and named a Best Nonfiction Book of 1995, the stories behind The Five Equations That Changed the World, as told by Dr. Guillen, are not only chronicles of science, but also gripping dramas of jealousy, fame, war, and discovery.
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The Story of Paul Erdös and the Search for Mathematical Truth

Author: Paul Hoffman

Publisher: Fourth Estate (GB)

ISBN: 9781857028294

Category: Mathematicians

Page: 301

View: 4999

The biography of a mathematical genius. Paul Erdos was the most prolific pure mathematician in history and, arguably, the strangest too. 'A mathematical genius of the first order, Paul Erdos was totally obsessed with his subject -- he thought and wrote mathematics for nineteen hours a day until he died. He travelled constantly, living out of a plastic bag and had no interest in food, sex, companionship, art -- all that is usually indispensible to a human life. Paul Hoffman, in this marvellous biography, gives us a vivid and strangely moving portrait of this singular creature, one that brings out not only Erdos's genius and his oddness, but his warmth and sense of fun, the joyfulness of his strange life.' Oliver Sacks For six decades Erdos had no job, no hobbies, no wife, no home; he never learnt to cook, do laundry, drive a car and died a virgin. Instead he travelled the world with his mother in tow, arriving at the doorstep of esteemed mathematicians declaring 'My brain is open'. He travelled until his death at 83, racing across four continents to prove as many theorems as possible, fuelled by a diet of espresso and amphetamines. With more than 1,500 papers written or co-written,
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A Mathematical Odyssey through Everyday Life

Author: Marcus du Sautoy

Publisher: St. Martin's Press

ISBN: 9780230120280

Category: Mathematics

Page: 272

View: 4929

Every time we download music, take a flight across the Atlantic or talk on our cell phones, we are relying on great mathematical inventions. In The Number Mysteries, one of our generation's foremost mathematicians Marcus du Sautoy offers a playful and accessible examination of numbers and how, despite efforts of the greatest minds, the most fundamental puzzles of nature remain unsolved. Du Sautoy tells about the quest to predict the future—from the flight of asteroids to an impending storm, from bending a ball like Beckham to forecasting population growth. He brings to life the beauty behind five mathematical puzzles that have contributed to our understanding of the world around us and have helped develop the technology to cope with it. With loads of games to play and puzzles to solve, this is a math book for everyone.
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The New Mathematics of Chaos

Author: Ian Stewart

Publisher: Wiley-Blackwell

ISBN: 9780631232513

Category: Science

Page: 416

View: 1634

The revised and updated edition includes three completely new chapters on the prediction and control of chaotic systems. It also incorporates new information regarding the solar system and an account of complexity theory. This witty, lucid and engaging book makes the complex mathematics of chaos accessible and entertaining. Presents complex mathematics in an accessible style. Includes three new chapters on prediction in chaotic systems, control of chaotic systems, and on the concept of chaos. Provides a discussion of complexity theory.
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Philosophy and the Labyrinths of the Mind

Author: Roy Sorensen

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780199728572

Category: Philosophy

Page: 416

View: 1294

Can God create a stone too heavy for him to lift? Can time have a beginning? Which came first, the chicken or the egg? Riddles, paradoxes, conundrums--for millennia the human mind has found such knotty logical problems both perplexing and irresistible. Now Roy Sorensen offers the first narrative history of paradoxes, a fascinating and eye-opening account that extends from the ancient Greeks, through the Middle Ages, the Enlightenment, and into the twentieth century. When Augustine asked what God was doing before He made the world, he was told: "Preparing hell for people who ask questions like that." A Brief History of the Paradox takes a close look at "questions like that" and the philosophers who have asked them, beginning with the folk riddles that inspired Anaximander to erect the first metaphysical system and ending with such thinkers as Lewis Carroll, Ludwig Wittgenstein, and W.V. Quine. Organized chronologically, the book is divided into twenty-four chapters, each of which pairs a philosopher with a major paradox, allowing for extended consideration and putting a human face on the strategies that have been taken toward these puzzles. Readers get to follow the minds of Zeno, Socrates, Aquinas, Ockham, Pascal, Kant, Hegel, and many other major philosophers deep inside the tangles of paradox, looking for, and sometimes finding, a way out. Filled with illuminating anecdotes and vividly written, A Brief History of the Paradox will appeal to anyone who finds trying to answer unanswerable questions a paradoxically pleasant endeavor.
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