The World of Ancient Persia

Author: John Curtis,Nigel Tallis

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN: 0520247310

Category: Art

Page: 272

View: 2801

A richly-illustrated and important book that traces the rise and fall of one of the ancient world's largest and richest empires.
Read More

the world of ancient Persia

Author: John Curtis

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Architecture

Page: 272

View: 3367

"This catalogue provides a unique insight into the wealth and splendour of Persian society - its magnificent palaces, exquisite craftsmanship and sophisticated administration. As the palace was central to imperial life, the objects illustrated are grouped in themes within a palatial context, the remains from the royal sites of Susa and Persepolis providing the major focus. Included are sections on gold jewellery, luxury tableware, religious and burial customs, and transport and commerce. Also discussed is the expansion of the Persian Empire, including the Graeco-Persian Wars, and the rediscovery of Ancient Persia."--BOOK JACKET.
Read More

Ancient Persia at War

Author: Kaveh Farrokh,Richard Nelson Frye

Publisher: Osprey Publishing

ISBN: 9781846034732

Category: History

Page: 320

View: 1108

The empires of ancient Persia remain as mysterious today as they were to contemporary Western scholars. Although Alexander the Great's conquest of Persia is legendary, the military successes of the Achaemenid, Parthian, and Sassanian empires, along with their revolutionary military technology, tactics, and culture have been almost forgotten in the sands of the East. Containing information never before published in English, Shadows in the Desert offers a comprehensive history of Persia's wars with East and West which spanned over a millennium, and offers an insight into the exchange of ideas and culture that occurred during these clashes between East and West, not only military technology, but influences in the arts, medicine, religion and science. This beautifully illustrated book delves into the rich heritage of the Persians, which was spread around the world through war and conquest, and which, after the fall of the Sassanians, continued to impact upon civilizations around the world.
Read More

Author: Lloyd Llewellyn-Jones

Publisher: Edinburgh University Press

ISBN: 0748677119

Category: History

Page: 272

View: 6584

This book explores the representation of Persian monarchy and the court of the Achaemenid Great Kings from the point of view of the ancient Iranians themselves and through the sometimes distorted prism of Classical authors.
Read More

Author: John Curtis

Publisher: British Museum Publications Limited

ISBN: 9780714150796

Category: History

Page: 64

View: 767

In May 1880 Captain F.C. Burton, a British political officer in Afghanistan, rescued a group of merchants who had been captured by bandits while travelling between Kabul and Peshawar. With them was a rich and impressive collection of gold and silver objects dating back to the fifth and fourth centuries BC. From the banks of the River Oxus, the entire hoard was, in due course, bequeathed to the British Museum. Consisting of around 170 objects, including vessels, a gold scabbard, armlets, coins and much more, the collection is an example of ancient goldsmithery at its very best. With exciting and descriptive insight placing the treasure into historical and cultural context, this book takes a closer look at the individual wonders that make up the Oxus Treasure one of the British Museums most celebrated and cherished collections.
Read More

A New Beginning for the Middle East

Author: John Curtis,Neil MacGregor,Irving L. Finkel

Publisher: British Museum Publications Limited

ISBN: 9780714111872

Category: History

Page: 144

View: 4501

The Cyrus Cylinder is one of the most famous objects to have survived from the ancient world. The Cylinder was inscribed in Babylonian cuneiform on the orders of the Persian King Cyrus the Great (559−530BC) after he captured Babylon in 539BC. It is often referred to as the first bill of human rights as it appears to permit freedom of worship throughout the Persian Empire and to allow deported people to return to their homelands. It is valued by people all around the world as a symbol of tolerance and respect for different peoples and different faiths, so much so that a copy of the cylinder is on display in the United Nations building in New York.This catalogue is being published in conjunction with the first ever tour of the object to the United States, along with sixteen other objects from the British Museum's collection. The book discusses how these objects demonstrate the innovations initiated by Persian rule in the Ancient Near East (550 BC−331 BC), a prime example being a gold plaque from the Oxus Treasure with the representation of a priest that shows the spread of the Zoroastrian religion. The book offers a new authoritative translation of the Cyrus Cylinder by Irving Finkel and the publication of two fragments of a cuneiform tablet that show how the Cyrus Cylinder was most probably a proclamation and not just a foundation deposit.
Read More

Neighbours and Rivals

Author: Beate Dignas,Engelbert Winter

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 052184925X

Category: History

Page: 347

View: 8921

A narrative history, with sourcebook, of the turbulent relations between Rome and the Sasanian Empire.
Read More

Author: Pierre Briant

Publisher: Harvard University Press

ISBN: 0674493095

Category: History

Page: 579

View: 2170

Darius III ruled over the Persian Empire and was the most powerful king of his time, yet he remains obscure. In the first book devoted to the historical memory of Darius III, Pierre Briant describes a man depicted in ancient sources as a decadent Oriental who lacked Western masculine virtues and was in every way the opposite of Alexander the Great.
Read More

Ancient Persia and the Archaeology of Empires

Author: Lori Khatchadourian

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN: 0520290526

Category: Social Science

Page: 288

View: 4335

A free ebook version of this title is available through Luminos, University of California Press’s new open access publishing program. Visit www.luminosoa.org to learn more. What is the role of the material world in shaping the tensions and paradoxes of imperial sovereignty? Scholars have long shed light on the complex processes of conquest, extraction, and colonialism under imperial rule. But imperialism has usually been cast as an exclusively human drama, one in which the world of matter does not play an active role. Lori Khatchadourian argues instead that things—from everyday objects to monumental buildings—profoundly shape social and political life under empire. Out of the archaeology of ancient Persia and the South Caucasus, Imperial Matter advances powerful new analytical approaches to the study of imperialism writ large and should be read by scholars working on empire across the humanities and social sciences.
Read More

History, Art and Society in Iran and the Ancient Near East

Author: John Curtis,St John Simpson

Publisher: I.B.Tauris

ISBN: 0857718010

Category: History

Page: 648

View: 2840

Interest and fascination in Achaemenid Persia has burgeoned in recent years. It is time for a major new appraisal of the glorious civilization founded by Cyrus the Great and continued by his successors, the Great Kings Darius I, Xerxes and Artaxerxes I. This volume offers precisely that: a sustained and comprehensive overview of the field of Achaemenid studies by leading scholars and experts. It discusses all aspects of Achaemenid history and archaeology between 550 BCE and 330 BCE, and embraces the whole vast territory of the Persian Empire from North Africa to India and from Central Asia to the Persian Gulf. Topics covered include aspects of Achaemenid religion, administration, material culture, ethnicity, gender and the survival of Achaemenid traditions. The publication of the book is an event: it represents a watershed not only in better appreciation and understanding of the rich and complex cultural heritage established by Cyrus, but also of the lasting significance of the Achaemenid kings and the impact that their remarkable civilization has had on wider Persian and Middle Eastern history._x000D_ _x000D_ ‘A major guide to and an explanation of thewhole phenomenon of the Persian Empire, from the acknowledged experts.’ - Sir John Boardman, FBA,Lincoln Professor Emeritus of Classical Art and Archaeology,University of Oxford_x000D_
Read More

Author: Josef Wiesehofer

Publisher: I.B.Tauris

ISBN: 9781860646751

Category: History

Page: 332

View: 4583

Of all the great civilizations of the ancient world, that of Persia is one of the least understood. Josef Wiesehöfer's comprehensive survey of the Persian Empire under the Achaeminids, the Parthians, and the Sasanians focuses on the primary Persian sources--written, archaeological, and numismatic. He avoids the traditional Western approach which has tended to rely heavily on inaccurate Greek and Roman accounts. Part of the freshness of this book comes from its Near Eastern perspective.
Read More

A Corpus of Sources from the Achaemenid Period

Author: A. Kuhrt

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 113601702X

Category: History

Page: 496

View: 4379

Bringing together a wide variety of material in many different languages that exists from the substantial body of work left by this large empire, The Persian Empire presents annotated translations, together with introductions to the problems of using it in order to gain an understanding of the history and working os this remarkable political entity. The Achaemenid empire developed in the region of modern Fars (Islam) and expanded to unite territories stretching from the Segean and Egypt in the west to Central Asia and north-west India, which it ruled for over 200 years until its conquest by Alexander of Macedon. Although all these regions had long since been in contact with each other, they had never been linked under a single regime. The Persian empire represents an important phase of transformation for its subjects, such as the Jews, as well as those living on its edges, such as the European Greeks.
Read More

The History and Legacy of the Ancient Persian Empire's Capital City

Author: Charles River Charles River Editors

Publisher: Createspace Independent Publishing Platform

ISBN: 9781984013101

Category:

Page: 88

View: 921

*Includes pictures *Includes ancient historians' descriptions of Persepolis and the Persians *Includes online resources and a bibliography for further reading "By the favor of Ahuramazda these are the countries which I got into my possession along with this Persian people, which felt fear of me and bore me tribute: Elam, Media, Babylonia, Arabia, Assyria, Egypt, Armenia, Cappadocia, Lydia, the Greeks who are of the mainland and those who are by the sea, and countries which are across the sea, Sagartia, Parthia, Drangiana, Aria, Bactria, Sogdia, Chorasmia, Sattagydia, Arachosia, Hindus, Gandara, Sacae, Maka." - An inscription on a terrace wall in Persepolis, circa 521 CE Lying in the middle of a plain in modern day Iran is a forgotten ancient city: Persepolis. Built two and a half thousand years ago, it was known in its day as the richest city under the sun. Persepolis was the capital of Persia, the largest empire the world had ever seen, but after its destruction, it was largely forgotten for nearly 2,000 years, and the lives and achievements of those who built it were almost entirely erased from history. Alexander the Great's troops razed the city to the ground in a drunken riot to celebrate the conquest of the capital, after which time and sand buried it for centuries. It was not until the excavations of the 1930s that many of the relics, reliefs, and clay tablets that offer so much information about Persian life could be studied for the first time. Through archaeological remains, ancient texts, and work by a new generation of historians, a picture can today be built of this remarkable civilization and their capital city. Although the city had been destroyed, the legacy of the Persians survived, even as they mostly remain an enigma to the West and are not nearly as well understood as the Greeks, Romans, or Egyptians. In a sense, Persepolis and the Persian Empire are some of the most enduring mysteries of ancient civilization. Persepolis: The History and Legacy of the Ancient Persian Empire's Capital City looks at how the Persian city was built, its importance, and its collapse. Along with pictures depicting important people, places, and events, you will learn about Persepolis like never before.
Read More

The Great Royal Residence of Achaemenid Persia

Author: Jean Perrot

Publisher: I.B.Tauris

ISBN: 1848856210

Category: Architecture

Page: 507

View: 5246

The palace complex of the Persian King Darius I, the Great (552-486 BCE), provides unique evidence of the sophistication of Achaemenid architecture and construction. The discover and excavation of the palace, which this book records, thus casts a new light on the beginnings of the Achaemenid period.
Read More

An Archaeological Investigation of the Genesis of Achaemenid Art

Author: John Boardman

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9780500051023

Category: Art

Page: 255

View: 7209

The first kings of the Achaemenid Persian empire, Cyrus the Great and Darius,sought to devise for their capital cities new styles in monumental architecture and sculpture to express their imperial status and mastery of the known world. With no local tradition to guide designers, a homogeneous style was created from the example of the many new subjects - Ionian Greeks, Lydians, Mesopotamians, and Egyptians. This book traces these sources and explores the way that traditional Achaemenid motifs, if not styles, also permeated the empire. The Achaemenid Persian experiment was unique in antiquity, and it was successful for as long as the empire lasted. Even after Alexander the Great brought about its downfall, it continued to influence the arts from Greece to India. This is a record of the brilliant flowering of an artificial yet unified construct, unmatched in the art of the Old World.
Read More

Author: Albert T. Olmstead,Albert Ten Eyck Olmstead,Arthur T. Olmstead

Publisher: Phoenix Books

ISBN: 9780226627779

Category: History

Page: 568

View: 2110

Traces the achievements of the Iranian empire through two centuries of glory to its downfall in the third century B.C
Read More

The Great Persian Edict from Babylon

Author: Irving Finkel

Publisher: I.B.Tauris

ISBN: 0857733494

Category: History

Page: 160

View: 1455

Some historical artefacts are destined forever to alter how the ancient world is perceived. The unearthing in today’s Iraq (in 1879) of a clay cylinder-shaped decree from Cyrus the Great, founder of the Achaemenid dynasty of Persia, stands in the same tradition of game-changing discoveries from antiquity as Hammurabi’s famous law code or the intact tomb of the boy-king Tutankhamun. For the Cyrus Cylinder contains in microcosm the whole history of its period. Inscribed with an account of the conquest of Babylon in 539 BCE by the Persian King, it records an event which launched one of the greatest imperial adventures in history. It describes Cyrus’ capture and deposition of Nabonidus, last native Babylonian ruler (represented by the Cylinder text as an oppressor of his own people) and proclaims the Persian as a liberator. His annexation of Babylon was to become the platform upon which the Achaemenid military machine built its later vast imperium. But the Cylinder is more than an ancient exercise in propaganda. It has also been called the world’s first declaration of human rights, setting out the decree by which Cyrus freed the Jews from captivity in Babylon. This important volume is the first to discuss the Cylinder and its remarkable history.
Read More

A Concise History of the Achaemenid Empire, 550–330 BCE

Author: Matt Waters

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1107652723

Category: History

Page: 272

View: 6999

The Achaemenid Persian Empire, at its greatest territorial extent under Darius I (r.522–486 BCE), held sway over territory stretching from the Indus River Valley to southeastern Europe and from the western Himalayas to northeast Africa. In this book, Matt Waters gives a detailed historical overview of the Achaemenid period while considering the manifold interpretive problems historians face in constructing and understanding its history. This book offers a Persian perspective even when relying on Greek textual sources and archaeological evidence. Waters situates the story of the Achaemenid Persians in the context of their predecessors in the mid-first millennium BCE and through their successors after the Macedonian conquest, constructing a compelling narrative of how the empire retained its vitality for more than two hundred years (c.550–330 BCE) and left a massive imprint on Middle Eastern as well as Greek and European history.
Read More