Author: Fred Herzog,Felix Hoffmann

Publisher: Hatje Cantz Verlag

ISBN: 9783775728119

Category: Photography

Page: 191

View: 9495

After immigrating to Canada in the fifties, Fred Herzog (b.1930 in Bad Friedrichshall, Germany) devoted himself to what at the time was an unusual medium: color photography. In doing so, he breached entrenched visual habits and doctrines, which primarily assigned the status of art to black-and-white photography. As a pioneer in the field of color photography, Herzog perfected his eye for the supposedly insignificant. His motifs are the streets of Vancouver, supermarkets, gas stations, bars, urban scenes, landscapes, and, again and again, the people in his environment - the heights and depths of the North American dream. He tested the potential of color photography as a medium for great objectivity and great artistry alike, and his critical gaze shows us the trivial, the ephemeral, and the apparently meaningless. Above all, however, color lends his photographs a unique atmosphere and force, and is ultimately what lends them such authenticity.
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Street Photographer

Author: John Maloof

Publisher: powerHouse Books

ISBN: 1576876330

Category: Photography

Page: 136

View: 6748

Please note that all blank pages in the book were chosen as part of the design by the publisher. A good street photographer must be possessed of many talents: an eye for detail, light, and composition; impeccable timing; a populist or humanitarian outlook; and a tireless ability to constantly shoot, shoot, shoot, shoot and never miss a moment. It is hard enough to find these qualities in trained photographers with the benefit of schooling and mentors and a community of fellow artists and aficionados supporting and rewarding their efforts. It is incredibly rare to find it in someone with no formal training and no network of peers. Yet Vivian Maier is all of these things, a professional nanny, who from the 1950s until the 1990s took over 100,000 photographs worldwide—from France to New York City to Chicago and dozens of other countries—and yet showed the results to no one. The photos are amazing both for the breadth of the work and for the high quality of the humorous, moving, beautiful, and raw images of all facets of city life in America’s post-war golden age. It wasn’t until local historian John Maloof purchased a box of Maier’s negatives from a Chicago auction house and began collecting and championing her marvelous work just a few years ago that any of it saw the light of day. Presented here for the first time in print, Vivian Maier: Street Photographer collects the best of her incredible, unseen body of work.
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Author: Phillip Prodger

Publisher: Yale University Press

ISBN: 0300222521

Category: Photography

Page: 184

View: 3428

"So many people take those simple snapshots of life, but there's something about Eggleston that no one can match." --Sofia Coppola The eminent American photographer William Eggleston (b. 1939) was a pioneer in exploring the artistic potential of color photography. Eggleston made a name for himself with his eccentric, unexpected compositions of everyday life that were nonetheless rife with implied narrative, elevating the commonplace to art. This sumptuously illustrated book features Eggleston's masterful portraits, including many familiar and beloved images as well as some previously unseen photographs from his long and productive career. Many of Eggleston's poetic photographs portray life in his home state of Tennessee, and the people he encountered there. Eggleston frequented the 1970s Memphis club scene, where he met, befriended, and photographed musicians such as fellow Southerners Alex Chilton and Ike Turner. He also photographed celebrities including Dennis Hopper, Walter Hopps, and Eudora Welty, and became a fixture of Andy Warhol's Factory scene, dating the Warhol protégé Viva. Over the past half century, he has created a powerful and enduring body of work featuring friends and family, musicians, artists, and strangers. In addition to the lavish reproductions of Eggleston's portraits, this volume includes an essay and chronology, plus an interview with Eggleston and his close family members that gives new insights into his images and artistic process.
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Making a Life and a Living in Photography

Author: David duChemin

Publisher: New Riders

ISBN: 9780321702876

Category: Photography

Page: 272

View: 655

For those who want to make the transition into the world of vocational photography—staying true to your craft and vision, while fusing that craft with commerce VisionMongers is a great place to begin your journey. With a voice equally realistic and encouraging, photographer David duChemin discusses the experiences he’s had, the lessons he’s learned, and the practices he’s adopted in his own winding journey to becoming a successful working photographer. When it comes to this personal, honest combination of craft and commerce, there is no single path to success. Everyone’s goals are different, as is everyone’s definition of success. As such, VisionMongers does not prescribe a one size-fits-all program. Instead, duChemin candidly shares ideas, wisdom, and inspiration to introduce you to, and help you navigate, the many aspects of transforming your passion into your vocation. He addresses everything from the anxiety-riddled question “Am I good enough?” to the basics—and beyond—of marketing, business, and finance, as well as the core assumption that your product is great and your craft is always improving. Along the way, duChemin features the stories of nine other photographers—including Chase Jarvis, Gavin Gough, and Zack Arias—whose paths, while unique, have all shared a commitment and passion for bringing their own vision to market. With VisionMongers, you’ll learn what paths have been taken—what has worked for these photographers—and you’ll be equipped to begin the process of forging your own.
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Charles Cushman's Photographic Journey Through a Vanishing America

Author: Eric Sandweiss

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0199773092

Category: Art

Page: 240

View: 1182

Charles Cushman (1896-1972) photographed a disappearing world in living color. Cushman's midcentury America--a place normally seen only through a scrim of gray--reveals itself as a place as vivid and real as the view through our window. The Day in Its Color introduces readers to Cushman's extraordinary work, a recently unearthed archive of photographs that is the largest known body of early color photographs by a single photographer, 14,500 in all, most shot on vivid, color-saturated Kodachrome stock. From 1938-1969, Cushman--a sometime businessman and amateur photographer with an uncanny eye for everyday detail--travelled constantly, shooting everything he encountered as he ventured from New York to New Orleans, Chicago to San Francisco, and everywhere in between. His photos include portraits, ethnographic studies, agricultural and industrial landscapes, movie sets and media events, children playing, laborers working, and thousands of street scenes, all precisely documented in time and place. The result is a chronicle of an era almost never seen, or even envisioned, in color. This well-preserved collection is all the more remarkable for having gone undiscovered for decades. What makes the photos most valuable, however, is the wide range of subjects, landscapes, and moods it captures--snapshots of a lost America as yet untouched by a homogenizing overlay of interstate highways, urban renewal, chain stores, and suburban development--a world of hand-painted signs, state fairs, ramshackle shops, small town living and bustling urban scenes. The book also reveals the fascinating and startling life story of the man who stood, unseen, on the other side of the lens, surely one of America's most impressive amateur photographers and outsider artists. With over 150 gorgeous color prints, The Day in Its Color gives us one of the most evocative visual histories of mid-20th century America that we have.
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Author: David Attwell,Derek Attridge

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1316175138

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: N.A

View: 2316

South Africa's unique history has produced literatures in many languages, in both oral and written forms, reflecting the diversity in the cultural histories and experiences of its people. The Cambridge History offers a comprehensive, multi-authored history of South African literature in all eleven official languages (and more minor ones) of the country, produced by a team of over forty international experts, including contributors from all of the major regions and language groups of South Africa. It will provide a complete portrait of South Africa's literary production, organised as a chronological history from the oral traditions existing before colonial settlement, to the post-apartheid revision of the past. In a field marked by controversy, this volume is more fully representative than any existing account of South Africa's literary history. It will make a unique contribution to Commonwealth, international and postcolonial studies and serve as a definitive reference work for decades to come.
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Author: Sarah Greenough,Harry M. Callahan,National Gallery of Art (U.S.)

Publisher: Bulfinch Press

ISBN: 9780821227275

Category: Photography

Page: 199

View: 8556

A compilation of Harry Callahan's photographs throughout hs career ranges from 1912 to 1999 and reveals how he used double exposures, color, extreme contrast, and wide-angle photography to creat lyrical, highly personal images. Original. 10,000 first printing.
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Author: Barry Broadfoot,Rudy Kovach,Fred Herzog

Publisher: J.J. Douglas

ISBN: N.A

Category: History

Page: 182

View: 4920

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Life in Color

Author: Martine D'Astier,Martine Ravache

Publisher: ABRAMS

ISBN: 9781419720918

Category: Photography

Page: 168

View: 470

Jacques Henri Lartigue (1894-1986) was the best-known "amateur" in the history of photography, famously discovered by the art world and given an exhibi­tion at MoMA in New York when he was in his late sixties. He began by recording the pastimes and customs of his wealthy Parisian milieu, indulging his fascination with sports and aviation, and throughout his long life he was never without his camera. His friendships extended to the superstars of French culture, but he also made thousands of photographs of his family, wives, and lovers. His work was irresistibly warm and engaging. Although known for his black-and-white work, Lartigue loved color film, experimenting with the Autochrome process in the teens and twenties and embracing Ektachrome in the late 1940s. His color work, reproduced here for the first time, is astonishingly fresh: the French countryside, the women in his life, famous friends (Picasso, Fellini), and glimpses from his travels all come alive in this delightful book.
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Douglas Coupland's Vancouver

Author: Douglas Coupland

Publisher: Douglas & McIntyre Limited

ISBN: 9781553653592

Category: History

Page: 175

View: 2900

This irresistible little book offers a very different take on Vancouver, one of the world's most beautiful cities. Douglas Coupland applies his unique sensibility to everything from the Grouse Grind to glass towers, First Nations to feng shui, Kitsilano to Cantonese. Cleverly designed to mimic an underground Japanese magazine, this edition is fully updated and revised with riffs on Vancouver as a neon city, a land of treehuggers, and more.
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The Complete Works

Author: Stephen Shore,Stephan Schmidt-Wulffen

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9781597113038

Category: Photography

Page: 208

View: 3865

Originally published in 1982, Stephen Shore's legendary "Uncommon Places" has influenced more than a generation of photographers. Shore was among the first artists to take color beyond the domain of advertising and fashion photography, and his large-format color work on the American vernacular landscape inaugurated a vital photographic tradition. "Uncommon Places: The Complete Works," published by Aperture in 2005, presented a definitive collection of the landmark series, and in the span of a decade has become a contemporary classic. Now, for this lushly produced reissue, the artist has added nearly 20 rediscovered images and a statement explaining what it means to expand a classic series. Like Robert Frank and Walker Evans before him, Shore discovered a hitherto unarticulated vision of America via highway and camera. Approaching his subjects with cool objectivity, Shore retains precise systems of gestures in composition and light through which a hotel bedroom or a building on a side street assumes both an archetypal aura and an ambiguously personal importance. An essay by critic and curator Stephan Schmidt-Wulffen and a conversation with Shore by writer Lynne Tillman examine his methodology and elucidate his roots in Pop and Conceptual art. The texts are illustrated with reproductions from Shore's earlier series "American Surfaces" and "Amarillo: Tall in Texas." At age 14 Stephen Shore (born 1947) had his work purchased by Edward Steichen for The Museum of Modern Art, New York. At 17 Shore was a regular at Andy Warhol's Factory, producing an important photographic document of the scene, and in 1971 at the age of 23 he became the first living photographer since Alfred Stieglitz 40 years earlier to have a one-man show at the Met. He has had numerous one-man shows, among others at The Museum of Modern Art, New York; George Eastman House, Rochester; Hammer Museum, Los Angeles; and The Art Institute of Chicago. Since 1982 he has been Director of the Photography Program at Bard College, Annandale-on-Hudson, New York.
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Thirty Years of Photographs by Alex Webb

Author: Alex Webb,Geoff Dyer

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9781597111737

Category: Photography

Page: 203

View: 8829

Gathering some of Alex Webbs most iconic images, many of which were taken in the far corners of the earth, "The Suffering of Light" brings a fresh perspective to his extensive catalogue. Recognized as a pioneer of American colour photography, Webb has since the 1970s consistently created photographs characterized by intense colour and light. His work, with its richly layered and complex composition, touches on multiple genres, including street photography, photojournalism and fine art, but as Webb claims, to me it all is photography. You have to go out and explore the world with a camera. Webbs ability to distil gesture, colour and contrasting cultural tensions into single, beguiling frames results in evocative images that convey a sense of enigma, irony and humour. Featuring key works alongside previously unpublished photographs, This is Webbs first comprehensive monograph and provides the most thorough examination to date of this modern masters prolific, thirty-year career.
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Author: Francois Hebel

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9780500544488

Category: Photography

Page: 144

View: 6291

The first retrospective of the pioneering work of Harry Gruyaert
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Shooting the Sun/Splitting the Pie

Author: Grant Arnold,Monika Szewczyk,John Drury

Publisher: Black Dog Pub Limited

ISBN: 9781910433430

Category: Art

Page: 160

View: 494

Jerry Pethick: Shooting the Sun/Splitting the Pie is the first major volume dedicated to the career of this multifaceted artist. Pethick's practice has always been difficult to categorize; though his work focused on questions of perception, which have been a central focus in the visual arts over the past four decades, his amalgamations of photography, optical devices, sculpture and drawing?as well as the structures he assembled to create new conceptions of material space?look like no other artist's work. His oeuvre has always evoked something of the amateur scientist and inventor. In the late 1960s and early 70s he became widely known for his pioneering work with holography in London and San Francisco. While he stopped working with holograms when he moved to Hornby Island, British Columbia in the mid-1970s, the nature of visual perception, the history of optics and integral (or fly's eye) photography using multiple lenses remained central to his work. Although Pethick drew upon a sophisticated in-depth understanding of science and art history, his work was constructed from modest materials and found objects, including cheap plastic Fresnel lenses, discarded sinks, hay bales, light bulbs and bicycle tires that could be found in a local hardware store or garbage dump. While Pethick's work has been included in exhibitions across Canada, Europe, the United States and Japan, this publication will accompany the first retrospective exhibition of his work. In partnership with the Vancouver Art Gallery.
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A Lifetime Retrospective

Author: Colin Westerbeck

Publisher: Laurence King Publishing

ISBN: 9781786271860

Category: Photography

Page: 220

View: 3608

Where I Find Myself is the first major single book retrospective of one of America's leading photographers. It is organized in inverse chronological order and spans the photographer's whole career to date: from Joel Meyerowitz's most recent picture all the way back to the first photograph he ever took. The book covers all of Joel Meyerowitz's great projects: his work inspired by the artist Morandi, his work on trees, his exclusive coverage of Ground Zero, his trips in the footsteps of Robert Frank across the US, his experiments comparing color and black and white pictures, and of course his iconic street photography work. Joel Meyerovitz is incredibly eloquent and candid about how photography works or doesn't, and this should be an inspiration to anyone interested in photography.
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Author: Geoff Dyer

Publisher: University of Texas Press

ISBN: 9781477310335

Category: Photography

Page: 240

View: 8063

Garry Winogrand—along with Diane Arbus and Lee Friedlander—was one of the most important photographers of the 1960s and 1970s, as well as one of the world’s foremost street photographers. Award-winning writer Geoff Dyer has admired Winogrand’s work for many years. Modeled on John Szarkowski’s classic book Atget, The Street Philosophy of Garry Winogrand is a masterfully curated selection of one hundred photographs from the Winogrand archive at the Center for Creative Photography, with each image accompanied by an original essay. Dyer takes the viewer/reader on a wildly original journey through both iconic and unseen images from the archive, including eighteen previously unpublished color photographs. The book encompasses most of Winogrand’s themes and subjects and remains broadly faithful to the chronological and geographical facts of his life, but Dyer’s responses to the photographs are unorthodox, eye-opening, and often hilarious. This inimitable combination of photographer and writer, images and text, itself offers what Dyer claims for Winogrand’s photography—an education in seeing.
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