Author: Johnny D. Boggs

Publisher: Taylor Trade Publishing

ISBN: 146162567X

Category: History

Page: 250

View: 2456

Not every Wild West disagreement was settled with guns on a dusty street. Even on the frontier, accused criminals were entitled to a fair trial. Author Johnny Boggs recreates and analyzes some of the wildest murder trials of these times.
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Notorious Killings & Celebrated Trials

Author: Bill Neal

Publisher: Texas Tech University Press

ISBN: 9780896725799

Category: History

Page: 308

View: 5336

"Longtime Texas prosecutor and defense attorney mines trial records and other primary sources to analyze murder trials from 1880 through WWI in West Texas and Oklahoma. Addresses not only legal and illegal ploys but also inherent pitfalls for a nascent cr
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Author: Johnny D. Boggs

Publisher: McFarland

ISBN: 0786465557

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 292

View: 658

A comprehensive filmography, this book is composed of lengthy entries on about 75 films depicting legendary New Mexico outlaw Billy the Kid--from the lost Billy the Kid (1911) to the blockbuster Young Guns (1988) to the direct-to-video 1313: Billy the Kid(2012) and everything in between. Each entry gives a synopsis, cast and credits, critical reception, and a discussion of the events of the films compared to the historical record. Among the entries are made-for-TV and direct-to-video films, foreign movies, and continuing television series in which Billy the Kid made an appearance.
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Sex, Murder, and Insanity in the Victorian West

Author: Carole Haber

Publisher: UNC Press Books

ISBN: 146960759X

Category: History

Page: 328

View: 7090

On November 3, 1870, on a San Francisco ferry, Laura Fair shot a bullet into the heart of her married lover, A. P. Crittenden. Throughout her two murder trials, Fair's lawyers, supported by expert testimony from physicians, claimed that the shooting was the result of temporary insanity caused by a severely painful menstrual cycle. The first jury disregarded such testimony, choosing instead to focus on Fair's disreputable character. In the second trial, however, an effective defense built on contemporary medical beliefs and gendered stereotypes led to a verdict that shocked Americans across the country. In this rousing history, Carole Haber probes changing ideas about morality and immorality, masculinity and femininity, love and marriage, health and disease, and mental illness to show that all these concepts were reinvented in the Victorian West. Haber's book examines the era's most controversial issues, including suffrage, the gendered courts, women's physiology, and free love. This notorious story enriches our understanding of Victorian society, opening the door to a discussion about the ways in which reputation, especially female reputation, is shaped.
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A Murder in a Small Western Town Sets Off a Strugg

Author: J. Anthony Lukas

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN: 9781439128107

Category: History

Page: 880

View: 5008

Hailed as "toweringly important" (Baltimore Sun), "a work of scrupulous and significant reportage" (E. L. Doctorow), and "an unforgettable historical drama" (Chicago Sun-Times), Big Trouble brings to life the astonishing case that ultimately engaged President Theodore Roosevelt, Supreme Court justice Oliver Wendell Holmes, and the politics and passions of an entire nation at century's turn. After Idaho's former governor is blown up by a bomb at his garden gate at Christmastime 1905, America's most celebrated detective, Pinkerton James McParland, takes over the investigation. His daringly executed plan to kidnap the radical union leader "Big Bill" Haywood from Colorado to stand trial in Idaho sets the stage for a memorable courtroom confrontation between the flamboyant prosecutor, progressive senator William Borah, and the young defender of the dispossessed, Clarence Darrow. Big Trouble captures the tumultuous first decade of the twentieth century, when capital and labor, particularly in the raw, acquisitive West, were pitted against each other in something close to class war. Lukas paints a vivid portrait of a time and place in which actress Ethel Barrymore, baseball phenom Walter Johnson, and editor William Allen White jostled with railroad magnate E. H. Harriman, socialist Eugene V. Debs, gunslinger Charlie Siringo, and Operative 21, the intrepid Pinkerton agent who infiltrated Darrow's defense team. This is a grand narrative of the United States as it charged, full of hope and trepidation, into the twentieth century.
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A Novel

Author: Margaret Atwood

Publisher: Anchor

ISBN: 9780307797957

Category: Fiction

Page: 480

View: 7958

Now a 6-part Netflix original mini-series: in Alias Grace, the bestselling author of The Handmaid's Tale takes readers into the life of one of the most notorious women of the nineteenth century. It's 1843, and Grace Marks has been convicted for her involvement in the vicious murders of her employer and his housekeeper and mistress. Some believe Grace is innocent; others think her evil or insane. Now serving a life sentence, Grace claims to have no memory of the murders. An up-and-coming expert in the burgeoning field of mental illness is engaged by a group of reformers and spiritualists who seek a pardon for Grace. He listens to her story while bringing her closer and closer to the day she cannot remember. What will he find in attempting to unlock her memories? Captivating and disturbing, Alias Grace showcases bestselling, Booker Prize-winning author Margaret Atwood at the peak of her powers.
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A True Story of Twenty-two Years with a World-famous Detective Agency; Giving the Inside Facts of the Bloody Cœur D'Alene Labor Riots, and the Many Ups and Downs of the Author Throughout the United States, Alaska, British Columbia and Old Mexico, Also Exciting Scenes Among the Moonshiners of Kentucky and Virginia

Author: Charles A. Siringo

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Crime

Page: 515

View: 5803

Ask librarian for help in locating.
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A Murder Case Gone Wrong

Author: Raymond Bonner

Publisher: Vintage

ISBN: 0307948544

Category: Law

Page: 299

View: 5985

From Pulitzer Prize winner Raymond Bonner, the gripping story of a grievously mishandled murder case that put a twenty-three-year-old man on death row. In January 1982, an elderly white widow was found brutally murdered in the small town of Greenwood, South Carolina. Police immediately arrested Edward Lee Elmore, a semiliterate, mentally retarded black man with no previous felony record. His only connection to the victim was having cleaned her gutters and windows, but barely ninety days after the victim's body was found, he was tried, convicted, and sentenced to death. Elmore had been on death row for eleven years when a young attorney named Diana Holt first learned of his case. With the exemplary moral commitment and tenacious investigation that have distinguished his reporting career, Bonner follows Holt's battle to save Elmore's life and shows us how his case is a textbook example of what can go wrong in the American justice system. Moving, enraging, suspenseful, and enlightening, Anatomy of Injustice is a vital contribution to our nation's ongoing, increasingly important debate about inequality and the death penalty.
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Sex, Murder, and Insanity in the Victorian West

Author: Carole Haber

Publisher: UNC Press Books

ISBN: 1469607581

Category: History

Page: 310

View: 5460

Trials of Laura Fair: Sex, Murder, and Insanity in the Victorian West
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The Osage Murders and the Birth of the FBI

Author: David Grann

Publisher: Vintage

ISBN: 0385534256

Category: True Crime

Page: 352

View: 873

NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER - NATIONAL BOOK AWARD FINALIST "Disturbing and riveting...It will sear your soul." —Dave Eggers, New York Times Book Review SHELF AWARENESS'S BEST BOOK OF 2017 Named a best book of the year by Wall Street Journal, The Boston Globe, San Francisco Chronicle, GQ, Time, Newsday, Entertainment Weekly, Time Magazine, NPR's Maureen Corrigan, NPR's "On Point," Vogue, Smithsonian, Cosmopolitan, Seattle Times, Bloomberg, Lit Hub's "Ultimate Best Books," Library Journal, Paste, Kirkus, Slate.com and Book Browse From New Yorker staff writer David Grann, #1 New York Times best-selling author of The Lost City of Z, a twisting, haunting true-life murder mystery about one of the most monstrous crimes in American history In the 1920s, the richest people per capita in the world were members of the Osage Indian nation in Oklahoma. After oil was discovered beneath their land, they rode in chauffeured automobiles, built mansions, and sent their children to study in Europe. Then, one by one, the Osage began to be killed off. The family of an Osage woman, Mollie Burkhart, became a prime target. Her relatives were shot and poisoned. And it was just the beginning, as more and more members of the tribe began to die under mysterious circumstances. In this last remnant of the Wild West—where oilmen like J. P. Getty made their fortunes and where desperadoes like Al Spencer, the “Phantom Terror,” roamed—many of those who dared to investigate the killings were themselves murdered. As the death toll climbed to more than twenty-four, the FBI took up the case. It was one of the organization’s first major homicide investigations and the bureau badly bungled the case. In desperation, the young director, J. Edgar Hoover, turned to a former Texas Ranger named Tom White to unravel the mystery. White put together an undercover team, including one of the only American Indian agents in the bureau. The agents infiltrated the region, struggling to adopt the latest techniques of detection. Together with the Osage they began to expose one of the most chilling conspiracies in American history. In Killers of the Flower Moon, David Grann revisits a shocking series of crimes in which dozens of people were murdered in cold blood. Based on years of research and startling new evidence, the book is a masterpiece of narrative nonfiction, as each step in the investigation reveals a series of sinister secrets and reversals. But more than that, it is a searing indictment of the callousness and prejudice toward American Indians that allowed the murderers to operate with impunity for so long. Killers of the Flower Moon is utterly compelling, but also emotionally devastating.
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Chronicle of the Finch-Tregoff case

Author: F.A.C.E.P. Jones M.D.,Marie Anne Lidholm

Publisher: BookBaby

ISBN: 0963710214

Category: True Crime

Page: 322

View: 1459

On late evening in June of 1959 gunshots echoed through southills neighborhood of West Covina, California. Dr. R. Bernard Finch had murdered his wife, Barbara Jean. His accomplice was his 18 year old paramour, Carole Tregoff. The only witness; the young au pare from Sweden, Marie Anne Lidholm. Three years and three trials followed, during which the defendants' testimony resulted in two hung juries. The book tells the story of the crime and the court dramas that ensued. And in doing so studies the greed, deceit, jealousy, resentment, and fear of the human nature. It also portrays the bravery and courage of the au pare, Lidholm, who was almost killed by Finch and, undaunted, proceeded to testify at all the trials with remarkable consistency. She is interviewed in the book and has written the introduction. This paperback edition has many photographs.
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Author: Jay Robert Nash

Publisher: Scarecrow Press

ISBN: 1461712157

Category: Law

Page: 1200

View: 7576

This unparalleled reference spans the entire scope of world history offering a thorough investigation into the most infamous crimes and their perpetrators throughout recorded time. Arranged by subject, from Assassination to Terrorism, each chapter begins with an essay that introduces the topic and provides a concise overview of the historical, social, and quite often, political significance of the crime. Subjects are further developed crime-by-crime, from ancient to modern times through descriptive entries covering the criminal acts, modus operandi, criminal background information, and motives along with insightful anecdotes. Every major crime category is presented as a separate, all-inclusive history. Within the two-volumes there are thousands of in-depth profiles and more than 2,000 illustrations, almost half of which are published here for the first time and drawn from the author's personal collection of photographs, drawings, and primary documents. An extensive bibliography of more than 5,000 entries and a comprehensive proper name and subject index make this an easy-to-use and essential reference for those searching for details of the people, places, and events in the world of crime.
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Stories of a Ritual Murder Trial

Author: R. Po-chia Hsia

Publisher: Yale University Press

ISBN: 0300051069

Category: Religion

Page: 173

View: 4146

"On Easter Sunday, 1475, the dead body of a two-year-old boy named Simon was found in the cellar of a Jewish family's house in Trent, Italy. Town magistrates arrested all eighteen Jewish men and one Jewish woman living in Trent on the charge of ritual murder - the killing of a Christian child in order to use his blood in Jewish religious rites. Under judicial torture and imprisonment, the men confessed and were condemned to death; their women-folk, who had been kept under house arrest with their children, denounced the men under torture and eventually converted to Christianity. A papal hearing in Rome about possible judicial misconduct in Trent made the trial widely known and led to a wave of anti-Jewish propaganda and other accusations of ritual murder against the Jews." "In this engrossing book, R. Pochia Hsia reconstructs the events of this tragic persecution, drawing principally on the Yeshiva Manuscript, a detailed trial record made by authorities in Trent to justify their execution of the Jews and to bolster the case for the canonization of "little Martyr Simon." Hsia depicts the Jewish victims (whose testimonies contain fragmentary stories of their tragic lives as well as forced confessions of kidnap, torture, and murder), the prosecuting magistrates, the hostile witnesses, and the few Christian neighbors who tried in vain to help the Jews. Setting the trial and its documents in the historical context of medieval blood libel, Hsia vividly portrays how fact and fiction can be blurred, how judicial torture can be couched in icy orderliness and impersonality, and how religious rites can be interpreted as ceremonies of barbarism."--BOOK JACKET.Title Summary field provided by Blackwell North America, Inc. All Rights Reserved
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The Forgotten Trial of Wyatt Earp

Author: Steven Lubet

Publisher: Yale University Press

ISBN: 9780300115277

Category: History

Page: 253

View: 969

The gunfight at the OK Corral is legendary--but what happened once the shooting ended? This book tells the nearly unknown story of the prosecution of Wyatt Earp, his brothers, and Doc Holliday following the gunfight and shows how a talented defense attorney saved them from the gallows. "[One of the] gems in the vast . . . literature on Wyatt Earp. . . . Lubet’s study of the complicated legal aftermath of the OK Corral manages to be stylish and . . . elegant, a virtue not often found in outlaw studies."--Larry McMurtry, New York Review of Books "This is the first book to examine in depth these legal proceedings, and no one could have done a better job. Lubet explains, in a clear and interesting way, how Arizona territorial law worked in the 1880s.”--Michael F. Blake, Chicago Tribune
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The Classic True Story of Murder, Passion, and Power

Author: Thomas Thompson

Publisher: Open Road Media

ISBN: 150404326X

Category: True Crime

Page: 450

View: 5882

Edgar Award Winner: The “gripping” true story of a beautiful Texas socialite, her ambitious husband, and a string of mysterious deaths (Los Angeles Times). Joan Robinson Hill was a world-class equestrian, a glamorous member of Houston high society, and the wife of Dr. John Hill, a handsome and successful plastic surgeon. Her father, Ash Robinson, was a charismatic oil tycoon obsessed with making his daughter’s every dream come true. Rich, attractive, and reckless, Joan was one of the most celebrated women in a town infatuated with money, power, and fame. Then one morning in 1969, she fell mysteriously ill. The sordid events that followed comprise “what may be the most compelling and complex case in crime annals” (Ann Rule, bestselling author of The Stranger Beside Me). From the elegant mansions of River Oaks, one of America’s most exclusive neighborhoods, to a seedy underworld of prostitution and murder-for-hire, New York Times–bestselling author Thomas Thompson tracks down every bizarre motive and enigmatic clue to weave a fascinating tale of lust and vengeance. Full of colorful characters, shocking twists, and deadly secrets, Blood and Money is “an absolute spellbinder” and true crime masterpiece (Newsweek).
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A Critical Analysis for Lawyers and Laymen

Author: Felix Frankfurter

Publisher: William S. Hein & Co., Inc.

ISBN: 9781575888057

Category: Law

Page: 118

View: 6635

Frankfurter's aim in this work is to give a brief, yet accurate, account of the facts surrounding the case from the earliest stages to its present state as of the date of publication in 1927. His account is based on the court proceedings, along with references to extrinsic facts as were necessary for understanding what transpired in court. Appendix A includes a tabular study by Counsel of Sacco and Vanzetti which compares important hypotheses between Morelli-Madeiros and Sacco-Vanzetti. Appendix B includes an editorial that was published in the Boston Herald on Oct. 26, 1926.
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The True Story of a Beautiful Co-ed, a Vicious Murder, and the Trial that Tore Apart a Town

Author: William Van Meter

Publisher: Macmillan

ISBN: 9780312373092

Category: True Crime

Page: 256

View: 5128

Documents the 2003 murder of eighteen-year-old college freshman Kate Autry, describing the investigation into and arrests of two young men as well as the responses of diverse residents of the victim's sedate college community.
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Peoples and Cultures

Author: Lynn Hunt,Thomas R. Martin,Barbara H. Rosenwein,Bonnie G. Smith

Publisher: Macmillan

ISBN: 0312672713

Category: History

Page: 672

View: 6127

Students of Western civilization need more than facts. They need to understand the cross-cultural, global exchanges that shaped Western history; to be able to draw connections between the social, cultural, political, economic, and intellectual happenings in a given era; and to see the West not as a fixed region, but a living, evolving construct. These needs have long been central to The Making of the West. The book’s chronological narrative emphasizes the wide variety of peoples and cultures that created Western civilization and places them together in a common context, enabling students to witness the unfolding of Western history, understand change over time, and recognize fundamental relationships.
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