An Introduction to Quantitative Approaches

Author: Pat Hudson,Mina Ishizu

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN: 1849665729

Category: History

Page: 360

View: 1600

Fully updated and carefully revised, this new 2nd edition of History by Numbers still stands alone as the only textbook on quantitative methods suitable for students of history. Even the numerically challenged will find inspiration. Taking a problem-solving approach and using authentic historical data, it describes each method in turn, including its origin, purpose, usefulness and associated pitfalls. The problems are developed gradually and with narrative skill, allowing readers to experience the moment of discovery for each of the interpretative outcomes. Quantitative methods are essential for the modern historian, and this lively and accessible text will prove an invaluable guide for anyone entering the discipline.
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An Introduction to Quantitative Approaches

Author: Pat Hudson,Mina Ishizu

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN: 1849665737

Category: History

Page: 360

View: 2317

Fully updated and carefully revised, this new 2nd edition of History by Numbers still stands alone as the only textbook on quantitative methods suitable for students of history. Even the numerically challenged will find inspiration. Taking a problem-solving approach and using authentic historical data, it describes each method in turn, including its origin, purpose, usefulness and associated pitfalls. The problems are developed gradually and with narrative skill, allowing readers to experience the moment of discovery for each of the interpretative outcomes. Quantitative methods are essential for the modern historian, and this lively and accessible text will prove an invaluable guide for anyone entering the discipline.
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An Introduction to Quantitative Approaches

Author: Pat Hudson

Publisher: Hodder Arnold

ISBN: 9780340614686

Category: History

Page: 278

View: 1788

For history students new to the field, this comprehensive, but easily accessible guide stands alone as the only textbook on quantitative methods. Taking a problem-solving approach and using authentic historical data, it describes each method in turn, including its origin, purpose, usefulness, and associated pitfalls. The problems are developed gradually, allowing readers to experience for themselves the moment of discovery for each of the interpretative outcomes. Quantitative methods are now essential for the modern historian, and this lively and readable text will prove an invaluable guide for anyone entering the discipline.
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Their History and Meaning

Author: Graham Flegg

Publisher: Courier Corporation

ISBN: 0486166511

Category: Mathematics

Page: 304

View: 4107

Readable, jargon-free book examines the earliest endeavors to count and record numbers, initial attempts to solve problems by using equations, and origins of infinite cardinal arithmetic. "Surprisingly exciting." — Choice.
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Using History to Evaluate Combat Factors and Predict the Outcome of Battles

Author: Trevor Nevitt Dupuy

Publisher: NOVA Publications (VA)

ISBN: N.A

Category: Social Science

Page: 256

View: 8296

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Counting and the Course of Human Cultures

Author: Caleb Everett

Publisher: Harvard University Press

ISBN: 0674504437

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 312

View: 611

Number concepts are a human invention developed and refined over millennia. They allow us to grasp quantities precisely: recent research shows that most specific quantities are not perceived in the absence of a number system. Numbers are not innate or universal; yet without them, the world as we know it would not exist.
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The Unfolding of History through the Mystery of Number

Author: Richard Heath

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN: 1594777195

Category: Body, Mind & Spirit

Page: 256

View: 961

An exploration of the origins and influences of number from prehistory to modern time • Reveals the deeper meaning of the symbols and esoteric knowledge of secret societies • Explains the numerical sophistication of ancient monuments • Shows how the Templar design for Washington, D.C., represents the New Jerusalem The ubiquitous use of certain sacred numbers and ratios can be found throughout history, influencing everything from art and architecture to the development of religion and secret societies. In Sacred Number and the Origins of Civilization, Richard Heath reveals the origins, widespread influences, and deeper meaning of these synchronous numerical occurrences and how they were left within our planetary environment during the creation of the earth, the moon, and our solar system. Exploring astronomy, harmony, geomancy, sacred centers, and myth, Heath reveals the secret use of sacred number knowledge in the building of Gothic cathedrals and the important influence of sacred numbers in the founding of modern Western culture. He explains the role secret societies play as a repository for this numerical information and how those who attempt to decode its meaning without understanding the planetary origins of this knowledge are left with contradictory, cryptic, and often deceptive information. By examining prehistoric and monumental cultures through the Dark Ages and later recorded history, Sacred Number and the Origins of Civilization provides a key to understanding the true role and meaning of number.
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A Short History of the Numbers That Rule Our World

Author: Zachary Karabell

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN: 1451651228

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 304

View: 6510

A history and critical assessment of leading indicators reveals their indelible impact on the economy, public policy, and other critical decisions, discussing their shortcomings while making suggestions for reducing dependence on them.
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Essays on the History of Statistical Graphics

Author: Charles Kostelnick

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 135153761X

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 330

View: 2166

Bringing together scholars from around the world, this collection examines many of the historical developments in making data visible through charts, graphs, thematic maps, and now interactive displays. Today, we are used to seeing data portrayed in a dizzying array of graphic forms. Virtually any quantified knowledge, from social and physical science to engineering and medicine, as well as business, government, or personal activity, has been visualized. Yet the methods of making data visible are relatively new innovations, most stemming from eighteenth- and nineteenth-century innovations that arose as a logical response to a growing desire to quantify everything-from science, economics, and industry to population, health, and crime. Innovators such as Playfair, Alexander von Humboldt, Heinrich Berghaus, John Snow, Florence Nightingale, Francis Galton, and Charles Minard began to develop graphical methods to make data and their relations more visible. In the twentieth century, data design became both increasingly specialized within new and existing disciplines-science, engineering, social science, and medicine-and at the same time became further democratized, with new forms that make statistical, business, and government data more accessible to the public. At the close of the twentieth century and the beginning of the twenty-first, an explosion in interactive digital data design has exponentially increased our access to data. The contributors analyze this fascinating history through a variety of critical approaches, including visual rhetoric, visual culture, genre theory, and fully contextualized historical scholarship.
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A Complete Team History of the Broadway Blueshirts by Uniform Number

Author: Mark Rosenman,Howie Karpin

Publisher: Skyhorse Publishing Inc.

ISBN: 1683581784

Category: Sports & Recreation

Page: 492

View: 6296

What do Alexi Kovalev, Ted Irvine, and Mike Rogers all have in common? They all wore number 27 for the New York Rangers. Current team captain Ryan McDonagh joined their ranks when he became a Ranger in 2010. Since the Rangers first adopted uniform numbers in 1926, the team has handed out only 83 numbers to more than 1,000 players. That’s a lot of overlap. It also makes for a lot of good stories. New York Rangers by the Numbers tells those stories for every Ranger since ’26, from Clarence Abel to Mats Zuccarello. This book lists the players alphabetically and by number; these biographies help trace the history of one of hockey’s oldest and most beloved teams in a new way. For Rangers fans, anyone who ever wore the uniform is like family. New York Rangers by the Numbers reintroduces readers to some of their long-lost ancestors, even those they think they already know.
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An Illustrated History of Numbers

Author: Tom Jackson

Publisher: Ponderables

ISBN: 9781627950954

Category: Mathematics

Page: 168

View: 4826

"Includes foldout timeline with over 1,000 milestone facts" -- Cover.
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How to Excel at Math and Science (even If You Flunked Algebra)

Author: Barbara A. Oakley

Publisher: TarcherPerigree

ISBN: 039916524X

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 316

View: 2547

An engineering professor who started out doing poorly in mathematical and technical subjects in school offers tools, tips and techniques to learning the creative and analytical thought processes that will lead to achievement in math and science. Original.
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Author: Pat Hudson

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN: 1474228895

Category: History

Page: 256

View: 8296

This is an introduction to the Industrial Revolution which offers an integrated account of the economic and social aspects of change during the period. Recent revisionist thinking has implied that fundamental change in economic, social and political life at the time of the Industrial Revolution was minimal or non-existent. The author challenges this interpretation, arguing that the process of revision has gone too far; emphasizing continuity at the expense of change and neglecting many historically unique features of the economy and society. Elements given short shrift in many current interpretations are reassigned their central roles.
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How Love Conquered Marriage

Author: Stephanie Coontz

Publisher: Penguin

ISBN: 9781101118252

Category: History

Page: 448

View: 2558

Just when the clamor over "traditional" marriage couldn’t get any louder, along comes this groundbreaking book to ask, "What tradition?" In Marriage, a History, historian and marriage expert Stephanie Coontz takes readers from the marital intrigues of ancient Babylon to the torments of Victorian lovers to demonstrate how recent the idea of marrying for love is—and how absurd it would have seemed to most of our ancestors. It was when marriage moved into the emotional sphere in the nineteenth century, she argues, that it suffered as an institution just as it began to thrive as a personal relationship. This enlightening and hugely entertaining book brings intelligence, perspective, and wit to today’s marital debate.
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Author: Leo Corry

Publisher: OUP Oxford

ISBN: 0191007072

Category: Mathematics

Page: 368

View: 4344

The world around us is saturated with numbers. They are a fundamental pillar of our modern society, and accepted and used with hardly a second thought. But how did this state of affairs come to be? In this book, Leo Corry tells the story behind the idea of number from the early days of the Pythagoreans, up until the turn of the twentieth century. He presents an overview of how numbers were handled and conceived in classical Greek mathematics, in the mathematics of Islam, in European mathematics of the middle ages and the Renaissance, during the scientific revolution, all the way through to the mathematics of the 18th to the early 20th century. Focusing on both foundational debates and practical use numbers, and showing how the story of numbers is intimately linked to that of the idea of equation, this book provides a valuable insight to numbers for undergraduate students, teachers, engineers, professional mathematicians, and anyone with an interest in the history of mathematics.
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First Nations and the Great Lakes Borders and Borderlands

Author: Karl S. Hele

Publisher: Wilfrid Laurier Univ. Press

ISBN: 1554580048

Category: History

Page: 351

View: 942

Proceedings of a conference held at University of Western Ontario, London, Ont., Feb. 11-12, 2005.
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A Complete Team History of the Bronx Bombers by Uniform Number

Author: Bill Gutman

Publisher: Skyhorse Publishing Inc.

ISBN: 1602397635

Category: Sports & Recreation

Page: 423

View: 9411

Listing more than fifteen hundred players who ever wore a number, uses current and retired New York Yankees uniform numbers to provide a history of the New York Yankees baseball team.
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Author: David Spiegelhalter

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9781781253298

Category: Social Science

Page: 368

View: 8747

Whatever society we live in, and however open-minded we like to think we are, when it comes to our sex lives we all like to keep a few secrets. But this makes the jobs of sexologists - professionals who study sexual behaviour - pretty difficult.Luckily, David Spiegelhalter, Professor of Risk at Cambridge University, is here to unravel the web of exaggerations, misdirections and downright lies that surround sex in modern society. Drawing on the Natsal survey, the widest survey of sexual behaviour since the Kinsey Report, he answers crucial questions such as what are we all doing? How often? And how has it changed?Accompanying a major Wellcome exhibition on the same subject, Sex by Numbers is an informed and entertaining look at the most enduring of human obsessions, from one-night stands to the seven-year itch.
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A Primer in Quantitative Methods for Historians

Author: Charles H. Feinstein,Mark Thomas

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9780521001373

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 547

View: 4477

Authoritative guide to using quantitative methods in history; clearly illustrated and accompanied by website material.
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Author: Sonja Cameron,Sarah Richardson

Publisher: Macmillan International Higher Education

ISBN: 0230204481

Category: Computers

Page: 192

View: 888

Information and communications technology is now an essential tool for the historian and for anyone engaging in historical study. Today's 'history workstation' includes computers, modems, scanners, printers, digital cameras and a wide range of software applications to access the World Wide Web and to analyse historical sources. Sonja Cameron and Sarah Richardson provide a clear, jargon-free introduction which demystifies the computing skills needed for historical research. This step-by-step guide covers all aspects of history and computing including: - presentation: from word-processing an article which conforms to scholarly protocols to presenting a slide show - history and the World Wide Web: hints and tips on accessing and evaluating the wide range of historical material available on the internet - databases: a clear introduction which guides you through the process of creating your own database of historical sources - spreadsheets: a lucid explanation of basic quantitative methods, data analysis, graphing and charting - digitised text and images: help on analysing digitised text, creating images and web pages. The text is supported throughout by worked examples using historical sources, comprehensive illustrations, a detailed glossary and signposts to further study where appropriate. Using Computers in History is an indispensable aid to all those studying and researching history. Students, family and local historians, and history enthusiasts will all find this book informative and easy-to-use.
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