Author: J.B Bury

Publisher: Charles River Editors via PublishDrive

ISBN: 1614304629

Category: History

Page: N.A

View: 1234

History of the Later Roman Empire:From the Death of Theodosius I to the Death of Justinianby noted historian J.B. Bury, consists of two volumes: The German Conquest of Rome, and The Age of Justinian.It chronicles the fall of the Western Roman Empire and the emergence of the Eastern Roman Empire.
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Author: J. B. Bury

Publisher: Courier Corporation

ISBN: 0486143384

Category: History

Page: 512

View: 7655

Volume 1 of classic history. One of the world's foremost historians chronicles the major forces and events in the history of the Western and Byzantine Empires from the death of Theodosius (A.D. 395) to the death of Justinian (A.D. 565).
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A Social Economic and Administrative Survey

Author: Arnold Hugh Martin Jones

Publisher: Taylor & Francis

ISBN: 9780801833540

Category: History

Page: 1518

View: 7751

The book presents a narrative account of Roman political, military, and religious history from 284 to 602.
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Author: Gibbon, Edward

Publisher: Delmarva Publications, Inc.

ISBN: N.A

Category:

Page: 582

View: 5500

All six volumes contained in the eBook, and there is a linked table of contents, the footnotes are also linked. Gibbon’s masterpiece, which narrates the history of the Roman Empire from the second century a.d. to its collapse in the west in the fifth century and in the east in the fifteenth century, is widely considered the greatest work of history ever written. The History of the Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire (sometimes shortened to Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire) is a book of history written by the English historian Edward Gibbon, which traces the trajectory of Western civilization (as well as the Islamic and Mongolian conquests) from the height of the Roman Empire to the fall of Byzantium. Published in six volumes, volume I was published in 1776 and went through six printings. Volumes II and III were published in 1781; volumes IV, V, and VI in 1788–89. The original volumes were published in quarto sections, a common publishing practice of the time. The work covers the history of the Roman Empire, Europe, and the Catholic Church from 98 to 1590 and discusses the decline of the Roman Empire in the East and West. Because of its relative objectivity and heavy use of primary sources, at the time its methodology became a model for later historians. This led to Gibbon being called the first "modern historian of ancient Rome". Gibbon offers an explanation for why the Roman Empire fell, a task made difficult by a lack of comprehensive written sources, though he was not the only historian to tackle the subject. According to Gibbon, the Roman Empire succumbed to barbarian invasions in large part due to the gradual loss of civic virtue among its citizens. They had become weak, outsourcing their duties to defend their Empire to barbarian mercenaries, who then became so numerous and ingrained that they were able to take over the Empire. Romans, he believed, had become effeminate, unwilling to live a tougher, "manly" military lifestyle. In addition, Gibbon argued that Christianity created a belief that a better life existed after death, which fostered an indifference to the present among Roman citizens, thus sapping their desire to sacrifice for the Empire. He also believed its comparative pacifism tended to hamper the traditional Roman martial spirit. Finally, like other Enlightenment thinkers, Gibbon held in contempt the Middle Ages as a priest-ridden, superstitious dark age. It was not until his own age of reason and rational thought, it was believed, that human history could resume its progress. Gibbon sees the Praetorian Guard as the primary catalyst of the empire's initial decay and eventual collapse, a seed planted by Augustus at the establishment of the empire. He cites repeated examples of the Praetorian Guard abusing their power with calamitous results, including numerous instances of imperial assassination and incessant demands for increased pay. Gibbon's style is frequently distinguished by an ironically detached and somewhat dispassionate yet critical tone. He occasionally lapsed into moralization and aphorism. "As long as mankind shall continue to bestow more liberal applause on their destroyers than on their benefactors, the thirst of military glory will ever be the vice of the most exalted characters". "The influence of the clergy, in an age of superstition, might be usefully employed to assert the rights of mankind; but so intimate is the connection between the throne and the altar, that the banner of the church has very seldom been seen on the side of the people"(Chapter Three). "History...is, indeed, little more than the register of the crimes, follies, and misfortune of mankind"(ibid). "If we contrast the rapid progress of this mischievous discovery [of gunpowder] with the slow and laborious advances of reason, science, and the arts of peace, a philosopher, according to his temper, will laugh or weep at the folly of mankind" (Chapter). Gibbon provides the reader with a glimpse of his thought process with extensive notes along the body of the text, a precursor to the modern use of footnotes. Gibbon's footnotes are famous for their idiosyncratic and often humorous style, and have been called "Gibbon's table talk." They provide an entertaining moral commentary on both ancient Rome and 18th-century Great Britain. This technique enabled Gibbon to compare ancient Rome to modern times. Gibbon's work advocates a rationalist and progressive view of history.
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Author: Stephen Mitchell

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN: 1118341066

Category: History

Page: 568

View: 2216

The Second Edition of A History of the Later Roman Empirefeatures extensive revisions and updates to the highly-acclaimed,sweeping historical survey of the Roman Empire from the accessionof Diocletian in AD 284 to the death of Heraclius in 641. Features a revised narrative of the political history thatshaped the late Roman Empire Includes extensive changes to the chapters on regional history,especially those relating to Asia Minor and Egypt Offers a renewed evaluation of the decline of the empire in thelater sixth and seventh centuries Places a larger emphasis on the military deficiencies, collapseof state finances, and role of bubonic plague throughout the Europein Rome’s decline Includes systematic updates to the bibliography
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Die tausendjährige Geschichte Roms

Author: Mary Beard

Publisher: S. Fischer Verlag

ISBN: 3104031444

Category: History

Page: 656

View: 7989

Wer hätte gedacht, dass Alte Geschichte so spannend und gegenwärtig sein kann? – Ein neuer Blick auf das alte Rom! Unkonventionell, scharfsinnig und zugleich akademisch versiert – dies trifft nicht nur auf die hochrenommierte Althistorikerin und Cambridge-Professorin Mary Beard selbst zu, sondern auch auf ihre neue große Geschichte des Römischen Reichs und seiner Bewohner: SPQR - Die tausendjährige Geschichte Roms. Begeistert erzählt sie die Geschichte eines Weltreichs, lässt uns Kriege, Exzesse, Intrigen miterleben, aber auch den römischen Alltag – wie Ärger in den Mietshäusern und Ciceros Scheidung. Sie lässt uns hinter die Legenden und Mythen blicken, hinterfragt sicher Geglaubtes und kommt zu überraschenden Einsichten. So erscheint Rom ganz nah – in seinen Debatten über Integration und Migration – und dann doch auch faszinierend fern, wenn es etwa um Sklaverei geht. Die Geschichte Roms für unsere Zeit. In prächtiger Ausstattung, mit über hundert s/w Abbildungen und umfangreichem farbigen Bildteil. »Bahnbrechend [...], anregend [...], revolutionär [...] ein völlig neuer Zugang zur Alten Geschichte.« Spectator »Aufregend, psychologisch scharfsinnig sowie mitfühlend kritisch.« Sunday Times »Meisterhaft [...], diese große Geschichte Roms erweckt die ferne Vergangenheit grandios zum Leben.« The Economist »Ungemein packend [...] ebenso unterhaltsam wie gelehrt.« Observer »Wer hätte gedacht, dass Geschichte so spannend sein kann?« Independent
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Author: Philip Sabin,Hans van Wees,Michael Whitby

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 0521782740

Category: History

Page: 630

View: 1197

Second volume of a systematic and up-to-date account of Roman warfare from the Late Republic to Justinian.
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The First Great Plague and the End of the Roman Empire

Author: William Rosen

Publisher: Penguin

ISBN: 1101202424

Category: History

Page: 384

View: 4435

From the acclaimed author of Miracle Cure and The Third Horseman, the epic story of the collision between one of nature's smallest organisms and history's mightiest empire During the golden age of the Roman Empire, Emperor Justinian reigned over a territory that stretched from Italy to North Africa. It was the zenith of his achievements and the last of them. In 542 AD, the bubonic plague struck. In weeks, the glorious classical world of Justinian had been plunged into the medieval and modern Europe was born. At its height, five thousand people died every day in Constantinople. Cities were completely depopulated. It was the first pandemic the world had ever known and it left its indelible mark: when the plague finally ended, more than 25 million people were dead. Weaving together history, microbiology, ecology, jurisprudence, theology, and epidemiology, Justinian's Flea is a unique and sweeping account of the little known event that changed the course of a continent. From the Trade Paperback edition.
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Text, Translation and Historiographical Notes

Author: R. C. Blockley

Publisher: Oxbow Books Limited

ISBN: 9780905205496

Category: History

Page: 515

View: 4381

This volume is the much larger companion to Roger Blockley's similarly-titled monograph, published in 1981 (ARCA 6). The earlier volume gave a commented conspectus of the fragments, and essays on the individual historians. In vol. II the texts themselves are printed, with English translations and historiographical notes. Included also is a correlation of Blockley's order with the older numbering of Mueller, Dindorf and Niebuhr, and indices of names, places, quotations and citations. This work, with the earlier monograph, has become a standard for the increasingly important study of the later Roman Empire.
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Author: Scott Fitzgerald Johnson

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0199996334

Category: History

Page: 1296

View: 3440

The Oxford Handbook of Late Antiquity offers an innovative overview of a period (c. 300-700 CE) that has become increasingly central to scholarly debates over the history of western and Middle Eastern civilizations. This volume covers such pivotal events as the fall of Rome, the rise of Christianity, the origins of Islam, and the early formation of Byzantium and the European Middle Ages. These events are set in the context of widespread literary, artistic, cultural, and religious change during the period. The geographical scope of this Handbook is unparalleled among comparable surveys of Late Antiquity; Arabia, Egypt, Central Asia, and the Balkans all receive dedicated treatments, while the scope extends to the western kingdoms, and North Africa in the West. Furthermore, from economic theory and slavery to Greek and Latin poetry, Syriac and Coptic literature, sites of religious devotion, and many others, this Handbook covers a wide range of topics that will appeal to scholars from a diverse array of disciplines. The Oxford Handbook of Late Antiquity engages the perennially valuable questions about the end of the ancient world and the beginning of the medieval, while providing a much-needed touchstone for the study of Late Antiquity itself.
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Author: Edward Miller,Cynthia Postan,M. M. Postan

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9780521087094

Category: History

Page: 1024

View: 2302

The second volume of The Cambridge Economic History of Europe, first published in 1952, was a survey by an international group of specialist scholars covering trade and industry in pre-Roman, Roman and Byzantine Europe, the medieval trade of northern and southern Europe, and the histories of medieval woollen manufacture, mining and metallurgy, and building in stone. This second edition, in addition to revising most chapters and the bibliographies appended to them, also fills gaps which arose from the wartime and post-war circumstances in which the first edition was written. New chapters provide accounts of the trade and industry of eastern Europe, of medieval Europe's trade with Asia and Africa, and of medieval coinage and currency. Taken with volumes I and III of the series, this volume is designed to complete a comprehensive review of the economic history of medieval Europe as a whole. It was planned by the late Sir Michael Postan, and was largely completed under his editorship.
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