The Places That Shaped the Tudor World

Author: SIMON. THURLEY

Publisher: Black Swan

ISBN: 9781784160494

Category:

Page: 520

View: 6849

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An Architectural History of the Royal Apartments, 1240-1698

Author: Simon Thurley

Publisher: Yale University Press

ISBN: 0300076398

Category: Architecture

Page: 185

View: 1123

Compiles information about a myriad of topics, ranging from the arts and life sciences to computers and the zodiac. 8 yrs+
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Elizabeth I and the Politics of Ceremony

Author: Mary Hill Cole

Publisher: Univ of Massachusetts Press

ISBN: 9781558492141

Category: History

Page: 277

View: 4523

The progresses were both emblematic of Elizabeth's rule and intrinsic to her ability to govern." "In this book, Mary Hill Cole provides a detailed analysis of the progresses. Drawing on royal household accounts, ministerial correspondence, county archives, corporation records, and family papers, she examines the effects of the visits on the queen's household and government, the individual and civic hosts, and the monarchy of the Virgin Queen."--BOOK JACKET.
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Merchants, Adventurers, and Money in Shakespeare's City

Author: Stephen Alford

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing USA

ISBN: 1620408236

Category: History

Page: 336

View: 1362

The dramatic story of the dazzling growth of London in the sixteenth century. For most, England in the sixteenth century was the era of the Tudors, from Henry VII and VIII to Elizabeth I. But as their dramas played out at court, England was being transformed economically by the astonishing discoveries of the New World and of direct sea routes to Asia. At the start of the century, England was hardly involved in the wider world and London remained a gloomy, introverted medieval city. But as the century progressed something extraordinary happened, which placed London at the center of the world stage forever. Stephen Alford's evocative, original new book uses the same skills that made his widely-praised The Watchers so successful, bringing to life the network of merchants, visionaries, crooks, and sailors who changed London and England forever. In a sudden explosion of energy, English ships were suddenly found all over the world--trading with Russia and the Levant, exploring Virginia and the Arctic, and fanning out across the Indian Ocean. The people who made this possible--the families, the guild members, the money-men who were willing to risk huge sums and sometimes their own lives in pursuit of the rare, exotic, and desirable--are as interesting as any of those at court. Their ambitions fueled a new view of the world--initiating a long era of trade and empire, the consequences of which still resonate today.
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A Journey Back in Time

Author: Natalie Grueninger

Publisher: The History Press

ISBN: 075098502X

Category: Travel

Page: 256

View: 8521

This engaging and practical travel guide takes you on a journey through the best of Tudor London, to sites built and associated with this fascinating dynasty, and to the museums and galleries that house tantalizing treasures from this rich period of history. Explore evocative historical sites, including the magnificent great hall of Eltham Palace, the most substantial surviving remnant of the medieval palace where Henry VIII spent time as a child, and the lesser-known delights of St. Helen's Church, dubbed the "Westminster Abbey of the City" for its impressive collection of Tudor monuments. Photographs, maps, and visitor information, together with an informative narrative, bring the most intriguing personalities and stories of the 30-plus sites across Greater London vividly to life. This a must-have companion for both those planning their own "Tudor pilgrimage" and for the armchair traveler alike.
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Author: Natalie Grueninger

Publisher: Amberley Publishing Limited

ISBN: 1445635364

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 288

View: 4570

The visitor's companion to the palaces, castles & houses associated with Henry VIII's infamous wife.
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A Tudor House Revealed

Author: Maurice Howard,Edward Wilson

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9780707803173

Category: Architecture

Page: 160

View: 8990

The Vyne in Hampshire was built in the early 16th century by William, 1st Lord Sandys, Henry VIII's Lord Chamberlain. Much of the house has survived, but parts of the enormous structure have disappeared over the centuries. In 1996, therefore, the National Trust undertook a major survey of the house, gardens and park, including archeological excavation. The fascinating results are revealed here. The fascinating results are written up here, to show not only how The Vyne functioned as a courtier's house, but also how it relates to the findings at Hampton Court Palace, and other Tudor great houses. For students of archeology, and for the general reader, the book offers insight into modern techniques and processes of the archeology of standing buildings.
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Tapestries at the Tudor Court

Author: Thomas P. Campbell

Publisher: Paul Mellon Ctr for Studies

ISBN: N.A

Category: Antiques & Collectibles

Page: 419

View: 1329

"Campbell sheds light on Tudor political and artistic culture and the court's response to Renaissance aesthetic ideals. He challenges the predominantly text-driven histories of the period and offers a fresh perspective on the life of Henry VIII"--OCLC
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Author: James P. Carley

Publisher: London : British Library

ISBN: N.A

Category: History

Page: 161

View: 4389

King Henry VIII was one of the most intelligent and widely read monarchs of the renaissance. From surviving catalogues, which tell us what books he had, it is clear he was deeply involved in theological debate and monastic history, especially when moving to the break with Rome. At the same time, he was a Humanist scholar ahead of his time in all the liberal arts, especially music and poetry. Equally, most of his wives were also avid readers who collected a variety of books. In this important new work, leading scholar James P. Carley describes Henry VIII's books and their significance for a deeper understanding of this seemingly familiar monarch and his wives. The extensive illustrations allow us to examine the binding and content of the collection, as well as providing some examples of marginalia in Henry's own hand.
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Author: Nigel Baker,Pat Hughes,Richard K. Morriss

Publisher: Oxbow Books

ISBN: 1785708171

Category: Architecture

Page: 256

View: 7480

The cathedral city of Hereford is one of the best-kept historical secrets of the Welsh Marches. Although its Anglo-Saxon development is well known from a series of classic excavations in the 1960s and ’70s, what is less widely known is that the city boasts an astonishingly well-preserved medieval plan and contains some of the earliest houses still in everyday use anywhere in England. Three leading authorities on the buildings of the English Midlands have joined forces combining detailed archaeological surveys, primary historical research, and topographical analysis to examine 24 of the most important buildings, from the great hall of the Bishop’s Palace of c.1190, to the first surviving brick town-house of c.1690. Fully illustrated with photographs, historic maps, and explanatory diagrams, the case-studies include canonical and mercantile hall-houses of the Middle Ages, mansions, commercial premises, and simple suburban dwellings of the early modern period. Owners and builders are identified from documentary sources wherever possible, from the Bishop of Hereford and the medieval cathedral canons, through civic office-holding merchant dynasties, to minor tradesmen otherwise known only for their brushes with the law.
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A History of the Family That Shaped Britain

Author: Allan Massie

Publisher: Macmillan

ISBN: 142995082X

Category: History

Page: 384

View: 4272

"Compelling...A masterly feat...A magnificent, sweeping, authoritative, warm yet wry history." --The Wall Street Journal In this fascinating and intimate portrait of the Stuarts, author Allan Massie takes us deep into one of history's bloodiest and most tumultuous reigns. Exploring the family's lineage from the first Stuart king to the last, The Royal Stuarts is a panoramic history of the family that acted as a major player in the Scottish Wars of Independence, the Union of the Crowns, the English Civil War, the Restoration, and more. Drawing on the accounts of historians past and present, novels, and plays, this is the complete story of the Stuart family, documenting their path from the salt marshes of Brittany to the thrones of Scotland and England and eventually to exile. The Royal Stuarts brings to life figures like Mary, Queens of Scots, Charles I, and Bonnie Prince Charlie, uncovering a family of strong affections and fierce rivalries. Told with panache, this is the gripping true story of backstabbing, betrayal, and ambition gone awry.
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A Social and Architectural History

Author: Simon Thurley

Publisher: Paul Mellon Ctr for Studies

ISBN: 9780300102239

Category: Architecture

Page: 450

View: 1260

The book takes as its starting point the argument that the only way to understand fully a building such as Hampton Court is to set it in the political and social context of its time and to explore the lives and motivations of its builders. The picture that emerges is on the one hand intensely personal - one of architects and builders fulfilling the whims of kings and princes. On the other hand, it is bureaucratic: Hampton Court is revealed first as the royal household, then as a palace claimed by grace-and-favour residents and finally, by visitors and tourists as their own. The history of the building is taken right up to the beginning of the twenty-first century. The twentieth-century story of Hampton Court is one of conservation and of changing attitudes towards opening up the complex to the public - it covers everything from the agonising discussions as to whether to build public lavatories to an account of the private enterprise that caused an octogenarian to make a personal fortune out of opening the maze to the public. It includes also the story of the terrible fire of 1986 and its aftermath. Social history and architectural history sit side by side in this intriguing account. New and important attributions are made to the architects Hugh May, Nicholas Hawksmoor, William Talman, Colen Campbell and Edward Blore amongst others. Moreover, the palace and its setting are placed in their European context and their long-term architectural significance is gauged. The book is lavishly illustrated with original paintings, prints and drawings, while a specially commissioned suite of plans and reconstructions reveals the evolving form of the buildings.
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A Novel

Author: C. J. Tudor

Publisher: Broadway Books

ISBN: 1524761001

Category: Fiction

Page: 288

View: 1728

“I haven’t had a sleepless night due to a book for a long time. The Chalk Man changed that.” —Fiona Barton, New York Times bestselling author of The Widow “An assured debut that alternates between 1986 and 2016 with unpredictable twists. The Chalk Man fits well with other stories about troubled childhoods such as Stephen King’s novella ‘Stand by Me’… Tudor never misses a beat in showing each character as both a child and an adult while also exploring the foreboding environs of a small town.” - Associated Press A riveting and relentlessly compelling psychological suspense debut that weaves a mystery about a childhood game gone dangerously awry, and will keep readers guessing right up to the shocking ending In 1986, Eddie and his friends are just kids on the verge of adolescence. They spend their days biking around their sleepy English village and looking for any taste of excitement they can get. The chalk men are their secret code: little chalk stick figures they leave for one another as messages only they can understand. But then a mysterious chalk man leads them right to a dismembered body, and nothing is ever the same. In 2016, Eddie is fully grown, and thinks he's put his past behind him. But then he gets a letter in the mail, containing a single chalk stick figure. When it turns out that his friends got the same message, they think it could be a prank . . . until one of them turns up dead. That's when Eddie realizes that saving himself means finally figuring out what really happened all those years ago. Expertly alternating between flashbacks and the present day, The Chalk Man is the very best kind of suspense novel, one where every character is wonderfully fleshed out and compelling, where every mystery has a satisfying payoff, and where the twists will shock even the savviest reader.
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The Story of Margaret Douglas, the Tudor That Time Forgot

Author: Morgan Ring

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing USA

ISBN: 1632866072

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 368

View: 8432

Niece to Henry VIII, heir to the throne, courtier at risk of being killed, spy-mistress, and ambitious political player, Lady Margaret Douglas is a vital new character in the Tudor story. Amidst the Christmas revels of 1530, a fifteen-year-old girl arrived at the court of King Henry VIII. Half-English, half-Scottish, she was his niece, the Lady Margaret Douglas. For the next fifty years, Margaret held a unique and precarious position at the courts of Henry and his children. As the Protestant Reformations unfolded across the British Isles and the Tudor monarchs struggled to produce heirs, she had ambitions of her own. She wanted to see her family ruling a united, Catholic Britain. Through a Machiavellian combination of daring, spying, and luck, Margaret made her son into a suitor to her niece Mary, Queen of Scots. Together, they had a powerful claim to the English throne--so powerful that Queen Elizabeth I feared they would overthrow her and restore both England and Scotland to the Catholic faith. The marriage cost Margaret her position, her freedom, and her beloved son's life. From the glittering Tudor court to the Tower of London, Lady Margaret Douglas weathered triumphs and tragedies in an era of tremendous change. Yet she never lost hope that she would see her family rule throughout the British Isles, which eventually happened when King James (I of England, VI of Scotland) united the crowns in 1603. Drawing on previously unexamined archival sources, So High a Blood presents a fascinating and dramatic portrait of this forgotten Tudor.
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Uncovering the Secrets of Britain's Greatest Dynasty

Author: Tracy Borman

Publisher: Hodder & Stoughton

ISBN: 1444782916

Category: History

Page: 464

View: 2828

'Borman approaches her topic with huge enthusiasm and a keen eye for entertaining...this is a very human story of a remarkable family, full of vignettes that sit long in the mind.' Dan Jones, The Sunday Times 'Tracy Borman's eye for detail is impressive; the book is packed with fascinating courtly minutiae... this is a wonderful book.' The Times 'Borman is an authoritative and engaging writer, good at prising out those humanising details that make the past alive to us.' The Observer 'Fascinating, detailed account of the everyday reality of the royals... This is a book of rich scholarship.' Daily Mail 'Tracy Borman's passion for the Tudor period shines forth from the pages of this fascinatingly detailed book, which vividly illuminates what went on behind the scenes at the Tudor court.' Alison Weir 'I do not live in a corner. A thousand eyes see all I do.' Elizabeth I The Tudor monarchs were constantly surrounded by an army of attendants, courtiers and ministers. Even in their most private moments, they were accompanied by a servant specifically appointed for the task. A groom of the stool would stand patiently by as Henry VIII performed his daily purges, and when Elizabeth I retired for the evening, one of her female servants would sleep at the end of her bed. These attendants knew the truth behind the glamorous exterior. They saw the tears shed by Henry VII upon the death of his son Arthur. They knew the tragic secret behind 'Bloody' Mary's phantom pregnancies. And they saw the 'crooked carcass' beneath Elizabeth I's carefully applied makeup, gowns and accessories. It is the accounts of these eyewitnesses, as well as a rich array of other contemporary sources that historian Tracy Borman has examined more closely than ever before. With new insights and discoveries, and in the same way that she brilliantly illuminated the real Thomas Cromwell - The Private Life of the Tudors will reveal previously unexamined details about the characters we think we know so well.
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from the Wars of the Roses to the Civil War

Author: David Starkey

Publisher: Addison-Wesley Longman Ltd

ISBN: N.A

Category: History

Page: 273

View: 8452

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The Evolution of the English Cathedral Landscape

Author: Roberta Gilchrist

Publisher: Boydell Press

ISBN: 9781843831730

Category: Architecture

Page: 294

View: 8888

Changes in the layout of the cathedral and its close traced over 600 years, using Norwich as a case-study.
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How Britain Saved Its Heritage

Author: Simon Thurley

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9780300205244

Category: Cultural property

Page: 224

View: 7422

Between 1900 and 1950 the British state amassed a huge collection of over 800 historic buildings, monuments and historic sites and opened them to the public. Nothing like it had ever been seen before. This book explains why the extraordinary collecting frenzy took place.
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The Diabolical Duchess

Author: Christine Weightman

Publisher: Amberley Publishing Limited

ISBN: 1445609681

Category: History

Page: 256

View: 9188

The amazing life of Margaret of York, the woman who tried to overthrow the Tudors.
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