Being Young and Arab in America

Author: Moustafa Bayoumi

Publisher: Penguin

ISBN: 1101666552

Category: Social Science

Page: 320

View: 9336

An eye-opening look at how young Arab- and Muslim- Americans are forging lives for themselves in a country that often mistakes them for the enemy Just over a century ago , W.E.B. Du Bois posed a probing question in his classic The Souls of Black Folk: How does it feel to be a problem? Now, Moustafa Bayoumi asks the same about America's new "problem"-Arab- and Muslim-Americans. Bayoumi takes readers into the lives of seven twenty-somethings living in Brooklyn, home to the largest Arab-American population in the United States. He moves beyond stereotypes and clichés to reveal their often unseen struggles, from being subjected to government surveillance to the indignities of workplace discrimination. Through it all, these young men and women persevere through triumphs and setbacks as they help weave the tapestry of a new society that is, at its heart, purely American.
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Being Young and Arab in America

Author: Moustafa Bayoumi

Publisher: Penguin Press HC

ISBN: N.A

Category: Social Science

Page: 290

View: 7865

A study of the Arab- and Muslim-American experience as reflected in the lives of seven young men and women in Brooklyn evaluates their encounters with prejudice and their relationships with friends and family members in the Middle East.
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Being Young and Arab in America

Author: Moustafa Bayoumi

Publisher: Penguin Paperbacks

ISBN: 9780143115410

Category: Social Science

Page: 300

View: 8340

A study of the Arab- and Muslim-American experience as reflected in the lives of seven young men and women in Brooklyn evaluates their encounters with prejudice and their relationships with friends and family members in the Middle East.
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Building a New Future

Author: Michael Suleiman

Publisher: Temple University Press

ISBN: 9781439906538

Category: Social Science

Page: 360

View: 6813

Setting the record straight about Arab American culture.
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New Cultural Politics in the Global South and North

Author: Asef Bayat,Linda Herrera

Publisher: Oxford University Press on Demand

ISBN: 0195369211

Category: Religion

Page: 428

View: 6985

This volume explores the ways in which the young, both in Muslim majority societies and Muslim communities in the West, negotiate their Muslim identity in relation to their youthful desires - their individuality, the search for autonomy and security for the future.
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From Invisible Citizens to Visible Subjects

Author: Amaney A. Jamal

Publisher: Syracuse University Press

ISBN: 9780815631774

Category: Social Science

Page: 378

View: 5217

Bringing the rich terrain of Arab American histories to bear on conceptualizations of race in the U.S., this groundbreaking volume fills a critical gap in the field of U.S. racial and ethnic studies. The articles collected here highlight emergent discourses on the distinct ways that race matters to the study of Arab American histories and experiences and asks essential questions. What is the relationship between U.S. imperialism in Arab homelands and anti-Arab racism in the U.S.? In what ways have the axes of nation, religion, class, and gender intersected with Arab American racial formations? What is the significance of whiteness studies to Arab American studies? Transcending multiculturalist discourses that have simply "added on" the category "Arab American" to the landscape of U.S. racial and ethnic studies after the attacks of September 11th, 2001, this volume locates September 11 as a turning point, rather than a beginning, in Arab Americans' diverse engagements with "race."--provided by publisher.
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Author: Samir Kassir,Robert Fisk,Will Hobson

Publisher: Verso Books

ISBN: 1844672808

Category: History

Page: 96

View: 5751

In the years before his assassination in 2005, Samir Kassir became one of Lebanon's foremost public intellectuals, a fearless critic of tyranny and an inspiring advocate of democracy. In Being Arab, his last book, he calls on the peoples of the Middle East to reject both Western double standards and Islamism in order to take the future of the region into their own hands. With the Arab Spring, millions have now answered that call.
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Dispatches from the War on Terror

Author: Moustafa Bayoumi

Publisher: NYU Press

ISBN: 1479835641

Category: Political Science

Page: 304

View: 8920

Over the last few years, Moustafa Bayoumi has been an extra in Sex and the City 2 playing a generic Arab, a terrorist suspect (or at least his namesake “Mustafa Bayoumi” was) in a detective novel, the subject of a trumped-up controversy because a book he had written was seen by right-wing media as pushing an “anti-American, pro-Islam” agenda, and was asked by a U.S. citizenship officer to drop his middle name of Mohamed. Others have endured far worse fates. Sweeping arrests following the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001 led to the incarceration and deportation of thousands of Arabs and Muslims, based almost solely on their national origin and immigration status. The NYPD, with help from the CIA, has aggressively spied on Muslims in the New York area as they go about their ordinary lives, from noting where they get their hair cut to eavesdropping on conversations in cafés. In This Muslim American Life, Moustafa Bayoumi reveals what the War on Terror looks like from the vantage point of Muslim Americans, highlighting the profound effect this surveillance has had on how they live their lives. To be a Muslim American today often means to exist in an absurd space between exotic and dangerous, victim and villain, simply because of the assumptions people carry about you. In gripping essays, Bayoumi exposes how contemporary politics, movies, novels, media experts and more have together produced a culture of fear and suspicion that not only willfully forgets the Muslim-American past, but also threatens all of our civil liberties in the present.
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The Making of the Mexican American Middle Class

Author: Jody Vallejo

Publisher: Stanford University Press

ISBN: 0804783160

Category: Social Science

Page: 248

View: 4124

Too frequently, the media and politicians cast Mexican immigrants as a threat to American society. Given America's increasing ethnic diversity and the large size of the Mexican-origin population, an investigation of how Mexican immigrants and their descendants achieve upward mobility and enter the middle class is long overdue. Barrios to Burbs offers a new understanding of the Mexican American experience. Vallejo explores the challenges that accompany rapid social mobility and examines a new indicator of incorporation, a familial obligation to "give back" in social and financial support. She investigates the salience of middle-class Mexican Americans' ethnic identification and details how relationships with poorer coethnics and affluent whites evolve as immigrants and their descendants move into traditionally white middle-class occupations. Disputing the argument that Mexican communities lack high quality resources and social capital that can help Mexican Americans incorporate into the middle class, Vallejo also examines civic participation in ethnic professional associations embedded in ethnic communities.
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Author: Vincent N. Parrillo

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1317261062

Category: Social Science

Page: 240

View: 2288

The updated and expanded fourth edition of Diversity in America addresses key controversial topics generating debate in US society today. The book answers these and many other questions by using history and sociology to shed light on socially constructed myths. Vincent N. Parrillo takes the reader through different American eras, beginning with the indigenous populations and continuing through colonial times, the industrial age, the information age and today. The book uses intergenerational comparisons and extrapolation of present trends into future probabilities to offer the reader a holistic analytic commentary to provide additional helpful insights and understanding.
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Love, Literature, and a Black Man's Escape from the Crowd

Author: Thomas Chatterton Williams

Publisher: Penguin

ISBN: 1101404345

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 240

View: 9506

A pitch-perfect account of how hip-hop culture drew in the author and how his father drew him out again-with love, perseverance, and fifteen thousand books. Into Williams's childhood home-a one-story ranch house-his father crammed more books than the local library could hold. "Pappy" used some of these volumes to run an academic prep service; the rest he used in his unending pursuit of wisdom. His son's pursuits were quite different-"money, hoes, and clothes." The teenage Williams wore Medusa- faced Versace sunglasses and a hefty gold medallion, dumbed down and thugged up his speech, and did whatever else he could to fit into the intoxicating hip-hop culture that surrounded him. Like all his friends, he knew exactly where he was the day Biggie Smalls died, he could recite the lyrics to any Nas or Tupac song, and he kept his woman in line, with force if necessary. But Pappy, who grew up in the segregated South and hid in closets so he could read Aesop and Plato, had a different destiny in mind for his son. For years, Williams managed to juggle two disparate lifestyles- "keeping it real" in his friends' eyes and studying for the SATs under his father's strict tutelage. As college approached and the stakes of the thug lifestyle escalated, the revolving door between Williams's street life and home life threatened to spin out of control. Ultimately, Williams would have to decide between hip-hop and his future. Would he choose "street dreams" or a radically different dream- the one Martin Luther King spoke of or the one Pappy held out to him now? Williams is the first of his generation to measure the seductive power of hip-hop against its restrictive worldview, which ultimately leaves those who live it powerless. Losing My Cool portrays the allure and the danger of hip-hop culture like no book has before. Even more remarkably, Williams evokes the subtle salvation that literature offers and recounts with breathtaking clarity a burgeoning bond between father and son. Watch a Video
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The Case for a Single Democratic State in Palestine

Author: Ali Abunimah

Publisher: Haymarket Books

ISBN: 1608463478

Category: History

Page: 224

View: 8485

Efforts to achieve a "two-state solution" have finally collapsed, and the struggle for justice in Palestine is at a crossroads. As Israeli society lurches toward greater extremism, many ask where the struggle is headed. This book offers a clear analysis of this crossroads moment and looks forward with urgency down the path to a more hopeful future.
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Travels Through America's Arab and Islamic Roots

Author: Jonathan Curiel

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: History

Page: 246

View: 2243

A lighthearted exploration of the influence of Arab and Islamic traditions in America explores the vital contributions they have made to American culture in spite of strong anti-Muslim prejudices, in an account that illuminates the presence of Arab and Islamic culture in American music, cuisines, and cities. 25,000 first printing.
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America's Invisible Middle Eastern Minority

Author: John Tehranian

Publisher: NYU Press

ISBN: 0814783066

Category: Law

Page: 246

View: 7265

Middle Easterners: Sometimes White, Sometimes Not - an article by John Tehranian The Middle Eastern question lies at the heart of the most pressing issues of our time: the war in Iraq and on terrorism, the growing tension between preservation of our national security and protection of our civil rights, and the debate over immigration, assimilation, and our national identity. Yet paradoxically, little attention is focused on our domestic Middle Eastern population and its place in American society. Unlike many other racial minorities in our country, Middle Eastern Americans have faced rising, rather than diminishing, degrees of discrimination over time; a fact highlighted by recent targeted immigration policies, racial profiling, a war on terrorism with a decided racialist bent, and growing rates of job discrimination and hate crime. Oddly enough, however, Middle Eastern Americans are not even considered a minority in official government data. Instead, they are deemed white by law. In Whitewashed, John Tehranian combines his own personal experiences as an Iranian American with an expert’s analysis of current events, legal trends, and critical theory to analyze this bizarre Catch-22 of Middle Eastern racial classification. He explains how American constructions of Middle Eastern racial identity have changed over the last two centuries, paying particular attention to the shift in perceptions of the Middle Easterner from friendly foreigner to enemy alien, a trend accelerated by the tragic events of 9/11. Focusing on the contemporary immigration debate, the war on terrorism, media portrayals of Middle Easterners, and the processes of creating racial stereotypes, Tehranian argues that, despite its many successes, the modern civil rights movement has not done enough to protect the liberties of Middle Eastern Americans. By following how concepts of whiteness have transformed over time, Whitewashed forces readers to rethink and question some of their most deeply held assumptions about race in American society.
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Author: Elizabeth Cook-Lynn

Publisher: MSU Press

ISBN: 1628950250

Category: Fiction

Page: 130

View: 6886

From one of the writers of the twentieth-century Native American Literary Renaissance comes a remarkable tale about how to acknowledge the past and take a chance on the future. Rooted in tribal-world consciousness, That Guy Wolf Dancing is the story of a young tribal wolf-man becoming a part of his not-sonatural world of non-tribal people. Twenty-something Philip Big Pipe disappears from an unsettled life he can hardly tolerate and ends up in an off-reservation town. When he leaves, he doesn’t tell anyone where he is going or what his plans, if he has any, might be. Having never taken himself too seriously, he now faces a world that feels very foreign to him. As he struggles to adapt to the modern universe, Philip, ever a “wolf dancer,” must improvise, this time to a sound others provide for him. Like the wolf, Philip sometimes feels hunted, outrun, verging on extinction. Only by moving rhythmically in a dissident, dangerous, and iconic world can Philip Big Pipe let go of the past and craft a new future.
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How Hollywood Vilifies a People

Author: Jack Shaheen

Publisher: Interlink Publishing

ISBN: 1623710065

Category: Social Science

Page: 617

View: 7418

A groundbreaking book that dissects a slanderous history dating from cinema's earliest days to contemporary Hollywood blockbusters that feature machine-gun wielding and bomb-blowing ""evil"" ArabsAward-winning film authority Jack G. Shaheen, noting that only Native Americans have been more relentlessly smeared on the silver screen, painstakingly makes his case that ""Arab"" has remained Hollywood's shameless shorthand for ""bad guy, "" long after the movie industry has shifted its portrayal of other minority groups. In this comprehensive study of over one thousand films, arranged a.
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Gender, Violence, & Belonging

Author: Rabab Abdulhadi,Evelyn Alsultany,Nadine Christine Naber

Publisher: Syracuse University Press

ISBN: 0815651236

Category: Arab American women

Page: 389

View: 3220

Evelyn Alsultany is assistant professor in the Program in American Culture at the University of Michigan. Her articles have appeared in American Quarterly, Race and Arab Americans Before and After 9/11, and The Arab Diaspora. She is the author of Arabs and Muslims in the Media Post 9/11.
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Fugitive Life in an American City

Author: Alice Goffman

Publisher: Picador

ISBN: 1250065674

Category: Social Science

Page: 304

View: 9412

A RIVETING, GROUNDBREAKING ACCOUNT OF HOW THE WAR ON CRIME HAS TORN APART INNER-CITY COMMUNITIES Forty years in, the tough on crime turn in American politics has spurred a prison boom of historic proportions that disproportionately affects Black communities. It has also torn at the lives of those on the outside. As arrest quotas and high tech surveillance criminalize entire blocks, a climate of fear and suspicion pervades daily life, not only for young men entangled in the legal system, but for their family members and working neighbors. Alice Goffman spent six years in one Philadelphia neighborhood, documenting the routine stops, searches, raids, and beatings that young men navigate as they come of age. In the course of her research, she became roommates with Mike and Chuck, two friends trying to make ends meet between low wage jobs and the drug trade. Like many in the neighborhood, Mike and Chuck were caught up in a cycle of court cases, probation sentences, and low level warrants, with no clear way out. We observe their girlfriends and mothers enduring raids and interrogations, "clean" residents struggling to go to school and work every day as the cops chase down neighbors in the streets, and others eking out a living by providing clean urine, fake documents, and off the books medical care. This fugitive world is the hidden counterpoint to mass incarceration, the grim underside of our nation's social experiment in punishing Black men and their families. While recognizing the drug trade's damage, On The Run reveals a justice system gone awry: it is an exemplary work of scholarship highlighting the failures of the War on Crime, and a compassionate chronicle of the families caught in the midst of it. "A remarkable feat of reporting . . . The level of detail in this book and Goffman's ability to understand her subjects' motivations are astonishing—and riveting."—The New York Times Book Review
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Gender, Cultural Politics, and Activism

Author: Nadine Naber

Publisher: NYU Press

ISBN: 081475886X

Category: History

Page: 310

View: 3401

Saudi Arabia in the Balance brings together today’s leading scholars in the field to investigate the domestic, regional, and international affairs of a Kingdom whose policies have so far eluded the outside world. With the passing of King Fahd and the installation of King Abdullah, a contemporary understanding of Saudi Arabia is essential as the Kingdom enters a new era of leadership and particularly when many Saudis themselves are increasingly debating, and actively shaping, the future direction of domestic and foreign affairs. Each of the essays, framed in the aftermath of 9/11 and the 2003 invasion of Iraq, offers a systematic perspective into the country’s political and economic realities as well as the tension between its regional and global roles. Important topics covered include U.S. and Saudi relations; Saudi oil policy; the Islamist threat to the monarchy regime; educational opportunities; the domestic rise of liberal opposition; economic reform; the role of the royal family; and the country's foreign relations in a changing international world. Contributors: Paul Aarts, Madawi Al-Rasheed, Rachel Bronson, Iris Glosemeyer, Steffen Hertog, Yossi Kostiner, Stéphane Lacroix, Giacomo Luciani, Monica Malik, Roel Meijer, Tim Niblock, Gerd Nonneman, Michaela Prokop, Abdulaziz Sager, Guido Steinberg
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Living in Bootstrap America

Author: Linda Tirado

Publisher: Penguin

ISBN: 0425277976

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 240

View: 494

Originally published in hardcover in 2014 by G.P. Putnam's Sons.
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