The Major Works

Author: Robert Browning

Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA

ISBN: 9780192806260

Category: Poetry

Page: 828

View: 983

A comprehensive selection includes over eighty shorter poems, the complete text of many longer poems, three books, critical writing, and correspondence.
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Author: Pindar,Stephen Instone

Publisher: OUP Oxford

ISBN: 0192805533

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 186

View: 6216

The Greek poet Pindar (c. 518-428 BC) composed victory odes for winners in the ancient Games, including the Olympics. The Odes contain versions of some of the best known Greek myths and are also a valuable source for Greek religion and ethics. Verity's lucid translations are complemented by insights into competition, myth, and meaning. - ;'we can speak of no greater contest than Olympia' The Greek poet Pindar (c. 518-428 BC) composed victory odes for winners in the ancient Games, including the Olympics. He celebrated the victories of athletes competing in foot races, horse races, boxing, wrestling, all-in fighting and the pentathlon, and his Odes are fascinating not only for their poetic qualities, but for what they tell us about the Games. Pindar praises the victor by comparing him to mythical heroes and the gods, but also reminds the athlete of his human limitations. The Odes contain versions of some of the best known Greek myths, such as Jason and the Argonauts, and Perseus and Medusa, and are a valuable source for Greek religion and ethics. Pindar's startling use of language - striking metaphors, bold syntax, enigmatic expressions - makes reading his poetry a uniquely rewarding experience. Anthony Verity's lucid translations are complemented by an introduction and notes that provide insight into competition, myth, and meaning. -
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Author: Marinos Yeroulanos

Publisher: I.B.Tauris

ISBN: 1784534927

Category: History

Page: 897

View: 2158

A 2016 Book of the Year, BBC History Magazine Human wisdom is of little or no value', wrote Plato in his Apology. And yet the ancient Greeks, including Plato himself, more than any other people of antiquity were fascinated by the pursuit of the wisdom they called philosophia. That search for knowledge involved an extensive use of maxims and quotations, as we can see from those expressions of Homer prefaced by the phrase 'as people say'. Homer, the Seven Sages and the Pre-Socratic philosophers are still extensively quoted in all the major western languages. Yet for all their popularity, until now there has been no single resource to which interested readers might turn. This unique reference book offers one of the most comprehensive selections of Greek quotations ever committed to print. With its English text matched by the original Greek, the volume collects 7500 entries, ranging from the archaic period to late antiquity, and across philosophy, drama, poetry, history, science and medicine, each indexed with key words to enable fast sourcing. Together, these selections provide an incomparable insight into the glories of Greek civilization.
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Author: John Milton

Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA

ISBN: 9780192804099

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 966

View: 5187

This authoritative edition was originally published in the acclaimed Oxford Authors series under the general editorship of Frank Kermode. It brings together a unique combination of Milton's poetry and prose - all the English verse together with a generous selection from the major prosewritings - to give the essence of his work and thinking.Milton's influence on English poetry and criticism has been incalculable, and this edition covers the full range of his poetic and political output. It includes Paradise Lost, Paradise Regained, and Samson Agonistes as well as major prose works such as Areopagitica and The Tenure of Kings andMagistrates. As well as all the English and Italian verse, the volume includes most of the Latin and Greek verse in parallel translation. Spelling has been modernized, and the poems are arranged in order of publication, essential to an understanding of the progress of Milton's career in relationto the political and religious upheavals of his time. The extensive notes cover syntax, vocabulary, historical context, and biblical and classical allusions. The introduction traces both Milton's changing conception of his own vocation, and the critical reception his work has received over the pastfour centuries.
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Author: Theocritus,Anthony Verity,Richard L. Hunter

Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA

ISBN: 9780192839848

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 114

View: 9539

Eucritus and I and pretty Amyntas turned aside To the farm of Phrasidamus, where we sank down With pleasure on deep-piled couches of sweet rushes, And vine leaves freshly stripped from the bush.' The Greek poet Theocritus of Syracuse (first half of the third century BC) was the inventor of 'bucolic' poetry. These vignettes of country life, centred on competitions in song and love, are the foundational poems of the western pastoral tradition. They were the principal model for Virgil in the Eclogues and their influence can be seen in the work of Petrarch and Milton. Although it is the pastoral poems for which he is chiefly famous, Theocritus also wrote hymns to the gods, brilliant mime depictions of everyday life, short narrative epics, epigrams, and encomia of the powerful. The great variety of his poems illustrates the rich and flourishing poetic culture of what was a golden age for Greek poetry.
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Author: Alfred Tennyson

Publisher: OUP Oxford

ISBN: 9780199572762

Category: Poetry

Page: 656

View: 4842

This edition, previously published in the Oxford Authors series, includes all Tennyson's classic poems and The Princess, In Memoriam, Maud, Enoch Arden in full, as well as several of the Idylls of the King. It includes letters and extracts from Hallam Tennyson's Memoir of his father.
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Author: Emma Stafford

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1136519270

Category: History

Page: 312

View: 2526

There is more material available on Herakles than any other Greek god or hero. His story has many more episodes than those of other heroes, concerning his life and death as well as his battles with myriad monsters and other opponents. In literature, he appears in our earliest Greek epic and lyric poetry, is reinvented for the tragic and comic stage, and later finds his way into such unlikely areas as philosophical writing and love poetry. In art, his exploits are amongst the earliest identifiable mythological scenes, and his easily-recognisable figure with lionskin and club was a familiar sight throughout antiquity in sculpture, vase-painting and other media. He was held up as an ancestor and role-model for both Greek and Roman rulers, and widely worshipped as a god, his unusual status as a hero-god being reinforced by the story of his apotheosis. Often referred to by his Roman name Hercules, he has continued to fascinate writers and artists right up to the present day. In Herakles, Emma Stafford has successfully tackled the ‘Herculean task’ of surveying both the ancient sources and the extensive modern scholarship in order to present a hugely accessible account of this important mythical figure. Covering both Greek and Roman material, the book highlights areas of consensus and dissent, indicating avenues for further study on both details and broader issues. Easy to read, Herakles is perfectly suited to students of classics and related disciplines, and of interest to anyone looking for an insight into ancient Greece’s most popular hero.
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Author: Virgil

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category:

Page: 48

View: 6979

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Author: David Kennedy

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1134209061

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 176

View: 7023

Grief and mourning are generally considered to be private, yet universal instincts. But in a media age of televised funerals and visible bereavement, elegies are increasingly significant and open to public scrutiny. Providing an overview of the history of the term and the different ways in which it is used, David Kennedy: outlines the origins of elegy, and the characteristics of the genre examines the psychology and cultural background underlying works of mourning explores how the modern elegy has evolved, and how it differs from ‘canonical elegy’, also looking at female elegists and feminist readings considers the elegy in the light of writing by theorists such as Jacques Derrida and Catherine Waldby looks at the elegy in contemporary writing, and particularly at how it has emerged and been adapted as a response to terrorist attacks such as 9/11. Emphasising and explaining the significance of elegy today, this illuminating guide to an emotive literary genre will be of interest to students of literature, media and culture.
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Didactic Hymnody Among Greeks, Romans, Jews, and Christians

Author: Matthew E. Gordley

Publisher: Mohr Siebeck

ISBN: 9783161507229

Category: Religion

Page: 445

View: 8712

While scholars of antiquity have long spoken of didactic hymns, no single volume has defined or explored this phenomenon across cultural boundaries in antiquity. In this monograph Matthew E. Gordley provides a broad definition of didactic hymnody and examines how didactic hymns functioned at the intersection of historical circumstances and the needs of a given community to perceive itself and its place in the cosmos and to respond accordingly. Comparing the use of didactic hymnody in a variety of traditions, this study illuminates the multifaceted ways that ancient hymns and psalms contributed to processes of communal formation among the human audiences that participated in the praise either as hearers or active participants. The author finds that in Greek, Roman, Jewish, and Christian contexts, many hymns and prayers served a didactic role fostering the ongoing development of a sense of identity within particular communities.
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The Winchester Manuscript

Author: Sir Thomas Malory,Helen Cooper

Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA

ISBN: 9780192824202

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 576

View: 4803

Presents the epic story of King Arthur, his Knights of the Round Table, the sword of Excalibur, and his tragic and poetic death
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Author: N.A

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1107480345

Category: History

Page: 186

View: 9237

Originally published in 1953, this book provides a series of English translations from ancient Greek bucolic poetry by Theocritus, Moschus and Bion. A detailed introduction is included, with information on each of the poets. Textual notes are incorporated throughout. This book will be of value to anyone with an interest in ancient Greek literature, literary criticism and bucolic poetry.
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Idylls 1, 3, 4, 6, 7, 10, 11 and 13

Author: Theocritus,Richard L. Hunter

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9780521574204

Category: History

Page: 308

View: 8762

This is the first full-scale commentary on poems by Theocritus since Gow's edition of 1950, and the first to exploit the recent revolution in the study of Hellenistic and Roman poetry; the poems included in this volume (Idylls 1, 3, 4, 6, 7, 10, 11 and 13) are principally the bucolic poems which, through their influence on Virgil, established the Western pastoral tradition. The focus of the commentary is literary - both on how Theocritus exploited the classical heritage for a new type of poetry, and on what that poetry meant in the third century BC. The commentary, together with the introductory essays to each poem, makes a major contribution to the understanding of this extraordinary poetic form. The Introduction explores the meaning of 'bucolic', the presentation of a stylised countryside, the importance of eros in the bucolic world, and Theocritus' verbal and metrical style.
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Author: Homer,,Anthony Verity,Barbara Graziosi

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0199235481

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 470

View: 8768

The Iliad tells the story of Greek warrior Achilles' great anger and the tragic death of Hector during the Trojan War. Its epic sweep has gripped generations of readers, and this new translation is elegant and accurate, respecting the original line numbers, and accompanied by authoritative editorial material.
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Explorations in a Scholarly Genre

Author: Christina S. Kraus,Christopher Stray

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0199688982

Category: Classical languages

Page: 592

View: 6419

This rich collection of essays by an international group of scholars explores commentaries in many different languages on ancient Latin and Greek texts. The commentaries discussed range from the ancient world to the twentieth century. The volume pays particular attention to individual commentaries, national traditions of commentary, the part played by commentaries in the reception of classical texts, and the role of printing and publishing.
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Theocritus, Bion and Moschus

Author: Theocritus,Bion,Moschus

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9780674990319

Category: Greek poetry

Page: 526

View: 8385

Theocritus (third century BCE) was the founder of bucolic poetry. The extant poems of Moschus (second century BCE) and Bion (probably second and first centuries BCE) are not really bucolic, but Bionâe(tm)s Lament for Adonis is floridly brilliant. Pattern poems are found in the Greek Anthology, a work of many centuries.
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A Novel

Author: Annie Proulx

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN: 9780743519809

Category: Fiction

Page: 368

View: 6086

Winner of the Pulitzer Prize, Annie Proulx’s The Shipping News is a vigorous, darkly comic, and at times magical portrait of the contemporary North American family. Quoyle, a third-rate newspaper hack, with a “head shaped like a crenshaw, no neck, reddish hair...features as bunched as kissed fingertips,” is wrenched violently out of his workaday life when his two-timing wife meets her just desserts. An aunt convinces Quoyle and his two emotionally disturbed daughters to return with her to the starkly beautiful coastal landscape of their ancestral home in Newfoundland. Here, on desolate Quoyle’s Point, in a house empty except for a few mementos of the family’s unsavory past, the battered members of three generations try to cobble up new lives. Newfoundland is a country of coast and cove where the mercury rarely rises above seventy degrees, the local culinary delicacy is cod cheeks, and it’s easier to travel by boat and snowmobile than on anything with wheels. In this harsh place of cruel storms, a collapsing fishery, and chronic unemployment, the aunt sets up as a yacht upholsterer in nearby Killick-Claw, and Quoyle finds a job reporting the shipping news for the local weekly, the Gammy Bird (a paper that specializes in sexual-abuse stories and grisly photos of car accidents). As the long winter closes its jaws of ice, each of the Quoyles confronts private demons, reels from catastrophe to minor triumph—in the company of the obsequious Mavis Bangs; Diddy Shovel the strongman; drowned Herald Prowse; cane-twirling Beety; Nutbeem, who steals foreign news from the radio; a demented cousin the aunt refuses to recognize; the much-zippered Alvin Yark; silent Wavey; and old Billy Pretty, with his bag of secrets. By the time of the spring storms Quoyle has learned how to gut cod, to escape from a pickle jar, and to tie a true lover’s knot.
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(selections)

Author: Alfred Tennyson Baron Tennyson

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Arthurian romances

Page: 233

View: 7062

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Author: Paul Alpers

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN: 0226015173

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 429

View: 2006

One of the enduring traditions of Western literary history, pastoral is often mischaracterized as a catchall for literature about rural themes and nature in general. In What Is Pastoral?, distinguished literary historian Paul Alpers argues that pastoral is based upon a fundamental fiction—that the lives of shepherds or other socially humble figures represent the lives of human beings in general. Ranging from Virgil's Eclogues to Sarah Orne Jewett's The Country of the Pointed Firs, from Shakespeare and Cervantes to Hardy and Frost, this work brings the story of the pastoral tradition, previously limited to classical and Renaissance literature, into the twentieth century. Pastoral reemerges in this account not as a vehicle of nostalgia for some Golden Age, nor of escape to idyllic landscapes, but as a mode bearing witness to the possibilities and problems of human community and shared experience in the real world. A rich and engrossing book, What Is Pastoral? will soon take its place as the definitive study of pastoral literature. "Alpers succeeds brilliantly. . . . [He] offers . . . a wealth of new insight into the origins, development, and flowering of the pastoral."—Ann-Maria Contarino, Renaissance Quarterly
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