Organizational Aspects 27 BC-AD 235

Author: Alfred Michael Hirt

Publisher: OUP Oxford

ISBN: 0191614408

Category: History

Page: 568

View: 8023

The control over marble and metal resources was of major importance to the Roman Empire. The emperor's freedmen and slaves, officers and soldiers of the Roman army, equestrian officials, as well as convicts and free labour were seconded to mines and quarries throughout Rome's vast realm. Alfred Hirt's comprehensive study defines the organizational outlines and the internal structures of the mining and quarrying ventures under imperial control. The themes addressed include: challenges faced by those in charge of these extractive operations; the key figures, their subaltern personnel and their respective responsibilities; the role of the Roman army; the use of civilian partners in quarrying or mining ventures; and the position of the quarrying or mining organizations within the framework of the imperial administration.
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Author: Paul Erdkamp,Koenraad Verboven,Arjan Zuiderhoek

Publisher: OUP Oxford

ISBN: 0191044733

Category: History

Page: 440

View: 5982

Explanation of the success and failure of the Roman economy is one of the most important problems in economic history. As an economic system capable of sustaining high production and consumption levels, it was unparalleled until the early modern period. This volume focuses on how the institutional structure of the Roman Empire affected economic performance both positively and negatively. An international range of contributors offers a variety of approaches that together enhance our understanding of how different ownership rights and various modes of organization and exploitation facilitated or prevented the use of land and natural resources in the production process. Relying on a large array of resources - literary, legal, epigraphic, papyrological, numismatic, and archaeological - chapters address key questions regarding the foundations of the Roman Empire's economic system. Questions of growth, concentration and legal status of property (private, public, or imperial), the role of the state, content and limitations of rights of ownership, water rights and management, exploitation of indigenous populations, and many more receive new and original analyses that make this book a significant step forward to understanding what made the economic achievements of the Roman empire possible.
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Author: Penny MacGeorge

Publisher: OUP Oxford

ISBN: 0191530913

Category: History

Page: 368

View: 3189

Late Roman Warlords reconstructs the careers of some of the men who shaped (and were shaped by) the last quarter century of the Western Empire. There is a need for a new investigation of these warlords based on primary sources and including recent historical debates and theories. The difficult sources for this period have been analysed (and translated as necessary) to produce a chronological account, and relevant archaeological and numismatic evidence has been utilised. An overview of earlier warlords, including Aetius, is followed by three studies of individual warlords and the regions they dominated. The first covers Dalmatia and Marcellinus, its ruler during the 450s and 460s. A major theme is the question of Marcellinus' western or eastern affiliations: using an often-ignored Greek source, Penny MacGeorge suggests a new interpretation. The second part is concerned with the Gallic general Aegidius and his son Syagrius, who ruled in northern Gaul, probably from Soissons. This extends to AD 486 (well after the fall of the Western Empire). The problem of the existence or non-existence of a 'kingdom of Soissons' is discussed, introducing evidence from the Merovingian period, and a solution put forward. This section also looks at how the political situation in northern Gaul might throw light on contemporary post-Roman Britain. The third study is of the barbarian patrician Ricimer, defender of Italy, and his successors (the Burgundian prince Gundobad and Orestes, a former employee of Attila) down to the coup of 476 by which Odovacer became the first barbarian king of Italy. This includes discussion of the character and motivation of Ricimer, particularly in relation to the emperors he promoted and destroyed, and of how historians' assessments of him have changed over time.
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Author: Ben Russell

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0199656398

Category: Art

Page: 449

View: 9333

Russell provides an examination of the production, distribution, and use of carved stone objects in the Roman world. Focusing on the market for stone and its supply, he offers an assessment of the practicalities of stone transport and how the relationship between producer and customer functioned even over considerable distances.
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A Study of Economics and Administration in a Roman Province

Author: Colin Adams

Publisher: Oxford University Press on Demand

ISBN: 0199203970

Category: History

Page: 331

View: 2496

His study makes a significant contribution to our understanding of the ancient economy and of the workings of Roman provincial government in general."--BOOK JACKET.
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Cult and Community in Republican Rome

Author: Anna Clark

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0199226822

Category: History

Page: 376

View: 4695

Anna J. Clark explores 'divine qualities', such as Concord, Faith, Hope, and Clemency, to show how they reveal an aspect of how Romans thought about themselves. Clark draws on a wide range of evidence (literature, drama, coins, architecture, inscriptions and graffiti) to show that these qualities were relevant to a wide range of people.
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An English Translation, with Introduction and Notes

Author: N.A

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1139952498

Category: History

Page: N.A

View: 2674

The Geography of Strabo is the only surviving work of its type in Greek literature, and the major source for the history of Greek scholarship on geography and the formative processes of the earth. In addition, this lengthy and complex work contains a vast amount of information on other topics, including the journey of Alexander the Great, cultic history, the history of the eastern Mediterranean in the first century BC, and women's history. Modern knowledge of seminal geographical authors such as Eratosthenes and Hipparchos relies almost totally on Strabo's use of them. This is the first complete English translation in nearly a century, and the first to make use of recent scholarship on the Greek text itself and on the history of geography. The translation is supplemented by a detailed discussion of Strabo's life and his purpose in writing the Geography, as well as the sources that he used.
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The Making of Asceticism in Late Antiquity

Author: Susanna Elm

Publisher: Clarendon Press

ISBN: 9780191591631

Category: Asceticism

Page: 460

View: 2318

Many of the institutions fundamental to the role of men and women in society today were formed in late antiquity. This path-breaking study offers a comprehensive look at how Christian women of this time initiated alternative, ascetic ways of living, both with and without men. The author studies how these practices were institutionalized, and why later they were either eliminated or transformed by a new Christian Roman elite of men we now think of as the founding fathers of monasticism. - ;Situated in a period that witnessed the genesis of institutions fundamental to this day, this path-breaking study offers a comprehensive look at how ancient Christian women initiated ascetic ways of living, and how these practices were then institutionalized. Using the organization of female asceticism in Asia Minor and Egypt as a lever, the author demonstrates that - in direct contrast to later conceptions - asceticism began primarly as an urban movement. Crucially, it also originated with men and women living together, varying the model of the family. The book then traces how, in the course of the fourth century, these early organizational forms underwent a transformation. Concurrent with the doctrinal struggles to redefine the Trinity, and with the formation of a new Christian --eacute--;lite, men such as Basil of Caesarea changed the institutional configuration of ascetic life in common: they emphasized the segregation of the sexes, and the supremacy of the rural over urban models. At the same time, ascetics became clerics, who increasingly used female saints as symbols for the role of the new ecclesiastical elite. Earlier, more varied models of ascetic life were either silenced or condemned as heretical; and those who had been in fact their reformers became known as the founding fathers of monasticism. -
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Insularity, Networks, the Athenian Empire, and the Aegean World

Author: Christy Constantakopoulou

Publisher: OUP Oxford

ISBN: 0191615455

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 348

View: 2987

Christy Constantakopoulou examines the history of the Aegean islands and changing concepts of insularity, with particular emphasis on the fifth century BC. Islands are a prominent feature of the Aegean landscape, and this inevitably created a variety of different (and sometimes contradictory) perceptions of insularity in classical Greek thought. Geographic analysis of insularity emphasizes the interplay between island isolation and island interaction, but the predominance of islands in the Aegean sea made island isolation almost impossible. Rather, island connectivity was an important feature of the history of the Aegean and was expressed on many levels. Constantakopoulou investigates island interaction in two prominent areas, religion and imperial politics, examining both the religious networks located on islands in the ancient Greek world and the impact of imperial politics on the Aegean islands during the fifth century.
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Exile, the Polis, and Political Thought, C. 404-146 BC

Author: Benjamin Gray

Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA

ISBN: 0198729774

Category: History

Page: 452

View: 1277

This volume offers a history of the role of exile in the Greek city-state in the period c. 404-146 BC, from the end of the Peloponnesian War to the Roman conquest of the Greek world. It is structured thematically, considering in turn reintegration of exiles, laws on exile, expulsion through the courts, expulsion through civil war, and the identities and ideologies of exiles themselves.
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Author: Adrian Kelly

Publisher: Oxford University Press on Demand

ISBN: 0199203555

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 515

View: 6474

Adrian Kelly shows that familiarity with the oral background of Homeric poetry is vital for a proper appreciation of Homeric narrative. He presents the kind of information a modern reader requires to become as fluent in traditional epic poetry as an original ancient audience.
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Author: Idatius (Bishop of Chaves),Richard W. Burgess

Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA

ISBN: N.A

Category: History

Page: 270

View: 5471

This book contains new critical editions of two early and important examples of the most popular Late Roman historical genres. The two texts, Chronicle of Hydatius and Consularia Constantinopolitana, provide an indispensable contemporary account of the fourth century A.D. These editions, based on the first ever examination of all surviving manuscripts, are provided with detailed introductions and appendices, and include the first English translation of Hydatius.
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Author: John Peter Oleson

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0199734852

Category: History

Page: 865

View: 4623

Nearly every aspect of daily life in the Mediterranean world and Europe during the florescence of the Greek and Roman cultures is relevant to engineering and technology. This text highlights the accomplishments of the ancient societies, the research problems, and stimulates further progress in the history of ancient technology.
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Author: Daniel Ogden

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780198150190

Category: History

Page: 430

View: 5329

Societies are defined at their margins. In the ancient Greek world bastards were often marginal, their affinities being with the female, the alien, the servile, the poor, and the sick. The study of bastardy in ancient Greece is therefore of an importance that goes far beyond the subject's intrinsic interest, and provides insights into the structure of Greek society as a whole. This is the first full-length book on the subject, and it reviews the major evidence from Athens, Sparta, Gortyn, and Hellenistic Egypt, as well as collating and analysing fragmentary evidence from the other Greek states. Dr Ogden shows how attitudes towards legitimacy differed across the various city states, and analyses their developments across time. He also advances new interpretations of more familiar problems of Athenian bastardy, such as Pericles' citizenship law. The book should interest historians of a wide range of social topics - from law and the economy to the study of women in antiquity and sexuality.
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How the Roman Military Built an Empire

Author: Simon Elliott

Publisher: Oxbow Books

ISBN: 1785706594

Category: History

Page: 224

View: 4928

The armed forces of Rome, particularly those of the later Republic and Principate, are rightly regarded as some of the finest military formations ever to engage in warfare. Less well known however is their use by the State as tools for such nonmilitary activities in political, economic and social contexts. In this capacity they were central instruments for the Emperor to ensure the smooth running of the Empire. In this book the use of the military for such non-conflict related duties is considered in detail for the first time. The first, and best known, is running the great construction projects of the Empire in their capacity as engineers. Next, the role of the Roman military in the running of industry across the Roman Empire is examined, particularly the mining and quarrying industries but also others. They also took part in agriculture, administered and policed the Empire, provided a firefighting resource and organized games in the arena. The soldiers of Rome really were the foundations on which the Roman Empire was constructed: they literally built an empire. Simon Elliott lifts the lid on this less well-known side to the Roman army, in an accessible narrative designed for a wide readership.
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Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece

Author: Barbara Kowalzig

Publisher: OUP Oxford

ISBN: N.A

Category: History

Page: 528

View: 6060

A new approach to an old question - the relationship between myth and ritual. Barbara Kowalzig shows how choral performances of myth and ritual, taking place all over the ancient Greek world in the early fifth century BC, helped to effect social and political change in their own time.
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Author: Hugh Elton

Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA

ISBN: N.A

Category: History

Page: 312

View: 5346

Despite the importance of warfare in the collapse of the Roman Empire, this is the only comprehensive study of the subject available. Hugh Elton discusses the practice of warfare in Europe, from both Roman and barbarian perspectives, in the late fourth and early fifth centuries. He analyzes the military practices and capabilities of the Romans and their northern enemies at political, strategic, operational, and tactical levels, and covers civil wars, sieges, and naval warfare.
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Winged Words

Author: Jeremy Mynott

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0191022721

Category: History

Page: 528

View: 9887

Birds pervaded the ancient world, impressing their physical presence on the daily experience and imaginations of ordinary people and figuring prominently in literature and art. They provided a fertile source of symbols and stories in myths and folklore and were central to the ancient rituals of augury and divination. Jeremy Mynott's Birds in the Ancient World illustrates the many different roles birds played in culture: as indicators of time, weather and the seasons; as a resource for hunting, eating, medicine and farming; as domestic pets and entertainments; and as omens and intermediaries between the gods and humankind. We learn how birds were perceived - through quotations from well over a hundred classical Greek and Roman authors, all of them translated freshly into English, through nearly 100 illustrations from ancient wall-paintings, pottery and mosaics, and through selections from early scientific writings, and many anecdotes and descriptions from works of history, geography and travel. Jeremy Mynott acts as a stimulating guide to this rich and fascinating material, using birds as a prism through which to explore both the similarities and the often surprising differences between ancient conceptions of the natural world and our own. His book is an original contribution to the flourishing interest in the cultural history of birds and to our understanding of the ancient cultures in which birds played such a prominent part.
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City Planning and Administration

Author: O. F. Robinson

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 113484493X

Category: History

Page: 272

View: 8610

Rome was a huge city. Running it required not only public works and services but also specialised law. This innovative work traces the development of that law and system in the main areas of administration. The book incorporates and develops previous historical and topographical works by relating their findings to the Roman legal framework, building up a portrait of public administration, unusually comprehensive for the ancient world.
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Biography and Identity

Author: Adam Rogers

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1317633849

Category: Social Science

Page: 244

View: 1051

Within the colonial history of the British Empire there are difficulties in reconstructing the lives of people that came from very different traditions of experience. The Archaeology of Roman Britain argues that a similar critical approach to the lives of people in Roman Britain needs to be developed, not only for the study of the local population but also those coming into Britain from elsewhere in the Empire who developed distinctive colonial lives. This critical, biographical approach can be extended and applied to places, structures, and things which developed in these provincial contexts as they were used and experienced over time. This book uniquely combines the study of all of these elements to access the character of Roman Britain and the lives, experiences, and identities of people living there through four centuries of occupation. Drawing on the concept of the biography and using it as an analytical tool, author Adam Rogers situates the archaeological material of Roman Britain within the within the political, geographical, and temporal context of the Roman Empire. This study will be of interest to scholars of Roman archaeology, as well as those working in biographical themes, issues of colonialism, identity, ancient history, and classics.
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