Author: Jill Harries

Publisher: Edinburgh University Press

ISBN: 0748653953

Category: History

Page: 384

View: 9959

This book is about the reinvention of the Roman Empire during the eighty years between the accession of Diocletian and the death of Julian.
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The Transformation of Ancient Rome

Author: A. D. Lee

Publisher: Edinburgh University Press

ISBN: 0748631755

Category: History

Page: 360

View: 3355

Between the deaths of the Emperors Julian (363) and Justinian (565), the Roman Empire underwent momentous changes. Most obviously, control of the west was lost to barbarian groups during the fifth century, and although parts were recovered by Justinian, the empire's centre of gravity shifted irrevocably to the east, with its focal point now the city of Constantinople. Equally important was the increasing dominance of Christianity not only in religious life, but also in politics, society and culture. Doug Lee charts these and other significant developments which contributed to the transformation of ancient Rome and its empire into Byzantium and the early medieval west. By emphasising the resilience of the east during late antiquity and the continuing vitality of urban life and the economy, this volume offers an alternative perspective to the traditional paradigm of decline and fall.
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The Critical Century

Author: Clifford Ando

Publisher: Edinburgh University Press

ISBN: 0748629203

Category: History

Page: 272

View: 1063

The Roman empire during the period framed by the accession of Septimus Severus in 193 and the rise of Diocletian in 284 has conventionally been regarded as one of 'crisis'. Between 235 and 284, at least eighteen men held the throne of the empire, for an average of less than three years, a reckoning which does not take into account all the relatives and lieutenants with whom those men shared power. Compared to the century between the accession of Nerva and the death of Commodus, this appears to be a period of near unintelligibility. The middle of the century also witnessed catastrophic, if temporary, ruptures in the territorial integrity of the empire. At slightly different times, large portions of the eastern and western halves of the empire passed under the control of powers and principalities who assumed the mantle of Roman government and exercised meaningful and legitimate juridical, political and military power over millions. The success and longevity of those political formations reflected local responses to the collapse of Roman governmental power in the face of extraordinary pressure on its borders. Even those regions that remained Roman were subjected to depredation and pillage by invading armies. The Roman peace, which had become in the last instance the justification for empire, had been shattered. In this pioneering history Clifford Ando describes and integrates the contrasting histories of different parts of the empire and assesses the impacts of administrative, political and religious change.
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Author: William Lewis Leadbetter

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1135261326

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 296

View: 7713

Drawing from a variety of sources - literary, visual, archaeological; papyri, inscriptions and coins – the author studies the nature of Diocletian’s imperial strategy, his wars, his religious views and his abdication. The author also examines Galerius’ endeavour to take control of Diocletian’s empire, his failures and successes, against the backdrop of Constantine’s remorseless drive to power. The first comprehensive study of the Emperor Galerius, this book offers an innovative analysis of his reign as both Caesar and Augustus, using his changing relationship with Diocletian as the principal key to unlock the complex imperial politics of the period.
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Conquest and Crisis

Author: Catherine Steel

Publisher: Edinburgh University Press

ISBN: 0748629025

Category: History

Page: 320

View: 9128

In 146 BC the armies of Rome destroyed Carthage and emerged as the decisive victors of the Third Punic War. The Carthaginian population was sold and its territory became the Roman province of Africa. In the same year and on the other side of the Mediterranean Roman troops sacked Corinth, the final blow in the defeat of the Achaean conspiracy: thereafter Greece was effectively administered by Rome. Rome was now supreme in Italy, the Balkans, Greece, Macedonia, Sicily, and North Africa, and its power and influence were advancing in all directions. However, not all was well. The unchecked seizure of huge tracts of land in Italy and its farming by vast numbers of newly imported slaves allowed an elite of usually absentee landlords to amass enormous and conspicuous fortunes. Insecurity and resentment fed the gulf between rich and poor in Rome and erupted in a series of violent upheavals in the politics and institutions of the Republic. These were exacerbated by slave revolts and invasions from the east.
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Author: Nathan Rosenstein

Publisher: Edinburgh University Press

ISBN: 0748650814

Category: History

Page: 312

View: 5496

Nathan Rosenstein charts Rome's incredible journey and command of the Mediterranean over the course of the third and second centuries BC.
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Imperial Pronouncements and Government, AD 284-324

Author: Simon Corcoran

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780198153047

Category: History

Page: 421

View: 8992

Simon Corcoran examines the government of the Roman empire at an important period of administrative and religious change. Drawing together material from a wide variety of sources, the book studies the vast range of documents issued by the emperors and their officials, and assesses how effectively the machinery of government matched imperial ambitions. The additional notes in this revised edition of the hardback contain details of recent epigraphic work and discoveries, especially from Ephesus, as well as an account of a long ignored rescript of Diocletian.
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Author: Olivier Hekster

Publisher: Edinburgh University Press

ISBN: 0748629920

Category: History

Page: 208

View: 7872

This was a time of civil war, anarchy, intrigue, and assassination.Between 193 and 284 the Roman Empire knew more than twenty-five emperors, and an equal number of usurpers. All of them had some measure of success, several of them often ruling different parts of the Empire at the same time. Rome's traditional political institutions slid into vacuity and armies became the Empire's most powerful institutions, proclaiming their own imperial champions and deposing those they held to be incompetent.Yet despite widespread contemporary dismay at such weak government this period was also one in which the boundaries of the Empire remained fairly stable; the rights and privileges of Roman citizenship were extended equally to all free citizens of the Empire; in several regions the economy remained robust in the face of rampant inflation; and literary culture, philosophy, and legal theory flourished. Historians have been discussing how and why this could have been for centuries. Olivier Hekster takes you to th
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Author: Clifford Ando

Publisher: Edinburgh University Press

ISBN: 0748655344

Category: History

Page: 272

View: 9036

In this pioneering history Clifford Ando describes and integrates the contrasting histories of different parts of the empire and assesses the impacts of administrative, political and religious change.
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Patterns in the Representation of Roman Emperors on Imperial Coinage, A.D. 193-284

Author: Erika Manders

Publisher: BRILL

ISBN: 900418970X

Category: History

Page: 363

View: 7668

Based on a quantitative and qualitative analysis of 8227 coin types, this book describes and interprets the diachronic development of the representation of Roman emperors on imperial coins issued between 193 and 284.
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Britain in the Roman Empire, 54 BC - AD 409

Author: David Mattingly

Publisher: Penguin

ISBN: 1101160403

Category: History

Page: 640

View: 2596

Part of the Penguin History of Britain series, An Imperial Possession is the first major narrative history of Roman Britain for a generation. David Mattingly draws on a wealth of new findings and knowledge to cut through the myths and misunderstandings that so commonly surround our beliefs about this period. From the rebellious chiefs and druids who led native British resistance, to the experiences of the Roman military leaders in this remote, dangerous outpost of Europe, this book explores the reality of life in occupied Britain within the context of the shifting fortunes of the Roman Empire.
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Author: A. D Lee

Publisher: Edinburgh University Press

ISBN: 0748668357

Category: History

Page: 360

View: 4667

A. D. Lee charts the significant developments which marked the transformation of Ancient Rome into medieval Byzantium.
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Author: Jill Harries

Publisher: Oxford University Press on Demand

ISBN: N.A

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 292

View: 7457

Sidonius Apollinaris (c.430-c.485) was a high-profile senator and champion of Latin letters, as well as a Christian bishop in Roman Gaul. His career and struggles to maintain conflicting loyalties provide a classic and fascinating illustration of the tottering state of the Roman Empire in the fifth century AD.
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Ideas, Practices, Actors

Author: N.A

Publisher: BRILL

ISBN: 9004249516

Category: Political Science

Page: 360

View: 8902

Law and Empire relates the principles of legal thinking in Chinese, Islamic, and European contexts to practices of lawmaking and adjudication. It shows how legal procedure and legal thinking could be used in strikingly different ways.
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Author: Jill Harries

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9780521422734

Category: History

Page: 246

View: 4985

The first systematic historical treatment in English of public law in the later Roman Empire.
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Author: J. S Richardson

Publisher: Edinburgh University Press

ISBN: 0748655336

Category: History

Page: 288

View: 5637

Centring on the reign of the emperor Augustus, volume four is pivotal to the series, tracing of the changing shape of the entity that was ancient Rome through its political, cultural and economic history.
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Author: Nathan Rosenstein

Publisher: Edinburgh University Press

ISBN: 0748650814

Category: History

Page: 312

View: 6695

Nathan Rosenstein charts Rome's incredible journey and command of the Mediterranean over the course of the third and second centuries BC.
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Current Perspectives

Author: N.A

Publisher: BRILL

ISBN: 9004252584

Category: History

Page: 1120

View: 6666

This collection of papers, arising from the Late Antique Archaeology conference series, explores war and warfare in Late Antiquity. Papers examine strategy and intelligence, weaponry, literary sources and topography, the West Roman Empire, the East Roman Empire, the Balkans, civil war and Italy.
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Author: Apicius

Publisher: Courier Corporation

ISBN: 0486156494

Category: Cooking

Page: 301

View: 6985

Oldest known cookbook in existence offers readers a clear picture of what foods Romans ate and how they prepared them, from fig fed pork to rose pie. 49 illustrations.
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A Thousand Years of Empire

Author: W. V. Harris

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1316684156

Category: History

Page: N.A

View: 8921

The Roman Empire was one of the largest and most enduring in world history. In his new book, distinguished historian William V. Harris sets out to explain, within an eclectic theoretical framework, the waxing and eventual waning of Roman imperial power, together with the Roman community's internal power structures (political power, social power, gender power and economic power). Effectively integrating analysis with a compelling narrative, he traces this linkage between the external and the internal through three very long periods, and part of the originality of the book is that it almost uniquely considers both the gradual rise of the Roman Empire and its demise as an empire in the fifth and seventh centuries AD. Professor Harris contends that comparing the Romans of these diverse periods sharply illuminates both the growth and the shrinkage of Roman power as well as the Empire's extraordinary durability.
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