A Practical Approach

Author: Angela Mariani

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 019063118X

Category: History

Page: 240

View: 6054

Improvisation and Inventio in the Performance of Medieval Music: A Practical Approach is an innovative and groundbreaking approach to medieval music as living repertoire. The book provides philosophical frameworks, primary-source analysis, and clear, actionable practices and exercises aimed at recovering the improvisatory and inventive aspects of medieval music for contemporary musicians. Aimed at both instrumentalists and vocalists, the book explores the utilization of musical models, the inventive implications of medieval notation, and the ways in which memory, mode, rhetoric, and primary source paradigms inform the improvisatory process in both monophonic and polyphonic music of the Middle Ages. Angela Mariani, an experienced performer of both medieval music and folk and traditional musics, rediscovers and explicates the processes of imagination, invention, and improvisation which historically energized both medieval music in its own period and in its revival in our own time. Based on decades of research, university teaching, ensemble direction, collaboration, and performance, Mariani's impassioned stance that "the elusive element of inventio, as the medieval rhetoricians would have called it, must always be provided by the performer in the present," emphasizes medieval music performance practice as a dynamic and still-vital tradition. Students, teachers, directors, and those interested in the wealth of expressive beauty found in the music of the middle ages will likewise find value and meaning in her clear and accessible prose, and in the practical processes and exercises that make this book unique within the literature of medieval performance practice.
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A Practical Guide

Author: Bill Swick

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0190661925

Category: Music

Page: 224

View: 8639

As guitar instruction increases in popularity in secondary schools, many band, choir, and orchestra teachers are asked to teach guitar. In one helpfully concise volume, Teaching Beginning Guitar Class: A Practical Guide provides all of the practical tools that are necessary to teach guitar in the classroom, especially for music instructors who are not guitar specialists. Formatted to follow the school year from summer planning to opening weeks of the fall semester to a week-to-week timeline for the full school year, Teaching Beginning Guitar Class encompasses all possible needs for a non-guitar playing music instructor navigating the world of guitar instruction in a classroom setting. In twelve expertly organized chapters, author and veteran guitar teacher Bill Swick gives hard and fast guides for instruction, providing reassurance alongside invaluable tips for novice guitar educators. This book addresses questions such as 'I Do Not Play Guitar, Why Do I have to Teach Guitar?'; 'What is the Classroom Lifespan of a Guitar?'; and 'New Students in January?' while also providing practical solutions including basic setup, how to select the correct method book, and equipment maintenance.
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Author: Jeffery T. Kite-Powell

Publisher: Indiana University Press

ISBN: 0253348668

Category: Music

Page: 474

View: 6672

A revised and expanded guide to performance practice issues in Renaissance music
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From Cantare super Librum to Partimenti

Author: Massimiliano Guido

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1317048938

Category: Music

Page: 236

View: 921

In recent years, scholars and musicians have become increasingly interested in the revival of musical improvisation as it was known in the Renaissance and Baroque periods. This historically informed practice is now supplanting the late Romantic view of improvised music as a rhapsodic endeavour—a musical blossoming out of the capricious genius of the player—that dominated throughout the twentieth century. In the Renaissance and Baroque eras, composing in the mind (alla mente) had an important didactic function. For several categories of musicians, the teaching of counterpoint happened almost entirely through practice on their own instruments. This volume offers the first systematic exploration of the close relationship among improvisation, music theory, and practical musicianship from late Renaissance into the Baroque era. It is not a historical survey per se, but rather aims to re-establish the importance of such a combination as a pedagogical tool for a better understanding of the musical idioms of these periods. The authors are concerned with the transferral of historical practices to the modern classroom, discussing new ways of revitalising the study and appreciation of early music. The relevance and utility of such an improvisation-based approach also changes our understanding of the balance between theoretical and practical sources in the primary literature, as well as the concept of music theory itself. Alongside a word-centred theoretical tradition, in which rules are described in verbiage and enriched by musical examples, we are rediscovering the importance of a music-centred tradition, especially in Spain and Italy, where the music stands alone and the learner must distil the rules by learning and playing the music. Throughout its various sections, the volume explores the path of improvisation from theory to practice and back again.
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A Practical Guide to Musical Invention

Author: Carl Humphries

Publisher: Hal Leonard Corporation

ISBN: 9780879309770

Category: Music

Page: 488

View: 8332

"The Piano Improvisation Handbook" offers a comprehensive overview of the practical skills and theoretical issues involved in mastering all forms of piano improvisation. It explores a wide range of styles, including classical, jazz, rock and blues. Whereas other books on improvisation typically offer little more than models for imitation and exercises for practising, this one adopts an approach specifically designed to encourage and enable independent creative exploration. The book contains a series of graded tutorial sections with musical examples on CD, as well as an extensive introductory section detailing the history of keyboard and piano improvisation, an appendix listing useful scales, chords, voicings and progressions across all keys, a bibliography and a discography. In addition to sections outlining how melody, harmony, rhythm, texture and form work in improvised piano music, there are sections devoted to explaining how ideas can be developed into continuous music and to exploring the process of finding a personal style. A key feature is the distinctive stress the author puts on the interconnectedness of jazz and classical music where improvisation is concerned. This book is best suited to those with at least some prior experience of learning the piano. However, the rudiments of both music theory and piano technique are covered in such a way that it can also serve as an effective basis for a self-sufficient course in creative piano playing.
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Collaboration and Improvisation in Contemporary Music

Author: Eric F. Clarke,Mark Doffman

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0199355932

Category: Music

Page: 417

View: 9259

Creative practice in music, particularly in traditional concert culture, is commonly understood in terms of a rather stark division of labour between composer and performer. But this overlooks the distributed and interactive nature of the creative processes on which so much contemporary music depends. The incorporation of two features-improvisation and collaboration-into much contemporary music suggests that the received view of the relationship between composition and performance requires reassessment. Improvisation and collaborative working practices blur the composition/performance divide and, in doing so, provide important new perspectives on the forms of distributed creativity that play a central part in much contemporary music. Distributed Creativity: Collaboration and Improvisation in Contemporary Music explores the different ways in which collaboration and improvisation enable and constrain creative processes. Thirteen chapters and twelve shorter Interventions offer a range of perspectives on distributed creativity in music, on composer/performer collaborations and on contemporary improvisation practices. The chapters provide substantial discussions of a variety of conceptual frameworks and particular projects, while the Interventions present more informal contributions from a variety of practitioners (performers, composers, improvisers), giving insights into the pleasures and perils of working creatively in collaborative and improvised ways.
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Author: Jeremy Yudkin,Professor of Music and Chair of the Musicology and Ethnomusicology Department Jeremy Yudkin

Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA

ISBN: 9780190206123

Category:

Page: 544

View: 6426

Music in Medieval Europe combines a cultural history of the Middle Ages and in-depth scholarship on the music and leading composers active during the period. It includes an integrated anthology of key works with approachable and enlightening explanations, making it easily accessible for both beginning and advanced students. Its chronological organization, broad scope, and detailed music analyses make Music in Medieval Europe an ideal introductory text. Visit the book's free, open-access Companion Website at www.oup.com/us/yudkin for recordings of key examples available through streaming audio and other materials to help students succeed.
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Analyzing Radiohead

Author: Brad Osborn

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0190629231

Category: Music

Page: 248

View: 967

More than any rock artist since The Beatles, Radiohead's music inhabits the sweet spot between two extremes: on the one hand, music that is wholly conventional and conforms to all expectations of established rock styles, and, on the other hand, music so radically experimental that it thwarts any learned notions. While averting mainstream trends but still achieving a significant level of success in both US and UK charts, Radiohead's music includes many surprises and subverted expectations, yet remains accessible within a framework of music traditions. In Everything in its Right Place: Analyzing Radiohead, Brad Osborn reveals the functioning of this reconciliation of extremes in various aspects of Radiohead's music, analyzing the unexpected shifts in song structure, the deformation of standard 4/4 backbeats, the digital manipulation of familiar rock 'n' roll instrumentation, and the expected resolutions of traditional cadence structures. Expanding on recent work in musical perception, focusing particularly on form, rhythm and meter, timbre, and harmony, Everything in its Right Place treats Radiohead's recordings as rich sonic ecosystems in which a listener participates in an individual search for meaning, bringing along expectations learned from popular music, classical music, or even Radiohead's own compositional idiolect. Radiohead's violations of these subjective expectation-realization chains prompt the listener to search more deeply for meaning within corresponding lyrics, biographical details of the band, or intertextual relationships with music, literature, or film. Synthesizing insights from a range of new methodologies in the theory of pop and rock, and specifically designed for integration into music theory courses for upper level undergraduates, Everything in its Right Place is sure to find wide readership among scholars and students, as well as avid listeners who seek a deeper understanding of Radiohead's distinctive juxtapositional style.
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Author: Edwin H Case Professor of American Music George E Lewis,Benjamin Piekut

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0195370937

Category: Creation (Literary, artistic, etc.)

Page: 616

View: 8637

Improvisation informs a vast array of human activity, from creative practices in art, dance, music, and literature to everyday conversation and the relationships to natural and built environments that surround and sustain us. The two volumes of the Oxford Handbook of Critical Improvisation Studies gather scholarship on improvisation from an immense range of perspectives, with contributions from more than sixty scholars working in architecture, anthropology, art history, computer science, cognitive science, cultural studies, dance, economics, education, ethnomusicology, film, gender studies, history, linguistics, literary theory, musicology, neuroscience, new media, organizational science, performance studies, philosophy, popular music studies, psychology, science and technology studies, sociology, and sound art, among others.
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Author: Claude V. Palisca

Publisher: University of Illinois Press

ISBN: 0252092074

Category: Music

Page: 312

View: 6692

During the great upheavals in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, Europe was divided over ideas about religion, science, education, economy, and government. The Church fought the Reformation, scholars formed into competing universities, and trade became increasingly internationalized. Musicians and musicologists of the time could not ignore the contending factions, and the general ferment of ideas ran parallel to thinking about music, as well as strongly affecting its practical composition and performance. As a result, the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries present a special opportunity to study the relationship between music and ideas. Music and Ideas in the Sixteenth and Seventeenth Centuries shows Claude V. Palisca--one of the preeminent musicologists of our time--at the height of his powers, discussing the relationships between musical style and intellectual history, the influence of humanism on the revival of music theory, the competing notions of style, and the intermingled effects of rhetoric, poetics, religion, and science. Palisca's discussions demonstrate how this period's musical thought was penetrated by many aspects of culture, including religious reform, secularization, the emergence of vernacular literature, documentary historiography, the rise and decline of neo-Platonism, Aristotelian poetics, the scientific movement, the revival of rhetoric, and openness to emotional experience. This summation of Palisca's life work was nearly finished in 2001, when Palisca died. It was brought to completion by Thomas J. Mathiesen.
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Ornamentation and Vocal Style According to the Treatises

Author: Timothy J. McGee

Publisher: Clarendon Press

ISBN: 0191584363

Category: Music

Page: 216

View: 9677

The Sound of Medieval Song is a study of how sacred and secular music was actually sung during the Middle Ages. The source of the information is the actual notation in the early manuscripts as well as statements found in approximately 50 theoretical treatises written between the years 600-1500. The writings describe various singing practices and both desirable and undesirable vocal techniques, providing a fairly accurate picture of how singers approached the music of the period. Detailed descriptions of the types and uses of improvised ornament indicate that in performance the music was highly ornate, and included trill, gliss, reverberation, pulsation, pitch inflection, non-diatonic tones, and cadenza-like passages of various lengths. The treatises also provide evidence of stylistic differences in various geographical locations. McGee draws conclusions about the kind of vocal production and techniques necessary in order to reproduce the music as it was performed during the Middle Ages, aligning the practices much more closely with those of the Middle East than has ever been previously acknowledged.
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History, Culture, Resources

Author: Charlie McNabb

Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield

ISBN: 1442275529

Category: Social Science

Page: 304

View: 3487

This timely resource—the first reference text on nonbinary gender identities—offers an accessible entry into researching this topic. Written by a nonbinary scholar and librarian, this text includes historical information, bibliographies and other research materials, and a glossary of the rich vocabulary emerging from nonbinary communities.
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Author: N.A

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Encyclopedias and dictionaries

Page: N.A

View: 1624

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Author: N.A

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Encyclopedias and dictionaries

Page: N.A

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Author: Timothy James McGee

Publisher: Western Michigan Univ Medieval

ISBN: N.A

Category: Music

Page: 331

View: 2541

One impression that stands out from this collection is the extent to which improvisation was an important factor in all of the arts. As each of the authors assembles a case by ferreting out bits and pieces of information having to do with a single art, the weight of the assembled material lends additional strength to each case. By considering the overall picture that results, as well as that made by each of the individual studies, the reader is able to see much more clearly the role played by improvisation from the late Middle Ages through to the time of Shakespeare and beyond. A careful reading of the essays brings with it the awareness that to ignore improvisation is to distort the art in a major way. In light of the present volume, the very concept of "faithful historical re-creation" takes on a much broader and more complex character.
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Author: University of California, Berkeley

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category:

Page: N.A

View: 2323

Includes general and summer catalogs issued between 1878/1879 and 1995/1997.
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Ethnomusicology in the Study of Gregorian Chant

Author: Peter Jeffery

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN: 9780226395807

Category: History

Page: 222

View: 4520

Studying Gregorian chant presents many problems to the researcher because its most important stages of development were not recorded in writing. From the sixth to the tenth century, this form of music existed only in song as medieval musicians relied on their memories and voices to pass each verse from one generation to the next. Peter Jeffery offers an innovative new approach for understanding how these melodies were created, memorized, performed, and modified. Drawing on a variety of disciplines, including anthropology and ethnomusicology, he identifies characteristics of Gregorian chant that closely resemble other oral traditions in non-Western cultures and demonstrates ways music historians can take into account the social, cultural, and anthropological contexts of chant's development.
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Author: Tim Murphey

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: N.A

Category: Foreign Language Study

Page: 151

View: 1668

Shows how teachers can 'tune in' to students and use their musical interests to enhance their learning.
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Author: Ari Herstand

Publisher: Liveright Publishing

ISBN: 1631491512

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 400

View: 5121

"Ari is at the front of the front. He gets it. I've read a hundred how-to-make-it-in-the-music-biz books, and this one is today's definitive, comprehensive manual." —Jack Conte, 150+ million YouTube views, Pomplamoose, CEO of Patreon Forget everything you think you know about the odds of “making it” in the music industry. Today, odds mean nothing and success is not about lucky breaks. It’s about conquering social media, mastering the art of merchandising and simply working harder and being smarter than everyone else. We are living in the midst of an industry renaissance, one that has left the record companies desperately struggling to maintain their prominence, as a subculture of dedicated, DIY (do-it-yourself) musicians have taken over. These days talent is a given and success has to be earned. In 2008, Ari Herstand boldly turned in his green Starbucks apron to his manager, determined to make a living off his craft as a singer/songwriter. Almost a decade later, he has become a founding member of the new DIY movement and a self-sustaining musician, all without the help of a major label. Now, drawing from years of experience, Herstand has written the definitive guide for other like-minded artists, the ones who want to forge their own path and not follow the traditional markers of success, like record sales, hits on the radio or the amount of your label advance. Incredibly comprehensive and brutally honest throughout, How to Make It in the New Music Business covers every facet of the "new" business, including how to: Build a grass-roots fan base—and understand the modern fan Book a profitable tour, and tips for playing live, such as opening vs. headlining etiquette, and putting on a memorable show Become popular on YouTube, Spotify and SoundCloud Get songs placed in film and television Earn royalties you didn’t know existed and reach your crowdfunding goals Musicians will not only be introduced to all the tools available today but will be shown how to effectively leverage them to actually make money. More important, they will develop the mindset to be aware of new advancements both online and in the real world and always stay in tune with a constantly evolving landscape. There has never been a better time to be an independent musician. Today, fans can communicate with their idols by simply picking up their phones, artists are able to produce studio-worthy content from their basement and albums are funded not by "record men" but by generous, engaged supporters. As result, How to Make It in the New Music Business is a must-have guide for anyone hoping to navigate the increasingly complex yet advantageous landscape that is the modern music industry.
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