Memoirs of an Unrepentant Advocate

Author: Nancy Gertner

Publisher: Beacon Press

ISBN: 0807011436

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 249

View: 2274

Recounts the self-proclaimed outsider lawyer's experiences from her early days as a trial attorney through becoming a U.S. District Court judge.
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Memoirs of an Unrepentant Advocate

Author: Nancy Gertner

Publisher: Beacon Press

ISBN: 0807095486

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 298

View: 4025

From a “Human Rights Hero,” a memoir of her illustrious career litigating groundbreaking cases In the boys' club climate of 1975, Nancy Gertner launched her career fighting a murder charge on behalf of antiwar activist Susan Saxe, one of the few women to ever make the FBI's Most Wanted List. What followed was a storied span of groundbreaking firsts, as Gertner threw herself into criminal and civil cases focused on women's rights and civil liberties. Gertner writes, for example, about representing Clare Dalton, the Harvard Law professor who famously sued the school after being denied tenure, and of being one of the first lawyers to introduce evidence of Battered Women's Syndrome in a first-degree murder defense. She writes about the client who sued her psychiatrist after he had sexually preyed on her, and another who sued her employers at Merrill Lynch--she had endured strippers and penis-shaped cakes in the office, but the wildly skewed distribution of clients took professional injury too far. All of these were among the first cases of their kind. Gertner brings her extensive experience to bear on issues of long-standing importance today: the general evolution of thought regarding women and fetuses as legally separate entities, possibly at odds; the fungible definition of rape and the rights of both the accused and the victim; ever-changing workplace attitudes and policies around women and minorities; the concept of abetting crime. In Defense of Women is the one-of-a-kind memoir of an exceptional, self-proclaimed "outsider lawyer."
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Author: N.A

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 0807011487

Category:

Page: N.A

View: 1816

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Equality for Women

Author: Christine Lunardini

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 042998202X

Category: Political Science

Page: 218

View: 4169

Alice Paul: Equality for Women shows the dominant and unwavering role Paul played in the passage of the Nineteenth Amendment, granting the vote to American women. The dramatic details of Paul's imprisonment and solitary confinement, hunger strike, and force-feeding at the hands of the U.S. government illustrate her fierce devotion to the cause she spent her life promoting. Placed in the context of the first half of the twentieth century, Paul's story also touches on issues of progressivism and labor reform, race and class, World War I patriotism and America's emerging role as a global power, women's activism in the political sphere, and the global struggle for women's rights. About the Lives of American Women series: Selected and edited by renowned women's historian Carol Berkin, these brief biographies are designed for use in undergraduate courses. Rather than a comprehensive approach, each biography focuses instead on a particular aspect of a women's life that is emblematic of her time, or which made her a pivotal figure in the era. The emphasis is on a "good read," featuring accessible writing and compelling narratives, without sacrificing sound scholarship and academic integrity. Primary sources at the end of each biography reveal the subject's perspective in her own words. Study questions and an annotated bibliography support the student reader.
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A True Story of False Memory

Author: Meredith Maran

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN: 9780470944837

Category: Social Science

Page: 272

View: 7985

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The Remarkable Life of New Deal Attorney and Supreme Court Advocate Bessie Margolin

Author: Marlene Trestman

Publisher: LSU Press

ISBN: 0807162108

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 280

View: 7747

Through a life that spanned every decade of the twentieth century, Supreme Court advocate Bessie Margolin shaped modern American labor policy while creating a place for female lawyers in the nation's highest courts. Despite her beginnings in an orphanage and her rare position as a southern, Jewish woman pursuing a legal profession, Margolin became an important and influential Supreme Court advocate. In this comprehensive biography, Marlene Trestman reveals the forces that propelled and the obstacles that impeded Margolin's remarkable journey, illuminating the life of this trailblazing woman. Raised in the Jewish Orphans' Home in New Orleans, Margolin received an extraordinary education at the Isidore Newman Manual Training School. Both institutions stressed that good citizenship, hard work, and respect for authority could help people achieve economic security and improve their social status. Adopting these values, Margolin used her intellect and ambition, along with her femininity and considerable southern charm, to win the respect of her classmates, colleagues, bosses, and judges -- almost all of whom were men. In her career she worked with some of the most brilliant legal professionals in America. A graduate of Tulane and Yale Law Schools, Margolin launched her career in the early 1930s, when only 2 percent of America's attorneys were female, and far fewer were Jewish and from the South. According to Trestman, Margolin worked hard to be treated as "one of the boys." For the sake of her career, she eschewed marriage -- but not romance -- and valued collegial relationships, never shying from a late-night brief-writing session or a poker game. But her personal relationships never eclipsed her numerous professional accomplishments, among them defending the constitutionality of the New Deal's Tennessee Valley Authority, drafting rules establishing the American military tribunals for Nazi war crimes in Nuremberg, and, on behalf of the Labor Department, shepherding through the courts the child labor, minimum wage, and overtime protections of the Fair Labor Standards Act of 1938. A founding member of that National Organization for Women, Margolin culminated her government service as a champion of the Equal Pay Act, arguing and winning the first appeals. Margolin's passion for her work and focus on meticulous preparation resulted in an outstanding record in appellate advocacy, both in number of cases and rate of success. By prevailing in 21 of her 24 Supreme Court arguments Margolin shares the elite company of only a few dozen women and men who attained such high standing as Supreme Court advocates.
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An Unlikely Journey from Hopeless to Humanitarian

Author: Barry Soper,Rufus Hannah

Publisher: Sourcebooks, Inc.

ISBN: 9781402244728

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 256

View: 7317

PRAISE for A BUM DEAL "Hannah's recollections of his mental state at the time are almost heartbreaking in their honesty and intensity...remarkable story of personal redemption." -Booklist starred review "Here is the remarkable story behind an American tragedy, a twisted fall into unspeakable exploitation and the hoary depths of human existence followed by a redemptive return to grace."-Steve Lopez, author of The Soloist and LA Times columnist "A remarkable true story of how a chance meeting between two very different men transformed them not only into friends, but humanitarians on a crucial mission. If there was ever a lesson on the nobility of the human spirit, even under the most adverse circumstances, it is found in the pages of this incredible book." -Brian Levin "A Bum Deal: An Unlikely Journey from Hopeless to Humanitarian artfully explains the importance of understanding homelessness one life at a time. This gritty no-holds-barred memoir juxtaposes acts of unthinkable exploitation with instances of profound and encouraging exhortation." -Neil J. Donovan, Executive Director, National Coalition for the Homeless Rufus Hannah is known to millions around the world, unfortunately, as "Rufus the Stunt Bum" because of his participation in the infamous Bumfights video series. But his story doesn't end there...it is a story of incredible pride and perseverance, and a recovery few could have imagined. Rufus's story is inspiring to anyone who has ever struggled with personal demons and life challenges and wondered where they would find the strength to survive even one more day.
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Lively Stories of Detachment and Isolation

Author: Adam Resnick

Publisher: Penguin

ISBN: 0147516218

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 272

View: 2425

Adam Resnick, an Emmy Award-winning writer for NBC's "Late Night with David Letterman", has spent his entire life trying to avoid interaction with people. While courageously admiting to being "euphorically antisocial" and "sick in the head", he allows us to plunge even deeper into his troubled psyche in this unabashedly uproarious memoir-in-essays..---From publisher.
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Toward a Positive Psychology of Self-esteem

Author: Christopher J. Mruk

Publisher: Springer Publishing Company

ISBN: 9780826103147

Category: Psychology

Page: 294

View: 8329

In addition to the sound research findings, theory, and practice information that you have come to depend on with the past two editions, the third edition of Self-Esteem Research, Theory, and Practice brings with it much newly revised and updated information to reflect the changes in the field of self-esteem at large. New key features include: * New major theories of self-esteem * New chapter on the new positive psychology * 150 new references * Written in a clear, concise style.
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Author: Mary Ellen Snodgrass

Publisher: ABC-CLIO

ISBN: 1440837856

Category: History

Page: 827

View: 7477

This A-to-Z compendium explores more than 150 American women activists from colonial times to the present, examining their backgrounds and the focus of their activism, and provides examples of their speeches. • Covers issues from 1637 to 2015, representing minority perspectives and speeches • Surveys oration as a means of enlightening the public on the needs of the poor, disenfranchised, undereducated, and underemployed females • Introduces less familiar activists, such as Samantha Power and Ai-jen Poo • Includes illustrations; a timeline; an appendix of significant speeches identified by title, date, setting, and topic; and a bibliography of primary and secondary sources
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Witness To A Landmark Decision

Author: Jack Greenberg

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9780974728612

Category: Law

Page: 308

View: 2680

Excerpted from Crusaders in the courts, anniversary edition: legal battles of the civil rights movement.
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Author: Annie Dillard

Publisher: Vintage

ISBN: 0307477665

Category: Philosophy

Page: 224

View: 9397

National Bestseller "Beautifully written and delightfully strange...as earthy as it is sublime...in the truest sense, an eye-opener." --Daily News From Annie Dillard, the Pulitzer Prize-winning author of Pilgrim at Tinker Creek and one of the most compelling writers of our time, comes For the Time Being, her most profound narrative to date. With her keen eye, penchant for paradox, and yearning for truth, Dillard renews our ability to discover wonder in life's smallest--and often darkest--corners. Why do we exist? Where did we come from? How can one person matter? Dillard searches for answers in a powerful array of images: pictures of bird-headed dwarfs in the standard reference of human birth defects; ten thousand terra-cotta figures fashioned for a Chinese emperor in place of the human court that might have followed him into death; the paleontologist and theologian Teilhard de Chardin crossing the Gobi Desert; the dizzying variety of clouds. Vivid, eloquent, haunting, For the Time Being evokes no less than the terrifying grandeur of all that remains tantalizingly and troublingly beyond our understanding. "Stimulating, humbling, original--. [Dillard] illuminate[s] the human perspective of the world, past, present and future, and the individual's relatively inconsequential but ever so unique place in it."--Rocky Mountain News
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Thurgood Marshall, the Groveland Boys, and the Dawn of a New America

Author: Gilbert King

Publisher: Harper Collins

ISBN: 0062097717

Category: History

Page: 464

View: 311

Devil in the Grove, winner of the Pulitzer Prize for general nonfiction, is a gripping true story of racism, murder, rape, and the law. It brings to light one of the most dramatic court cases in American history, and offers a rare and revealing portrait of Thurgood Marshall that the world has never seen before. As Isabel Wilkerson’s The Warmth of Other Suns did for the story of America’s black migration, Gilbert King’s Devil in the Grove does for this great untold story of American legal history, a dangerous and uncertain case from the days immediately before Brown v. Board of Education in which the young civil rights attorney Marshall risked his life to defend a boy slated for the electric chair—saving him, against all odds, from being sentenced to death for a crime he did not commit.
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Lives in the Law

Author: Jill Norgren

Publisher: NYU Press

ISBN: 1479865966

Category: History

Page: 304

View: 2573

The captivating story of how a diverse group of women, including Janet Reno and Ruth Bader Ginsburg, broke the glass ceiling and changed the modern legal profession In Stories from Trailblazing Women Lawyers, award-winning legal historian Jill Norgren curates the oral histories of one hundred extraordinary American women lawyers who changed the profession of law. Many of these stories are being told for the first time. As adults these women were on the front lines fighting for access to law schools and good legal careers. They challenged established rules and broke the law’s glass ceiling.Norgren uses these interviews to describe the profound changes that began in the late 1960s, interweaving social and legal history with the women’s individual experiences. In 1950, when many of the subjects of this book were children, the terms of engagement were clear: only a few women would be admitted each year to American law schools and after graduation their professional opportunities would never equal those open to similarly qualified men. Harvard Law School did not even begin to admit women until 1950. At many law schools, well into the 1970s, men told female students that they were taking a place that might be better used by a male student who would have a career, not babies. In 2005 the American Bar Association’s Commission on Women in the Profession initiated a national oral history project named the Women Trailblazers in the Law initiative: One hundred outstanding senior women lawyers were asked to give their personal and professional histories in interviews conducted by younger colleagues. The interviews, made available to the author, permit these women to be written into history in their words, words that evoke pain as well as celebration, humor, and somber reflection. These are women attorneys who, in courtrooms, classrooms, government agencies, and NGOs have rattled the world with insistent and successful demands to reshape their profession and their society. They are women who brought nothing short of a revolution to the profession of law.
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Courts, Corporations, and Symbolic Civil Rights

Author: Lauren B. Edelman

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN: 022640093X

Category: Social Science

Page: 312

View: 2120

Since the passage of the Civil Rights Act, virtually all companies have antidiscrimination policies in place. Although these policies represent some progress, women and minorities remain underrepresented within the workplace as a whole and even more so when you look at high-level positions. They also tend to be less well paid. How is it that discrimination remains so prevalent in the American workplace despite the widespread adoption of policies designed to prevent it? One reason for the limited success of antidiscrimination policies, argues Lauren B. Edelman, is that the law regulating companies is broad and ambiguous, and managers therefore play a critical role in shaping what it means in daily practice. Often, what results are policies and procedures that are largely symbolic and fail to dispel long-standing patterns of discrimination. Even more troubling, these meanings of the law that evolve within companies tend to eventually make their way back into the legal domain, inconspicuously influencing lawyers for both plaintiffs and defendants and even judges. When courts look to the presence of antidiscrimination policies and personnel manuals to infer fair practices and to the presence of diversity training programs without examining whether these policies are effective in combating discrimination and achieving racial and gender diversity, they wind up condoning practices that deviate considerably from the legal ideals.
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Author: Mourid Barghouti

Publisher: Anchor

ISBN: 0307486141

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 208

View: 2392

WINNER OF THE NAGUIB MAHFOUZ MEDAL FOR LITERATURE A fierce and moving work and an unparalleled rendering of the human aspects of the Palestinian predicament. Barred from his homeland after 1967’s Six-Day War, the poet Mourid Barghouti spent thirty years in exile—shuttling among the world’s cities, yet secure in none of them; separated from his family for years at a time; never certain whether he was a visitor, a refugee, a citizen, or a guest. As he returns home for the first time since the Israeli occupation, Barghouti crosses a wooden bridge over the Jordan River into Ramallah and is unable to recognize the city of his youth. Sifting through memories of the old Palestine as they come up against what he now encounters in this mere “idea of Palestine,” he discovers what it means to be deprived not only of a homeland but of “the habitual place and status of a person.” A tour de force of memory and reflection, lamentation and resilience, I Saw Ramallah is a deeply humane book, essential to any balanced understanding of today’s Middle East.
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A Season on France's Cote d'Azur and Italy's Costa Bella

Author: David Shalleck,Erol Munuz

Publisher: Broadway Books

ISBN: 0767930231

Category: Travel

Page: 352

View: 6091

An alluring, evocative summer voyage on the Mediterranean and into the enchanting seaside towns of France and Italy by a young American chef aboard an Italian billionaire couple’s spectacular sailing yacht. Having begun his cooking career in some of New York’s and San Francisco’s best restaurants, David Shalleck undertakes a European culinary adventure, a quest to discover what it really means to be a chef through a series of demanding internships in Provence and throughout Italy. After four years, as he debates whether it is finally time to return stateside and pursue something more permanent, he stumbles upon a rare opportunity: to become the chef on board Serenity, the classic sailing yacht owned by one of Italy’s most prominent couples. They present Shalleck with the ultimate challenge: to prepare all the meals for them and their guests for the summer, with no repeats, comprised exclusively of local ingredients that reflect the flavors of each port, presented flawlessly to the couple’s uncompromising taste—all from the confines of the yacht’s small galley while at sea. Shalleck invites readers to experience both place and food on Serenity’s five-month journey. He prepares the simple classics of Provençal cooking in the French Riviera, forages for delicate frutti di mare in Liguria to make crudo, finds the freshest fish along the Tuscan coast for cacciucco, embraces the season of sun-drenched tomatoes for acqua pazza in the Amalfi Coast, and crosses the Bay of Naples to serve decadent dark chocolate-almond cake at the Isle of Capri. Shalleck captures the distinctive sights, sounds, and unique character of each port, the work hard/play hard life of being a crew member, and the challenges of producing world-class cuisine for the stylish and demanding owners and their guests. An intimate view of the most exclusive of worlds, Mediterranean Summer offers readers a new perspective on breathtaking places, a memorable portrait of old world elegance and life at sea, as well recipes and tips to re-create the delectable food.
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The Challenging Life and Times of Lillian Hellman

Author: Alice Kessler-Harris

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing USA

ISBN: 1608193799

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 448

View: 7915

Lillian Hellman was a giant of twentieth-century letters and a groundbreaking figure as one of the most successful female playwrights on Broadway. Yet the author of The Little Foxes and Toys in the Attic is today remembered more as a toxic, bitter survivor and literary fabulist, the woman of whom Mary McCarthy said, "Every word she writes is a lie, including 'and' and 'the.'" In A Difficult Woman, renowned historian Alice Kessler-Harris undertakes a feat few would dare to attempt: a reclamation of a combative, controversial woman who straddled so many political and cultural fault lines of her time. Kessler-Harris renders Hellman's feisty wit and personality in all of its contradictions: as a non-Jewish Jew, a displaced Southerner, a passionate political voice without a party, an artist immersed in commerce, a sexually free woman who scorned much of the women's movement, a loyal friend whose trust was often betrayed, and a writer of memoirs who repeatedly questioned the possibility of achieving truth and doubted her memory. Hellman was a writer whose plays spoke the language of morality yet whose achievements foundered on accusations of mendacity. Above all else, she was a woman who made her way in a man's world. Kessler-Harris has crafted a nuanced life of Hellman, empathetic yet unsparing, that situates her in the varied contexts in which she moved, from New Orleans to Broadway to the hearing room of HUAC. A Difficut Woman is a major work of literary and intellectual history. This will be one of the most reviewed, and most acclaimed, books of 2012.
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My Path from Darkness to Freedom

Author: Rubin Hurricane Carter,Ken Klonsky

Publisher: Chicago Review Press

ISBN: 1569768226

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 320

View: 9094

A spiritual as well as a factual autobiography, this is a self-portrait of Rubin Hurricane Carter, a 20th-century icon and controversial victim of the U.S. justice system turned spokesperson for the wrongfully convicted. Exploring Carter's personal philosophy--born of the unimaginable duress of wrongful imprisonment and conceived through his defiance of the brutal institution of prison and a decade of solitary confinement--this work offers hope for those who have none and serves as a call to action for those who abhor injustice. Exposing the inherent flaws in the legal and penal systems, this autobiography also serves as a prison survival manual--be it a brick-and-mortar cell or the metaphorical prison of childhood abuse, racism, and despair.
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