Author: Allan C. Hutchinson

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1107123860

Category: Law

Page: 256

View: 6111

This book examines how the common law works through profiles of eight great cases.
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Author: Allan C. Hutchinson

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1316720985

Category: Law

Page: N.A

View: 5600

Toward an Informal Account of Legal Interpretation offers a viable account of law, judicial decision-making, and legal interpretation that is as fresh as it is familiar. The author expertly challenges the dominant mode of formalist theorizing and proposes an explanatory account of legal interpretation that can profitably be understood as an 'informal' intervention. Such an informal approach has no truck with either the claims of the formalists (i.e., that law is something separate from ideology) or those of the anti-formalists (i.e., that law is nothing other than ideological posturing). Hutchinson insists that, when understood properly, legal interpretation is an applied exercise in law-and-ideology; it is both constrained and unconstrained in equal measure. In developing this informalist account through a sustained application of the 'no vehicles in the park' rule, this book is wide-ranging in theoretical scope and substance, but also accessible and practical in style.
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Great Legal Cases and How they Shaped the World

Author: Allan C. Hutchinson

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1139495275

Category: Law

Page: N.A

View: 3696

Great cases are those judicial decisions around which the common law develops. This book explores eight exemplary cases from the United Kingdom, the United States and Australia that show the law as a living, breathing and down-the-street experience. It explores the social circumstances in which the cases arose and the ordinary people whose stories influenced and shaped the law as well as the characters and institutions (lawyers, judges and courts) that did much of the heavy lifting. By examining the consequences and fallout of these decisions, the book depicts the common law as an experimental, dynamic, messy, productive, tantalizing and bottom-up process, thereby revealing the diverse and uncoordinated attempts by the courts to adapt the law to changing conditions and shifting demands. Great cases are one way to glimpse the workings of the common law as an untidy but stimulating exercise in human judgment and social accomplishment.
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Why the Truth Matters More Than You Think

Author: Andy Andrews

Publisher: Thomas Nelson

ISBN: 0849949904

Category: Self-Help

Page: 96

View: 1209

In this compact, nonpartisan book, Andrews urges readers to be “careful students” of the past, seeking accurate, factual accounts of events and decisions that illuminate choices we face now. By considering how the Nazi German regime was able to carry out over eleven million institutional killings between 1933 and 1945, Andrews advocates for an informed population that demands honesty and integrity from its leaders and from each other. Andy Andrews believes that good answers come only from asking the right questions. Through the powerful, provocative question, “How do you kill eleven million people?”—the number of people killed by the Nazi German regime between 1933 and 1945—he explores a number of other questions relevant to our lives today: Does it matter that millions of ordinary citizens have checked out of participating in the decisions that shape the future of our country? Which is more dangerous: politicians with ill intent, or the too-trusting population that allows such people to lead them? How are we supposed to tell the difference between the “good guys" and the “bad guys”? How does the answer to this question affect not only our country but our families, our faith, and our values? What happens to a society in which truth is absent? Andrews issues a wake-up call: become informed, passionate citizens who demand honesty and integrity from our leaders, or suffer the consequences of our own ignorance and apathy. Furthermore, we can no longer measure a leader’s worth by the yardsticks provided by the left or the right. Instead, we must use an unchanging standard: the pure, unvarnished truth.
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Inside a Dark Corner of the Criminal Justice System

Author: Kevin Davis

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN: 0743270940

Category: Law

Page: 320

View: 475

A member of Chicago's elite Murder Task Force unit describes the lives of its public defenders, many of whom juggle dozens of clients and death-row cases simultaneously, in a sobering account that focuses on the dramatic trial of an accused cop killer. Reprint.
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Author: Marc Stauch,Kay Wheat

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1351685619

Category: Law

Page: 678

View: 797

Text, Cases and Materials on Medical Law and Ethics presents a valuable collection of materials relating to often controversial areas of the law. Comprising extracts from statutes, cases and scholarly articles alongside expert author commentary and guidance which signposts the key issues and principles, this book is an ideal companion to this increasingly popular subject. Fully revised, this new edition incorporates expanded content, including: updated coverage of consent and decision making, including the the Montgomery v Lanarkshire Health Board (2015) judgment; the impacts of the EC directive for clinical trials and GDPR on the research use of patient data; and discussion of other recent developments in the case law, including the 2017 Charlie Gard litigation, the 2016 Privy Council decision in Williams v Bermuda on negligence causation, and the UK Supreme Court judgment in A & B v SS for Health (2017) on funding for patients from Northern Ireland seeking terminations elsewhere. Providing a comprehensive and up-to-date resource on this topical area of the law, this textbook is an invaluable reference tool for students of medical law as well as those studying medicine.
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Author: Alvin J. Schmidt

Publisher: Zondervan

ISBN: 0310862507

Category: Religion

Page: 448

View: 6572

Western civilization is becoming increasingly pluralistic,secularized, and biblically illiterate. Many people todayhave little sense of how their lives have benefited fromChristianity’s influence, often viewing the church withhostility or resentment.How Christianity Changed the World is a topicallyarranged Christian history for Christians and non-Christians. Grounded in solid research and written in apopular style, this book is both a helpful apologetic toolin talking with unbelievers and a source of evidence forwhy Christianity deserves credit for many of thehumane, social, scientific, and cultural advances in theWestern world in the last two thousand years.Photographs, timelines, and charts enhance eachchapter.This edition features questions for reflection anddiscussion for each chapter.
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The Osage Murders and the Birth of the FBI

Author: David Grann

Publisher: Vintage

ISBN: 0385534256

Category: True Crime

Page: 352

View: 7887

NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER - NATIONAL BOOK AWARD FINALIST "Disturbing and riveting...It will sear your soul." —Dave Eggers, New York Times Book Review SHELF AWARENESS'S BEST BOOK OF 2017 Named a best book of the year by Wall Street Journal, The Boston Globe, San Francisco Chronicle, GQ, Time, Newsday, Entertainment Weekly, Time Magazine, NPR's Maureen Corrigan, NPR's "On Point," Vogue, Smithsonian, Cosmopolitan, Seattle Times, Bloomberg, Lit Hub's "Ultimate Best Books," Library Journal, Paste, Kirkus, Slate.com and Book Browse From New Yorker staff writer David Grann, #1 New York Times best-selling author of The Lost City of Z, a twisting, haunting true-life murder mystery about one of the most monstrous crimes in American history In the 1920s, the richest people per capita in the world were members of the Osage Indian nation in Oklahoma. After oil was discovered beneath their land, they rode in chauffeured automobiles, built mansions, and sent their children to study in Europe. Then, one by one, the Osage began to be killed off. The family of an Osage woman, Mollie Burkhart, became a prime target. Her relatives were shot and poisoned. And it was just the beginning, as more and more members of the tribe began to die under mysterious circumstances. In this last remnant of the Wild West—where oilmen like J. P. Getty made their fortunes and where desperadoes like Al Spencer, the “Phantom Terror,” roamed—many of those who dared to investigate the killings were themselves murdered. As the death toll climbed to more than twenty-four, the FBI took up the case. It was one of the organization’s first major homicide investigations and the bureau badly bungled the case. In desperation, the young director, J. Edgar Hoover, turned to a former Texas Ranger named Tom White to unravel the mystery. White put together an undercover team, including one of the only American Indian agents in the bureau. The agents infiltrated the region, struggling to adopt the latest techniques of detection. Together with the Osage they began to expose one of the most chilling conspiracies in American history. In Killers of the Flower Moon, David Grann revisits a shocking series of crimes in which dozens of people were murdered in cold blood. Based on years of research and startling new evidence, the book is a masterpiece of narrative nonfiction, as each step in the investigation reveals a series of sinister secrets and reversals. But more than that, it is a searing indictment of the callousness and prejudice toward American Indians that allowed the murderers to operate with impunity for so long. Killers of the Flower Moon is utterly compelling, but also emotionally devastating.
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Overcoming The Futile Obsession With Getting Everyone Back Alive That Is Killing Our Expansion Into Space

Author: Rand Simberg

Publisher: Interglobal Media LLC

ISBN: 0989135527

Category: Law

Page: 242

View: 3021

The history of exploration and establishment of new lands, science and technologies has always entailed risk to the health and lives of the explorers. Yet, when it comes to exploring and developing the high frontier of space, the harshest frontier ever, the highest value is apparently not the accomplishment of those goals, but of minimizing, if not eliminating, the possibility of injury or death of the humans carrying them out. For decades since the end of Apollo, human spaceflight has been very expensive and relatively rare (about 500 people total, with a death rate of about 4%), largely because of this risk aversion on the part of the federal government and culture. From the Space Shuttle, to the International Space Station, the new commercial crew program to deliver astronauts to it, and the regulatory approach for commercial spaceflight providers, our attitude toward safety has been fundamentally irrational, expensive and even dangerous, while generating minimal accomplishment for maximal cost. This book entertainingly explains why this means that we must regulate passenger safety in the new commercial spaceflight industry with a lighter hand than many might instinctively prefer, that NASA must more carefully evaluate rewards from a planned mission to rationally determine how much should be spent to avoid the loss of participants, and that Congress must stop insisting that safety is the highest priority, for such insistence is an eloquent testament to how unimportant they and the nation consider the opening of this new
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Inside the Von Bulow Case

Author: Alan M. Dershowitz

Publisher: Random House

ISBN: 030782831X

Category: Law

Page: 288

View: 8517

Defense attorney and Harvard law professor provides an insider's account of the trial, appeal, subsequent retrial, and acquittal in the murder case of Claus von Bulow, profiling the people involved. NOTE: This edition does not include photographs.
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A Monthly Journal Serving the Business and Professional Interests of the American Bar

Author: N.A

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Commercial law

Page: N.A

View: 8025

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Sex and Murder on the Plains

Author: James W. Hewitt

Publisher: U of Nebraska Press

ISBN: 0803280734

Category: History

Page: 160

View: 4449

In 1973 the small southwest Nebraska railroad town of McCook became the unlikely scene of a grisly murder. More than forty years later, author James W. Hewitt returns to the scene and unearths new details about what happened. After pieces of Edwin and Wilma Hoyt's dismembered bodies were found floating on the surface of a nearby lake, authorities charged McCook resident Harold Nokes and his wife, Ena, with murder. Harold pleaded guilty to murder and Ena pleaded guilty to two counts of wrongful disposal of a dead body, but the full story of why and how he murdered the Hoyts has never been told. Hewitt interviews law enforcement officers, members of the victims' family, weapons experts, and forensic psychiatrists, and delves into newspaper reports and court documents from the time. Most significant, Harold granted Hewitt his first and only interview, in which the convicted murderer changed several parts of his 1974 confession. In Cold Storage takes readers through the evidence, including salacious details of sex and intrigue between the Hoyts and the Nokeses, and draws new conclusions about what really happened between the two families on that fateful September night.
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Author: Norman M. Naimark

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN: 0691152381

Category: History

Page: 176

View: 9813

Between the early 1930s and his death in 1953, Joseph Stalin had more than a million of his own citizens executed. This book is the chilling story of these crimes. The book puts forward the argument that mass killings under Stalin in the 1930s were indeed acts of genocide and that the Soviet dictator himself was behind them.
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Author: Frank Charles Smith,Lucien Brock Proctor,Heman Gerald Chapin,Richard Selden Harvey

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Commercial law

Page: N.A

View: 9138

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Author: Rachel Carson

Publisher: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt

ISBN: 9780618249060

Category: Nature

Page: 378

View: 5508

Discusses the reckless annihilation of fish and birds by the use of pesticides and warns of the possible genetic effects on humans.
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A True Story of the Fight for Justice

Author: Bryan A. Stevenson

Publisher: Delacorte Press

ISBN: 0525580050

Category: Young Adult Nonfiction

Page: 288

View: 9103

In this young adult adaptation of the acclaimed bestselling Just Mercy, which the New York Times calls "as compelling as To Kill a Mockingbird, and in some ways more so," Bryan Stevenson delves deep into the broken U.S. justice system, detailing from his personal experience his many challenges and efforts as a lawyer and social advocate, especially on behalf of America's most rejected and marginalized people. In this very personal work--proceeds of which will go to charity--Bryan Stevenson recounts many and varied stories of his work as a lawyer in the U.S. criminal justice system on behalf of those in society who have experienced some type of discrimination and/or have been wrongly accused of a crime and who deserve a powerful advocate and due justice under the law. Through the Equal Justice Initiative (EJI), an organization Stevenson founded as a young lawyer and for which he currently serves as Executive Director, this important work continues. EJI strives to end mass incarceration and excessive punishment in the United States, working to protect basic human rights for the most vulnerable people in American society. "A deeply moving collage of true stories . . . .This is required reading." --Kirkus, Starred Review Praise for Just Mercy: A Story of Justice and Redemption: "Important and compelling." --Pulitzer Prize-winning author TRACY KIDDER "Gripping. . . . What hangs in the balance is nothing less than the soul of a great nation." --DESMOND TUTU, Nobel Peace Prize Laureate "An inspiring and powerful story." --#1 New York Times bestselling author JOHN GRISHAM
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