Definer of a Nation

Author: Jean Edward Smith

Publisher: Henry Holt and Company

ISBN: 1466862319

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 752

View: 3362

A New York Times Notable Book of 1996 It was in tolling the death of Supreme Court Chief Justice John Marshall in 1835 that the Liberty Bell cracked, never to ring again. An apt symbol of the man who shaped both court and country, whose life "reads like an early history of the United States," as the Wall Street Journal noted, adding: Jean Edward Smith "does an excellent job of recounting the details of Marshall's life without missing the dramatic sweep of the history it encompassed."
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Definer of a Nation

Author: Jean Edward Smith

Publisher: Macmillan

ISBN: 080501389X

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 736

View: 425

Interprets the life, career, and contributions of the man who sat on the United States Supreme Court for thirty-five years and who was instrumental in molding the court into the powerful body it is today. 15,000 first printing.
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FDR

Author: Jean Edward Smith

Publisher: Random House

ISBN: 9781588366245

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 880

View: 5313

One of today’s premier biographers has written a modern, comprehensive, indeed ultimate book on the epic life of Franklin Delano Roosevelt. In this superlative volume, Jean Edward Smith combines contemporary scholarship and a broad range of primary source material to provide an engrossing narrative of one of America’s greatest presidents. This is a portrait painted in broad strokes and fine details. We see how Roosevelt’s restless energy, fierce intellect, personal magnetism, and ability to project effortless grace permitted him to master countless challenges throughout his life. Smith recounts FDR’s battles with polio and physical disability, and how these experiences helped forge the resolve that FDR used to surmount the economic turmoil of the Great Depression and the wartime threat of totalitarianism. Here also is FDR’s private life depicted with unprecedented candor and nuance, with close attention paid to the four women who molded his personality and helped to inform his worldview: His mother, Sara Delano Roosevelt, formidable yet ever supportive and tender; his wife, Eleanor, whose counsel and affection were instrumental to FDR’s public and individual achievements; Lucy Mercer, the great romantic love of FDR’s life; and Missy LeHand, FDR’s longtime secretary, companion, and confidante, whose adoration of her boss was practically limitless. Smith also tackles head-on and in-depth the numerous failures and miscues of Roosevelt’s public career, including his disastrous attempt to reconstruct the Judiciary; the shameful internment of Japanese-Americans; and Roosevelt’s occasionally self-defeating Executive overreach. Additionally, Smith offers a sensitive and balanced assessment of Roosevelt’s response to the Holocaust, noting its breakthroughs and shortcomings. Summing up Roosevelt’s legacy, Jean Smith declares that FDR, more than any other individual, changed the relationship between the American people and their government. It was Roosevelt who revolutionized the art of campaigning and used the burgeoning mass media to garner public support and allay fears. But more important, Smith gives us the clearest picture yet of how this quintessential Knickerbocker aristocrat, a man who never had to depend on a paycheck, became the common man’s president. The result is a powerful account that adds fresh perspectives and draws profound conclusions about a man whose story is widely known but far less well understood. Written for the general reader and scholars alike, FDR is a stunning biography in every way worthy of its subject. From the Hardcover edition.
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Author: Jean Edward Smith

Publisher: Random House

ISBN: 0679644296

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 976

View: 2987

NAMED ONE OF THE BEST BOOKS OF THE YEAR BY The Christian Science Monitor • St. Louis Post-Dispatch “Magisterial.”—The New York Times In this extraordinary volume, Jean Edward Smith presents a portrait of Dwight D. Eisenhower that is as full, rich, and revealing as anything ever written about America’s thirty-fourth president. Here is Eisenhower the young dreamer, charting a course from Abilene, Kansas, to West Point and beyond. Drawing on a wealth of untapped primary sources, Smith provides new insight into Ike’s maddening apprenticeship under Douglas MacArthur. Then the whole panorama of World War II unfolds, with Eisenhower’s superlative generalship forging the Allied path to victory. Smith also gives us an intriguing examination of Ike’s finances, details his wartime affair with Kay Summersby, and reveals the inside story of the 1952 Republican convention that catapulted him to the White House. Smith’s chronicle of Eisenhower’s presidential years is as compelling as it is comprehensive. Derided by his detractors as a somnambulant caretaker, Eisenhower emerges in Smith’s perceptive retelling as both a canny politician and a skillful, decisive leader. He managed not only to keep the peace, but also to enhance America’s prestige in the Middle East and throughout the world. Unmatched in insight, Eisenhower in War and Peace at last gives us an Eisenhower for our time—and for the ages. NATIONAL BESTSELLER Praise for Eisenhower in War and Peace “[A] fine new biography . . . [Eisenhower’s] White House years need a more thorough exploration than many previous biographers have given them. Smith, whose long, distinguished career includes superb one-volume biographies of Grant and Franklin Roosevelt, provides just that.”—The Washington Post “Highly readable . . . [Smith] shows us that [Eisenhower’s] ascent to the highest levels of the military establishment had much more to do with his easy mastery of politics than with any great strategic or tactical achievements.”—The Wall Street Journal “Always engrossing . . . Smith portrays a genuinely admirable Eisenhower: smart, congenial, unpretentious, and no ideologue. Despite competing biographies from Ambrose, Perret, and D’Este, this is the best.”—Publishers Weekly (starred review) “No one has written so heroic a biography [on Eisenhower] as this year’s Eisenhower in War and Peace [by] Jean Edward Smith.”—The National Interest “Dwight Eisenhower, who was more cunning than he allowed his adversaries to know, understood the advantage of being underestimated. Jean Edward Smith demonstrates precisely how successful this stratagem was. Smith, America’s greatest living biographer, shows why, now more than ever, Americans should like Ike.”—George F. Will
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Author: Jean Edward Smith

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN: 1476741212

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 832

View: 512

Washington Post Notable Nonfiction Book of the Year Distinguished presidential biographer Jean Edward Smith offers a “comprehensive and compelling” (The New York Times) life of George W. Bush, showing how he ignored his advisors to make key decisions himself—most disastrously in invading Iraq—and how these decisions were often driven by the President’s deep religious faith. George W. Bush, the forty-third president of the United States, almost singlehandedly decided to invade Iraq. It was possibly the worst foreign-policy decision ever made by a president. The consequences dominated the Bush Administration and still haunt us today. In Bush, a “well-rounded portrait…necessary and valuable in this election year” (Christian Science Monitor), Jean Edward Smith demonstrates that it was not Dick Cheney, Donald Rumsfeld, or Condoleezza Rice, but President Bush himself who took personal control of foreign policy. Bush drew on his deep religious conviction that important foreign-policy decisions were simply a matter of good versus evil. Domestically, he overreacted to 9/11 and endangered Americans’ civil liberties. Smith explains that it wasn’t until the financial crisis of 2008 that Bush finally accepted expert advice. As a result, he authorized decisions that saved the economy from possible collapse, even though some of those decisions violated Bush’s own political philosophy. “An excellent initial assessment of a presidency that began in controversy…and ended with the international and domestic failures that saddled Bush with the most sustained negative ratings of any modern president” (Dallas Morning News), this comprehensive evaluation will surely surprise many readers. “Written in sober, smooth, snark-free prose, with an air of thoughtful, detached authority, the book is nonetheless exceedingly damning in its judgments about George W. Bush’s years in office” (The Washington Post).
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Der Mann und seine Zeit

Author: William Taubman

Publisher: C.H.Beck

ISBN: 3406700454

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 935

View: 9872

Im Ausland verehrt und bewundert als der Mann, der das Tor zu einem neuen Zeitalter aufstieß, gilt er bei seinen Landsleuten als Schwächling und Totengräber des sowjetischen Imperiums: Michail Gorbatschow ist für die einen ein überragender Staatsmann und für die anderen ein Versager. Pulitzerpreisträger William Taubman legt nun die grundlegende Biographie dieser Jahrhundertgestalt vor – akribisch recherchiert, fundiert im Urteil und fesselnd geschrieben. Als Michail Gorbatschow 1985 mit 54 Jahren jüngster Generalsekretär in der Geschichte der KPdSU wurde, war die Sowjetunion eine von zwei Supermächten. Doch nur vier Jahre später hatten Perestroika und Glasnost die Sowjetunion für immer verändert und Gorbatschow mehr Feinde als Freunde. Seine Politik beendete den Kalten Krieg. Doch im Jahr darauf musste er nach einem gescheiterten Putsch – ohne es zu wollen – dem Kollaps jenes Imperiums zuschauen, das er zu retten versucht hatte. William Taubman schildert in seinem Buch, wie ein Bauernjunge vom Lande es bis an die Spitze im Kreml bringt, sich mit Amerikas erzkonservativem Präsidenten Ronald Reagan anfreundet und es der UdSSR und dem Ostblock erlaubt, sich aufzulösen, ohne Zuflucht zur Gewalt zu nehmen. Wer war dieses „Rätsel Gorbatschow“ – ein wahrhaft großer Politiker oder ein Mann, der an seinen eigenen Fehlern scheiterte und an Mächten, gegen die er nicht gewinnen konnte?
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Author: Jean Edward Smith

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN: 9780743217019

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 784

View: 4407

Ulysses S. Grant was the first four-star general in the history of the United States Army and the only president between Andrew Jackson and Woodrow Wilson to serve eight consecutive years in the White House. As general in chief, Grant revolutionized modern warfare. Rather than capture enemy territory or march on Southern cities, he concentrated on engaging and defeating the Confederate armies in the field, and he pursued that strategy relentlessly. As president, he brought stability to the country after years of war and upheaval. He tried to carry out the policies of Abraham Lincoln, the man he admired above all others, and to a considerable degree he succeeded. Yet today, Grant is remembered as a brilliant general but a failed president. In this comprehensive biography, Jean Edward Smith reconciles these conflicting assessments of Grant's life. He argues convincingly that Grant is greatly underrated as a president. Following the turmoil of Andrew Johnson's administration, Grant guided the nation through the post- Civil War era, overseeing Reconstruction of the South and enforcing the freedoms of new African-American citizens. His presidential accomplishments were as considerable as his military victories, says Smith, for the same strength of character that made him successful on the battlefield also characterized his years in the White House. Grant was the most unlikely of military heroes: a great soldier who disliked the army and longed for a civilian career. After graduating from West Point, he served with distinction in the Mexican War. Following the war he grew stale on frontier garrison postings, despaired for his absent wife and children, and began drinking heavily. He resigned from the army in 1854, failed at farming and other business endeavors, and was working as a clerk in the family leathergoods store when the Civil War began. Denied a place in the regular army, he was commissioned a colonel of volunteers and, as victory followed victory, moved steadily up the Union chain of command. Lincoln saw in Grant the general he had been looking for, and in the spring of 1864 the president brought him east to take command of all the Union armies. Smith dispels the myth that Grant was a brutal general who willingly sacrificed his soldiers, pointing out that Grant's casualty ratio was consistently lower than Lee's. At the end of the war, Grant's generous terms to the Confederates at Appomattox foreshadowed his generosity to the South as president. But, as Smith notes, Grant also had his weaknesses. He was too trusting of his friends, some of whom schemed to profit through their association with him. Though Grant himself always acted honorably, his presidential administration was rocked by scandals. "He was the steadfast center about and on which everything else turned," Philip Sheridan wrote, and others who served under Grant felt the same way. It was this aura of stability and integrity that allowed Grant as president to override a growing sectionalism and to navigate such national crises as the Panic of 1873 and the disputed Hayes-Tilden election of 1876. At the end of his life, dying of cancer, Grant composed his memoirs, which are still regarded by historians as perhaps the finest military memoirs ever written. They sold phenomenally well, and Grant the failed businessman left his widow a fortune in royalties from sales of the book. His funeral procession through the streets of Manhattan closed the city, and behind his pallbearers, who included both Confederate and Union generals, marched thousands of veterans from both sides of the war.
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The Eventful Life & Times of Polly & John Marshall

Author: Jaquelin Payne Taylor

Publisher: iUniverse

ISBN: 1462056954

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 148

View: 3038

Much has been written about the legendary times of John Marshall, the longest serving chief justice in Supreme Court history, but little is known about the love of his life, his ‘dearest Polly’. Polly was shy and retiring and stayed in the background, but she was known as his closest confidant and advisor. This book shows how the enduring love that began during the Revolutionary War when Polly was only fourteen lasted and strengthened despite the turbulent times they faced both in war and peace. Their life together mirrors the time when Richmond, the new capital of Virginia, grew from a primitive village to a thriving port city, and the early bungalows, built to house legislators when the capital moved to Richmond during the war, were replaced by “plantations-in-town”. This book gives a rich and graphic picture of life in the new United States and of events impacting the lives of those dominant people who determined the nation’s future during the late 18th and early 19th centuries.
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Thomas Jefferson, John Marshall, and the Epic Stru

Author: James F. Simon

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN: 1439127638

Category: History

Page: 352

View: 6017

What Kind of Nation is a riveting account of the bitter and protracted struggle between two titans of the early republic over the power of the presidency and the independence of the judiciary. The clash between fellow Virginians (and second cousins) Thomas Jefferson and John Marshall remains the most decisive confrontation between a president and a chief justice in American history. Fought in private as well as in full public view, their struggle defined basic constitutional relationships in the early days of the republic and resonates still in debates over the role of the federal government vis-à-vis the states and the authority of the Supreme Court to interpret laws. Jefferson was a strong advocate of states' rights who distrusted the power of the federal government. He believed that the Constitution defined federal authority narrowly and left most governmental powers to the states. He was suspicious of the Federalist-dominated Supreme Court, whose members he viewed as partisan promoters of their political views at the expense of Jefferson's Republicans. When he became president, Jefferson attempted to correct the Court's bias by appointing Republicans to the Court. He also supported an unsuccessful impeachment of Federalist Supreme Court Justice Samuel Chase. Marshall believed in a strong federal government and was convinced that an independent judiciary offered the best protection for the Constitution and the nation. After he was appointed by Federalist President John Adams to be chief justice in 1801 (only a few weeks before Jefferson succeeded Adams), he issued one far-reaching opinion after another. Beginning with the landmark decision Marbury v. Madison in 1803, and through many cases involving states' rights, impeachment, treason, and executive privilege, Marshall established the Court as the final arbiter of the Constitution and the authoritative voice for the constitutional supremacy of the federal government over the states. As Marshall's views prevailed, Jefferson became increasingly bitter, certain that the Court was suffocating the popular will. But Marshall's carefully reasoned rulings endowed the Court with constitutional authority even as they expanded the power of the federal government, paving the way for later Court decisions sanctioning many pivotal laws of the modern era, such as those of the New Deal, the Great Society, and the Civil Rights Act of 1964. In a fascinating description of the treason trial of Jefferson's former vice president, Aaron Burr, James F. Simon shows how Marshall rebuffed President Jefferson's claim of executive privilege. That decision served as precedent for a modern Supreme Court ruling rejecting President Nixon's claim that he did not have to hand over the Watergate tapes. More than 150 years after Jefferson's and Marshall's deaths, their words and achievements still reverberate in constitutional debate and political battle. What Kind of Nation is a dramatic rendering of a bitter struggle between two shrewd politicians and powerful statesmen that helped create a United States.
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Andrew Jackson in the White House

Author: Jon Meacham

Publisher: Random House

ISBN: 9781588368225

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 512

View: 7742

The definitive biography of a larger-than-life president who defied norms, divided a nation, and changed Washington forever Andrew Jackson, his intimate circle of friends, and his tumultuous times are at the heart of this remarkable book about the man who rose from nothing to create the modern presidency. Beloved and hated, venerated and reviled, Andrew Jackson was an orphan who fought his way to the pinnacle of power, bending the nation to his will in the cause of democracy. Jackson’s election in 1828 ushered in a new and lasting era in which the people, not distant elites, were the guiding force in American politics. Democracy made its stand in the Jackson years, and he gave voice to the hopes and the fears of a restless, changing nation facing challenging times at home and threats abroad. To tell the saga of Jackson’s presidency, acclaimed author Jon Meacham goes inside the Jackson White House. Drawing on newly discovered family letters and papers, he details the human drama–the family, the women, and the inner circle of advisers– that shaped Jackson’s private world through years of storm and victory. One of our most significant yet dimly recalled presidents, Jackson was a battle-hardened warrior, the founder of the Democratic Party, and the architect of the presidency as we know it. His story is one of violence, sex, courage, and tragedy. With his powerful persona, his evident bravery, and his mystical connection to the people, Jackson moved the White House from the periphery of government to the center of national action, articulating a vision of change that challenged entrenched interests to heed the popular will– or face his formidable wrath. The greatest of the presidents who have followed Jackson in the White House–from Lincoln to Theodore Roosevelt to FDR to Truman–have found inspiration in his example, and virtue in his vision. Jackson was the most contradictory of men. The architect of the removal of Indians from their native lands, he was warmly sentimental and risked everything to give more power to ordinary citizens. He was, in short, a lot like his country: alternately kind and vicious, brilliant and blind; and a man who fought a lifelong war to keep the republic safe–no matter what it took.
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Author: Lackland H. Bloom, Jr.

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0199366896

Category: Law

Page: 472

View: 3753

"Great cases like hard cases make bad law" declared Justice Oliver Wendell Holmes, Jr. in his dissenting opinion in the Northern Securities antitrust case of 1904. His maxim argues that those cases which ascend to the Supreme Court of the United States by virtue of their national importance, interest, or other extreme circumstance, make for poor bases upon which to construct a general law. Frequently, such cases catch the public's attention because they raise important legal issues, and they become landmark decisions from a doctrinal standpoint. Yet from a practical perspective, great cases could create laws poorly suited for far less publicly tantalizing but far more common situations. In Do Great Cases Make Bad Law?, Lackland H. Bloom, Jr. tests Justice Holmes' dictum by analyzing in detail the history of the Supreme Court's great cases, from Marbury v. Madison in 1803, to National Federation of Independent Business v. Sebelius, the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act case, in 2012. He treats each case with its own chapter, and explains why the Court found a case compelling, how the background and historical context affected the decision and its place in constitutional law and history, how academic scholarship has treated the case, and how the case integrates with and reflects off of Justice Holmes' famous statement. In doing so, Professor Bloom draws on the whole of the Supreme Court's decisional history to form an intricate scholarly understanding of the holistic significance of the Court's reasoning in American constitutional law.
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Discovering the Creative Secrets of Renaissance Florence, Elizabethan England, and America's Founding

Author: Alf J. Mapp

Publisher: Madison Books

ISBN: 146173598X

Category: History

Page: 648

View: 3263

In this intriguing book, best-selling author Alf Mapp, Jr. explores three periods in Western history that exploded with creativity: Elizabethan England, Renaissance Florence, and America's founding. What enabled these societies to make staggering jumps in scientific knowledge, develop new political structures, or create timeless works of art?
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What Kind of Nation; Lincoln and Chief Justice Taney; FDR and Chief Justice Hughes

Author: James F. Simon

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN: 1451671636

Category: History

Page: 1168

View: 1448

Collected together, James F. Simon’s books share the bitter struggles and compromises that have characterized the relationship between the presidents and the Supreme Court Chief Justices across US history. The bitter and protracted struggle between President Thomas Jefferson and Supreme Court Chief Justice John Marshall; the frustration and grudging admiration between FDR and Chief Justice Hughes; the clashes between President Abraham Lincoln and Chief Justice Roger B. Taney. These were the conflicts that ended slavery, that rescued us from the Great Depression, and that defined a nation—for better and for worse. And, Simon brings them to brilliant and compelling life.
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Controversy and Conflict Over the American Civil War

Author: Joan Waugh,Gary W. Gallagher

Publisher: Univ of North Carolina Press

ISBN: 0807832758

Category: History

Page: 292

View: 5987

The twelve essays in Wars within a War explore the internal stresses that posed serious challenges to the viability of the opposing sides in the Civil War as well as some of the ways in which wartime disputes and cultural fissures carried over into
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Volume 10: Law and Politics

Author: James W. Ely Jr.,Bradley G. Bond

Publisher: UNC Press Books

ISBN: 1469616742

Category: Reference

Page: 456

View: 8895

Volume 10 of The New Encyclopedia of Southern Culture combines two of the sections from the original edition, adding extensive updates and 53 entirely new articles. In the law section of this volume, 16 longer essays address broad concepts ranging from law schools to family law, from labor relations to school prayer. The 43 topical entries focus on specific legal cases and individuals, including historical legal professionals, parties from landmark cases, and even the fictional character Atticus Finch, highlighting the roles these individuals have played in shaping the identity of the region. The politics section includes 34 essays on matters such as Reconstruction, social class and politics, and immigration policy. New essays reflect the changing nature of southern politics, away from the one-party system long known as the "solid South" to the lively two-party politics now in play in the region. Seventy shorter topical entries cover individual politicians, political thinkers, and activists who have made significant contributions to the shaping of southern politics.
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Author: David L Hudson

Publisher: Visible Ink Press

ISBN: 157859264X

Category: Law

Page: 512

View: 8060

From the origins of the court to modern practical matters—including the federal judiciary system, the Supreme Court’s session schedule, and the argument, decision, and appeal process—this resource provides detailed answers on all aspects of the Supreme Court. Exploring the social, cultural, and political atmosphere in which judges are nominated and serve, this guide book answers questions such as When did the tradition of nine justices on the bench begin? When did the practice of hiring law clerks to assist with legal research and writing begin? and How do cases reach the Supreme Court? Details on historic decisions—including Marbury v. Madison, Brown v. Board of Education, Miranda v. Arizona, and Bush v. Gore—accompany a thorough history of all 17 Supreme Court Chief Justices.
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Author: Sina Dubovoy

Publisher: WestBow Press

ISBN: 1490831185

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: N.A

View: 8493

Francis Scott Key was born during the Revolutionary War on his family’s Maryland estate and died suddenly and unexpectedly in Baltimore at age sixty-three. History remembers him best as the composer of “The Star-Spangled Banner” and least of all as a noted poet and eminent lawyer. Time and again his career propelled him into the limelight, which explains how Key happened to find himself aboard a truce ship during the massive British bombardment of Fort McHenry in 1814. As he watched the assault all night long with the aid of a spyglass, the poet-lawyer was inspired to compose the ode that became the anthem of a nation. During his forty-plus years as a lawyer, Francis Scott Key argued well over one hundred appeals before the Supreme Court in Washington. As a devout evangelical Episcopalian and lay leader, he found himself steeped in the divisive issues sundering his church. His restless intellect and spirit sought an outlet in a mind-boggling array of philanthropic projects, which included the founding of the free African republic of Liberia. As a result of new and overlooked sources and materials, new facts about Francis Scott Key have emerged, and some age-old myths have been dispelled. What still remains true and enduring about the man are his genius, piety, and service to his country and fellow man.
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Author: David McCullough

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN: 9780743218290

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 752

View: 4256

The Pulitzer Prize–winning, bestselling biography of America’s founding father and second president that was the basis for the acclaimed HBO series, brilliantly told by master historian David McCullough. In this powerful, epic biography, David McCullough unfolds the adventurous life journey of John Adams, the brilliant, fiercely independent, often irascible, always honest Yankee patriot who spared nothing in his zeal for the American Revolution; who rose to become the second president of the United States and saved the country from blundering into an unnecessary war; who was learned beyond all but a few and regarded by some as “out of his senses”; and whose marriage to the wise and valiant Abigail Adams is one of the moving love stories in American history. This is history on a grand scale—a book about politics and war and social issues, but also about human nature, love, religious faith, virtue, ambition, friendship, and betrayal, and the far-reaching consequences of noble ideas. Above all, John Adams is an enthralling, often surprising story of one of the most important and fascinating Americans who ever lived.
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John Adams, Mornings on Horseback, Truman, The Course of Human Events

Author: David McCullough

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN: 145165815X

Category: History

Page: 2384

View: 4859

From “America’s most beloved biographer, David McCullough” (Time)—a collection of his bestselling biographies of American Presidents. This e-book box set features David McCullough’s award-winning biographies of American Presidents, including: · John Adams: The magisterial, Pulitzer Prize-winning biography of the independent, irascible Yankee patriot, one of our nation’s founders and most important figures, who became our second president. · Mornings on Horseback: The brilliant National Book Award-winning biography of young Theodore Roosevelt’s metamorphosis from sickly child to a vigorous, intense man poised to become a national hero and then president. · Truman: The Pulitzer Prize-winning biography of Harry Truman, the complex and courageous man who rose from modest origins to make momentous decisions as president, from dropping the atomic bomb to going to war in Korea. · Special Bonus: The Course of Human Events: In this Jefferson Lecture in the Humanities, David McCullough draws on his personal experience as a historian to acknowledge the crucial importance of writing in history’s enduring impact and influence, and he affirms the significance of history in teaching us about human nature through the ages.
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