The Idea of Racial Equality in American Education

Author: David L. Kirp

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN: 9780520050846

Category: History

Page: 374

View: 2992

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A Whole School Approach to Restorative Justice

Author: Belinda Hopkins

Publisher: Jessica Kingsley Publishers

ISBN: 1843101327

Category: Education

Page: 208

View: 9359

Annotation. "Restorative justice is a dynamic and innovative way of dealing with conflict in schools, promoting understanding and healing over assigning blame or dispensing punishment. It can improve the quality of school life not only through conflict resolution, but"
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Pursuing Equality in Societies of Difference

Author: Martha Minow,Richard A. Shweder,Hazel Rose Markus

Publisher: Russell Sage Foundation

ISBN: 1610447263

Category: Social Science

Page: 312

View: 991

Educators and policymakers who share the goal of equal opportunity in schools often hold differing notions of what entails a just school in multicultural America. Some emphasize the importance of integration and uniform treatment for all, while others point to the benefits of honoring cultural diversity in ways that make minority students feel at home. In Just Schools, noted legal scholars, educators, and social scientists examine schools with widely divergent methods of fostering equality in order to explore the possibilities and limits of equal education today. The contributors to Just Schools combine empirical research with rich ethnographic accounts to paint a vivid picture of the quest for justice in classrooms around the nation. Legal scholar Martha Minow considers the impact of school choice reforms on equal educational opportunities. Psychologist Hazel Rose Markus examines culturally sensitive programs where students exhibit superior performance on standardized tests and feel safer and more interested in school than those in color-blind programs. Anthropologist Heather Lindkvist reports on how Somali Muslims in Lewiston, Maine, invoked the American ideal of inclusiveness in winning dress-code exemptions and accommodations for Islamic rituals in the local public school. Political scientist Austin Sarat looks at a school system in which everyone endorses multiculturalism but holds conflicting views on the extent to which culturally sensitive practices should enter into the academic curriculum. Anthropologist Barnaby Riedel investigates how a private Muslim school in Chicago aspires to universalist ideals, and education scholar James Banks argues that schools have a responsibility to prepare students for citizenship in a multicultural society. Anthropologist John Bowen offers a nuanced interpretation of educational commitments in France and the headscarf controversy in French schools. Anthropologist Richard Shweder concludes the volume by connecting debates about diversity in schools with a broader conflict between national assimilation and cultural autonomy. As America's schools strive to accommodate new students from around the world, Just Schools provides a provocative and insightful look at the different ways we define and promote justice in schools and in society at large.
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Author: Frank Adams,Richard Kluger,Laughlin McDonald,Lorenzo Middleton,Elizabeth Eckford,Chris Mayfield,John Egerton,Mike Masterson,Anne Braden,Robert Coles,Clare Jupiter,R.C. Smith,Randall Williams,Steve Hoffius,Marcia Kunstel,Pat Stevens,Frank Kunstel,Charles Hardy,Mark Pinsky,Linda Williams,David Nevin,Robert Bills,Pamela George,Meyer Weinberg,Leon Hall,James Lyons,Kenneth Clark,Hayes Mizell

Publisher: The Institute for Southern Studies

ISBN: N.A

Category: Education

Page: 160

View: 8659

Before it was over, they fired him from the little schoolhouse at which he had taught devotedly for ten years. And they fired his wife and two of his sisters and a niece. And they threatened him with bodily harm. And they sued him on trumped-up charges and convicted him in a kangaroo court and left him with a judgment that denied him credit from any bank. And they burned his house to the ground while the fire department stood around watching the flames consume the night. And they stoned the church at which he pastored. And fired shotguns at him out of the dark. But he was not Job, and so he fired back and called the police, who did not come and kept not coming. Then he fled, driving north at eighty-five miles an hour over country roads, until he was across the state line. Soon after, they burned his church to the ground and charged him, for having shot back that night, with felonious assault with a deadly weapon, and so he became an official fugitive from justice. In time, the governor of his state announced they would not pursue this minister who had caused all the trouble, and said of him: Good riddance.
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Making Space for Youth to Speak Back

Author: John Smyth,Barry Down,Peter McInerney

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 9401790604

Category: Education

Page: 195

View: 4589

This book explores schools and how they can function as social institutions that advance the interests and life chances of all young people, especially those who are already the most marginalized and at an educational disadvantage. Social justice is a key theme as the book examines the needs of youth, the concept of school culture, school/community relations, socially critical pedagogy, curriculum and leadership and a socially critical approach to work. The Socially Just School is based upon four decades of intensive writing and researching of young lives. This work presents an alternative to the damaging school reform in which schools are made to serve the interests of the economy, education systems, the military, corporate or national interests. Readers will discover the hallmarks of socially just schools: - They educationally engage young people regardless of class, race, family or neighbourhood location and they engage them around their own educational aspirations. - They regard all young people as being morally entitled to a rewarding and satisfying experience of school, not only those whose backgrounds happen to fit with the values of schools. - They treat young people as having strengths and being ‘at promise’ rather than being ‘at risk’ and with ‘deficits’ or as ‘bundles of pathologies’ to be remedied or ‘fixed’. - They are ‘active listeners’ to the lives and cultures of their students and communities and they construct learning experiences that are embedded in young lives. This highly readable book will appeal to students and scholars in education and sociology, as well as to teachers and school administrators with an interest in social justice.
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How Leaders Go Beyond Inclusion

Author: Colleen A. Capper,Elise M. Frattura

Publisher: Corwin Press

ISBN: 9781412966955

Category: Education

Page: 162

View: 7172

Provides an introduction for schools to shift their special learning programs to inclusive services.
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'til the White Day is Done

Author: Jlove Calderon Marcella Runell Hall

Publisher: Lulu.com

ISBN: 061536067X

Category: Education

Page: 146

View: 3733

‘Til the White Day is Done is a line from the 1926 poem Dream Variations by Langston Hughes. White people are the world’s minority, yet white supremacy and racism are the scaffolding on which the American political and socioeconomic systems are built. This book was conceived by educator-activists JLove Calderon and Marcella Runell Hall in an effort to put action steps behind anti-racist rhetoric, in a move toward being truly and unapologetically pro-liberation--for everyone. You will find love letters written by some of the leading voices on contemporary issues of race and racism; over twenty lesson plans, ranging from the social construction of race, to the racialization of social media, to the prison industrial complex. This book is meant to catapult us to action, prompt dialogue, stimulate our minds and hearts, and provide educators with profound yet practical tools for creating social justice.
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New possibilities for education research

Author: Karen Trimmer,Ali Black,Stewart Riddle

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1317694600

Category: Education

Page: 282

View: 5640

This book explores the complexities of investigating minorities, majorities, boundaries and borders, and the experiences of researchers who choose to work in these spaces. It engages with issues of ethics, disclosure and representation, and contends with and seeks to contribute to emerging debates around power and the positioning of researchers and participants. Chapters examine epistemologies that shape researchers’ beliefs about the forms of research that are valued in educational research and theory, and consider the importance of research that genuinely seeks to explore voice, culture, story, authenticity and identity. Resisting the backdrop of standardisation, performativity and accountability agendas pervading governments and organisations, the book attends to the stories of real people, to understand regional and rural landscapes, to examine culture and the human condition and to give voice to those at the fringes of society who remain largely neglected and unheard. Drawing largely on studies from Australia, the book provides an overview of the many types of research being engaged in, revealing the value of different kinds of research, and gaining insight into how meaning and findings are disseminated in research and educational sectors and back into the contexts where research takes place. Mainstreams, Margins and the Spaces In-between will be of key interest to early career researchers and academics internationally, as well as postgraduate students completing research methods courses in the field of education, and the wider social sciences.
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Schools and Universities Partnering to Make a Difference

Author: Kristien Zenkov, Ph.D,Diane Corrigan,Ronald S. Beebe,Corey R. Sell

Publisher: Lexington Books

ISBN: 073917763X

Category: Education

Page: 378

View: 6276

This book highlights school/university partnerships, specifically Professional Development Schools’ focus on collaborative activities that endeavor to promote social justice in and across P-12 and university classrooms, educational institutions, and communities. The chapters provide concrete examples of instructional and curricular methods used to engage all the stakeholders within a Professional Development School model —university educators, school leaders, teachers, and teacher candidates— with social justice ideals.
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Facing the New Realities

Author: James L. Heft S. M.

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0199911371

Category: Religion

Page: 272

View: 5643

Catholic high schools in the United States have been undergoing three major changes: the shift to primarily lay leadership and teachers; the transition to a more consumerist and pluralist culture; and the increasing diversity of students attending Catholic high schools. James Heft argues that to navigate these changes successfully, leaders of Catholic education need to inform lay teachers more thoroughly, conduct a more profound social analysis of the culture, and address the real needs of students. After presenting the history of Catholic schools in the United States and describing the major legal decisions that have influenced their evolution, Heft describes the distinctive and compelling mission of a Catholic high school. Two chapters are devoted to leadership, and other chapters to teachers, students, alternative models of high schools, financing, and the key role of parents, who today may be described as ''post-deferential'' to traditional authorities, including bishops and priests. Written by an award-winning teacher, scholar, and recognized educational leader in Catholic education, Catholic High Schools should be read by everyone interested in religiously- affiliated educational institutions, particularly Catholic education.
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Migration, Education, and the Rise of the Black Panther Party in Oakland, California

Author: Donna Jean Murch

Publisher: UNC Press Books

ISBN: 0807895857

Category: Social Science

Page: 328

View: 1613

In this nuanced and groundbreaking history, Donna Murch argues that the Black Panther Party (BPP) started with a study group. Drawing on oral history and untapped archival sources, she explains how a relatively small city with a recent history of African American settlement produced such compelling and influential forms of Black Power politics. During an era of expansion and political struggle in California's system of public higher education, black southern migrants formed the BPP. In the early 1960s, attending Merritt College and other public universities radicalized Huey Newton, Bobby Seale, and many of the young people who joined the Panthers' rank and file. In the face of social crisis and police violence, the most disfranchised sectors of the East Bay's African American community--young, poor, and migrant--challenged the legitimacy of state authorities and of an older generation of black leadership. By excavating this hidden history, Living for the City broadens the scholarship of the Black Power movement by documenting the contributions of black students and youth who created new forms of organization, grassroots mobilization, and political literacy.
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Author: Andy Hargreaves,Dean Fink

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN: 1118429214

Category: Education

Page: 344

View: 8950

In Sustainable Leadership, Andy Hargreaves and Dean Fink address one of the most important and often neglected aspects of leadership: sustainability. The authors set out a compelling and original framework of seven principles for sustainable leadership characterized by Depth of learning and real achievement rather than superficially tested performance; Length of impact over the long haul, beyond individual leaders, through effectively managed succession; Breadth of influence, where leadership becomes a distributed responsibility; Justice in ensuring that leadership actions do no harm to and actively benefit students in other schools; Diversity that replaces standardization and alignment with diversity and cohesion; Resourcefulness that conserves and renews leaders' energy and doesn't burn them out; and Conservation that builds on the best of the past to create an even better future. This book is a volume in the Jossey-Bass Leadership Library in Education—a series designed to meet the demand for new ideas and insights about leadership in schools.
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The Dismantling of Affirmative Action at an Elite Public High School

Author: Rowena Robles

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 113550363X

Category: History

Page: 176

View: 2220

Asian Americans and the Shifting Politics of Race examines the political and discursive struggles around the dismantling of race-based admissions policies in an elite public high school in San Francisco. The book analyzes the arguments put forth by plaintiffs in and the media's depiction of the case, Brian Ho, Patrick Wong, & Hilary Chen v. SFUSD. The Ho lawsuit, filed by a group of Chinese Americans, challenged race-based admissions policies that were intended to ensure diversity by giving special consideration to African-American and Latino students. Robles argues that the Ho plaintiffs exploited the dominant racial construction of Asian Americans as model minorities to portray themselves as victims of discrimination, and relied on contrasting constructions of Black and Latino students as undeserving and unqualified beneficiaries of affirmative action. The decision in favor of the plaintiffs effectively ended school desegregation, racial balance, and affirmative action in San Francisco. In order to examine the consequences of the Ho decision on student attitudes, Robles spent four years studying and observing the first cohort of students to enter the high school after race was eliminated from admissions considerations.
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Taking it from the Field to Practice

Author: Christa Boske,Sarah Diem

Publisher: Emerald Group Publishing

ISBN: 1780522789

Category: Education

Page: 350

View: 7776

Global Leadership For Social Justice: Taking It From The Field To Practice proposes perspectives for conceptualizing the preparation of leaders for social justice and equity-oriented work in schools. Although faculty in the field of education have prepared thousands of school leaders, and the research continues to expand, limited research exists regarding how to prepare leaders for social justice work in schools, especially considering international contexts. This book builds on extant empirical and theoretical work in the area of educational leadership, and deepens understanding of what leading for social justice and equity-oriented work looks like within diverse schools.
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Author: Shelby Joe,Stephen Hayes

Publisher: Lulu.com

ISBN: 1304302075

Category: Education

Page: 306

View: 8563

Now in its third edition, General Academic's comprehensive guide to Houston private and select public schools contains more than 300 pages of advice, analysis, school profiles, and more. Our publication should provide the basic building blocks for parents to jump-start their journey in researching, applying to, and selecting a school for their child. This third edition features profiles on 41 private and 23 select public schools in and around Houston's 610 Loop and Beltway 8 highways. General Academic is an academic consulting and supplementary education company based in Houston's Rice Village; it was founded in 2003.
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From the Common School to "No Child Left Behind"

Author: William J. Reese

Publisher: JHU Press

ISBN: 1421400162

Category: Education

Page: 363

View: 1646

In this update to his landmark publication, William J. Reese offers a comprehensive examination of the trends, theories, and practices that have shaped America’s public schools over the last two centuries. Reese approaches this subject along two main lines of inquiry—education as a means for reforming society and ongoing reform within the schools themselves. He explores the roots of contemporary educational policies and places modern battles over curriculum, pedagogy, race relations, and academic standards in historical perspective. A thoroughly revised epilogue outlines the significant challenges to public school education within the last five years. Reese analyzes the shortcomings of "No Child Left Behind" and the continued disjuncture between actual school performance and the expectations of government officials. He discusses the intrusive role of corporations, economic models for enticing better teacher performance, the continued impact of conservatism, and the growth of home schooling and charter schools. Informed by a breadth of historical scholarship and based squarely on primary sources, this volume remains the standard text for future teachers and scholars of education.
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Author: Robert Griffin

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1136473297

Category: Education

Page: 256

View: 5799

This collection of original essays is designed for undergraduate and graduate courses in methods of teaching. While speaking to all the topics covered in traditional methods textbooks, the author also reflects on his own experiences as a student and teacher. He adopts a unique conversational and reflective style that integrates concerns for the well-being of teachers and their professional development, as well as for the role of students in the learning process. Engaging and informed, this book will be a resource for practicing teachers and those in training.
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One City, Two Schools, and the Story of Educational Opportunity in Modern America

Author: James E. Ryan

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0199798923

Category: Education

Page: 400

View: 5096

How is it that, half a century after Brown v. Board of Education, educational opportunities remain so unequal for black and white students, not to mention poor and wealthy ones? In his important new book, Five Miles Away, A World Apart, James E. Ryan answers this question by tracing the fortunes of two schools in Richmond, Virginia--one in the city and the other in the suburbs. Ryan shows how court rulings in the 1970s, limiting the scope of desegregation, laid the groundwork for the sharp disparities between urban and suburban public schools that persist to this day. The Supreme Court, in accord with the wishes of the Nixon administration, allowed the suburbs to lock nonresidents out of their school systems. City schools, whose student bodies were becoming increasingly poor and black, simply received more funding, a measure that has proven largely ineffective, while the independence (and superiority) of suburban schools remained sacrosanct. Weaving together court opinions, social science research, and compelling interviews with students, teachers, and principals, Ryan explains why all the major education reforms since the 1970s--including school finance litigation, school choice, and the No Child Left Behind Act--have failed to bridge the gap between urban and suburban schools and have unintentionally entrenched segregation by race and class. As long as that segregation continues, Ryan forcefully argues, so too will educational inequality. Ryan closes by suggesting innovative ways to promote school integration, which would take advantage of unprecedented demographic shifts and an embrace of diversity among young adults. Exhaustively researched and elegantly written by one of the nation's leading education law scholars, Five Miles Away, A World Apart ties together, like no other book, a half-century's worth of education law and politics into a coherent, if disturbing, whole. It will be of interest to anyone who has ever wondered why our schools are so unequal and whether there is anything to be done about it.
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