Character and Compilation

Author: Tony Honoré

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0199593302

Category: History

Page: 238

View: 4740

This book collects Honoré's groundbreaking work on the composition of Justinian's Digest, among the most important texts in Roman Law. It reconstructs the methodology of the Digest's composition, and examines the broader issues raised by the Digest's creation - how it was conceived by its compilers, its purpose, and its impact.
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Author: Alan Watson

Publisher: University of Pennsylvania Press

ISBN: 0812205510

Category: History

Page: 768

View: 1198

When Justinian became sole ruler of the Byzantine Empire in A.D. 527, he ordered the preparation of three compilations of Roman law that together formed the Corpus Juris Civilis. These works have become known individually as the Code, which collected the legal pronouncements of the Roman emperors, the Institutes, an elementary student's textbook, and the Digest, by far the largest and most highly prized of the three compilations. The Digest was assembled by a team of sixteen academic lawyers commissioned by Justinian in 533 to cull everything of value from earlier Roman law. It was for centuries the focal point of legal education in the West and remains today an unprecedented collection of the commentaries of Roman jurists on the civil law. Commissioned by the Commonwealth Fund in 1978, Alan Watson assembled a team of thirty specialists to produce this magisterial translation, which was first completed and published in 1985 with Theodor Mommsen's Latin text of 1878 on facing pages. This paperback edition presents a corrected English-language text alone, with an introduction by Alan Watson. Links to the three other volumes in the set: Volume 2 [Books 16-29] Volume 3 [Books 30-40] Volume 4 [Books 41-50]
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Containing an Account of Its Composition and of the Jurists Used Or Referred to Therein, Together with a Full Commentary on One Title (De Usufructu)

Author: Henry John Roby

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Digesta

Page: 279

View: 2017

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Theft, Rapine, Damage and Insult

Author: Justinian

Publisher: Penguin UK

ISBN: 0141961368

Category: Law

Page: 192

View: 3154

Codified by Justinian I and published under his aegis in A.D. 533, this celebrated work of legal history forms a fascinating picture of ordinary life in Rome.
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With an English Translation and an Essay on the Law of Mortgage in the Roman Law

Author: N.A

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Digesta

Page: 98

View: 7431

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Author: Justinian I (Emperor of the East)

Publisher: Cornell University Press

ISBN: 9780801494000

Category: Law

Page: 160

View: 9196

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With an English Translation and an Essay on the Law of Mortgage in the Roman Law (Classic Reprint)

Author: Justinian I.

Publisher: Forgotten Books

ISBN: 9780656074600

Category: Law

Page: 174

View: 608

Excerpt from Justinian's Digest, Vol. 20: With an English Translation and an Essay on the Law of Mortgage in the Roman Law In regard to any translation of the Digest, there is room for reasonable doubt whether students derive any benefit at all from such. A translation encourages the student to neglect the original, and thus he acquires a curious kind of artificial knowledge which cannot be called Roman law, and is merely of conventional value. It may be said, however, that something is gained and something lost by the use of a translation. The gain is the saving of time and trouble for those whose know ledge Oi the original language is imperfect; the loss is that of the tone and spirit of the original. Moreover in translating any portion of the Digest, the special difficulty of translating technical expressions arises. There are at least three modes of encountering such a difficulty: Firstly, the expression may be left untranslated and simply given in the original. Mr. C. H. Monro, in his admirable translation of the Digest, Books 1 - 6, considers that, if one universal method is to be followed throughout, this is the best. Secondly, the Latin expression may be translated by means of the nearest corresponding institution in English law. This plan, on the same supposition, Mr. Monro considers the worst; and thinks that the translation of the term Heres by Heir is a fertile source Of error. Dr. H. J. Roby admits that sometimes the nature of the argument makes it necessary to retain the original expression, and that for some expressions it is not easy to find a tolerably correct English equivalent. But, except in these two cases, Dr. Roby takes an opposite view to Mr. Monro, and sees no ground for pedantic retentions which make the subject difficult for a student to comprehend and are repulsive in point of style. About the Publisher Forgotten Books publishes hundreds of thousands of rare and classic books. Find more at www.forgottenbooks.com This book is a reproduction of an important historical work. Forgotten Books uses state-of-the-art technology to digitally reconstruct the work, preserving the original format whilst repairing imperfections present in the aged copy. In rare cases, an imperfection in the original, such as a blemish or missing page, may be replicated in our edition. We do, however, repair the vast majority of imperfections successfully; any imperfections that remain are intentionally left to preserve the state of such historical works.
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Author: Bruce W. Frier,Serena Connolly,Simon Corcoran,Michael Hewson Crawford,John Noel Dillon,Dennis P. Kehoe,Noel Emmanuel Lenski,Thomas A. J. McGinn,Charles F. Pazdernik,Benet Salway

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 0521196825

Category: History

Page: 2023

View: 8370

"The Codex of Justinian is, together with the Digest, the core of the great Byzantine compilation of Roman law called the Corpus Iuris Civilis. The Codex gathers legal proclamations issued by Roman Emperors from the second to the sixth centuries C.E. Its influence on subsequent legal development in the Medieval and Early Modern world has been almost incalculable. But the Codex has not, until now, been credibly translated into English. This translation, with a facing Latin and Greek text (from Paul Kruger's ninth edition of the Codex), is based on one made by Justice Fred Blume in the 1920s, but left unpublished for almost a century. It is accompanied by introductions explaining the background of the translation, a bibliography and glossary, and notes that help in understanding the text. Anyone with an interest in the Codex, whether an interested novice or a professional historian, will find ample assistance here"--
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Two Introductory Constitutions to Justinian's Digest

Author: Tammo Wallinga

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Digesta

Page: 158

View: 5904

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Author: Michael Maas

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1139826875

Category: History

Page: N.A

View: 6468

This book introduces the Age of Justinian, the last Roman century and the first flowering of Byzantine culture. Dominated by the policies and personality of emperor Justinian I (527–565), this period of grand achievements and far-reaching failures witnessed the transformation of the Mediterranean world. In this volume, twenty specialists explore the most important aspects of the age including the mechanics and theory of empire, warfare, urbanism, and economy. It also discusses the impact of the great plague, the codification of Roman law, and the many religious upheavals taking place at the time. Consideration is given to imperial relations with the papacy, northern barbarians, the Persians, and other eastern peoples, shedding new light on a dramatic and highly significant historical period.
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Author: Justinian I

Publisher: Lulu Press, Inc

ISBN: 1329002555

Category: Law

Page: N.A

View: 6695

The Corpus Juris Civilis or the Body of Civil Law was Complied from 529 to 534 by order of Justinian I; thus, it is sometimes referred to as the Code of Justinian. It however contains the body Roman law previous to the reign of Justinian. This compilation, translated by S.P. Scott into English, and formatted into Three volumes, contains: The Twelve Tables, The Institutes of Gaius, The Rules of Ulpian, The Opinions of Paulus, The Enactments of Justinian, and The Constitutions of Leo
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