Re-evaluating Traditional Environmental Knowledge

Author: Serena Heckler

Publisher: Berghahn Books

ISBN: 0857456148

Category: Social Science

Page: 304

View: 4362

In recent years, the field of study variously called local, indigenous or traditional environmental knowledge (TEK) has experienced a crisis brought about by the questioning of some of its basic assumptions. This has included reassessing notions that scientific methods can accurately elicit and describe TEK or that incorporating it into development projects will improve the physical, social or economic well-being of marginalized peoples. The contributors to this volume argue that to accurately and appropriately describe TEK, the historical and political forces that have shaped it, as well as people’s day-to-day engagement with the landscape around them must be taken into account. TEK thus emerges, not as an easily translatable tool for development experts, but as a rich and complex element of contemporary lives that should be defined and managed by indigenous and local peoples themselves.
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Concepts of Biotic and Physical Space

Author: Leslie M. Johnson,Eugene S. Hunn

Publisher: Berghahn Books

ISBN: 9781845456139

Category: Science

Page: 319

View: 4317

Although anthropologists and cultural geographers have explored "place" in various senses, little cross-cultural examination of "kinds of place," or ecotopes, has been presented from an ethno-ecological perspective. In this volume, indigenous and local understandings of landscape are investigated in order to better understand how human communities relate to their terrestrial and aquatic resources. The contributors go beyond the traditional ecological knowledge (TEK) literature and offer valuable insights on ecology and on land and resources management, emphasizing the perception of landscape above the level of species and their folk classification. Focusing on the ways traditional people perceive and manage land and biotic resources within diverse regional and cultural settings, the contributors address theoretical issues and present case studies from North America, Mexico, Amazonia, tropical Asia, Africa and Europe.
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Author: Saeed, Saqib

Publisher: IGI Global

ISBN: 146666486X

Category: Computers

Page: 354

View: 7970

Computer programs and processes that take into account the goals and needs of the user meet with the greatest success, so it behooves software engineers to consider the human element inherent in every line of code they write. Human Factors in Software Development and Design brings together high quality research on the influence and impact of ordinary people on the software industry. With the goal of improving the quality and usability of computer technologies, this premier reference is intended for students and practitioners of software engineering as well as researchers, educators, and interested laymen.
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Concepts and Cases

Author: Julian Inglis,International Program on Traditional Ecological Knowledge,International Development Research Centre (Canada)

Publisher: IDRC

ISBN: 0889366837

Category: Science

Page: 142

View: 7902

Traditional Ecological Knowledge: Concepts and cases
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Author: Ulysses Paulino Albuquerque,Reinaldo Farias Paiva Lucena,Luiz Vital Fernandes Cruz da Cunha,Rômulo Romeu Nóbrega Alves

Publisher: Humana Press

ISBN: 9781493989188

Category: Science

Page: 342

View: 8350

Ethnobiology and ethnoecology have become very popular in recent years. Particularly in the last 20 years, many manuals of methods have published the most classical approaches to the subject. There have been, however, many advances in research as a result of interaction with different disciplines, but also due to more recent results, new original and interesting questions. This handbook provides the current state of the art methods and techniques in ethnobiology and ethnoecology, and related fields. This new volume, besides bringing new and original aspects of what is found in the literature, fills some of the gaps in volume one by including the most systematic and extensive treatment of methods and techniques in qualitative research. Along with the various methods covered in the individual chapters, the handbook also includes an extensive bibliography that details the current literature in the field.
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Resource Management, Values and Local Livelihoods

Author: Anthony B. Cunningham,Xuefei Yang

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 113653816X

Category: Nature

Page: 240

View: 8141

Many mushrooms - or the 'fruits of fungi' - are extremely valuable, wild-gathered products which are utilised for both their medicinal properties and as food. In many of the world's tropical and temperate forests, they are the primary source of income for the people who live there. These forests range from temperate woodlands and small forests to high altitude forests in the Himalaya and tropical miombo woodlands in south-central Africa. In south-west China, over 200 species of wild fungi in 64 genera are commercially traded while in Europe and North America, woodlands and small forests are the source of many highly-prized mushrooms and an essential resource for many small enterprises and collectors. Yet the increased demand for timber has resulted in the rapid expansion of forestry, which in turn has destroyed the natural habitat of many fungi, unbalancing both forest economics and ecology. Despite the economic, social and cultural values of fungi, there is a general lack of understanding of their importance to local livelihoods and forest ecology. This book aims to fill this gap and extends the People and Plants Conservation Series beyond the plant kingdom into the related world of fungi and mushrooms. It demonstrates the crucial roles that fungi play in maintaining forest ecosystems and the livelihoods of rural people throughout the world while providing good practice guidelines for the sustainable management of this resource and an assessment of economic value. It brings together the perspectives of biologists, anthropologists and forest and woodland managers to provide a unique inter-disciplinary and international overview of the key issues.
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A Critical Synthesis

Author: Roy Ellen,Stephen J. Lycett,Sarah E. Johns

Publisher: Berghahn Books

ISBN: 0857459945

Category: Social Science

Page: 392

View: 5244

The concept of "cultural transmission" is central to much contemporary anthropological theory, since successful human reproduction through social systems is essential for effective survival and for enhancing the adaptiveness of individual humans and local populations. Yet, what is understood by the phrase and how it might best be studied is highly contested. This book brings together contributions that reflect the current diversity of approaches - from the fields of biology, primatology, palaeoanthropology, psychology, social anthropology, ethnobiology, and archaeology - to examine social and cultural transmission from a range of perspectives and at different scales of generalization. The comprehensive introduction explores some of the problems and connections. Overall, the book provides a timely synthesis of current accounts of cultural transmission in relation to cognitive process, practical action, and local socio-ecological context, while linking these with explanations of longer-term evolutionary trajectories.
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Social Science Methods and Practice

Author: Helen Newing

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1136934391

Category: Science

Page: 400

View: 2716

Conducting Research in Conservation is the first textbook on social science research methods written specifically for use in the expanding and increasingly multidisciplinary field of environmental conservation. The first section on planning a research project includes chapters on the need for social science research in conservation, defining a research topic, methodology, and sampling. Section two focuses on practical issues in carrying out fieldwork with local communities, from fieldwork preparation and data collection to the relationships between the researcher and the study community. Section three provides an in-depth focus on a range of social science methods including standard qualitative and quantitative methods such as participant observation, interviewing and questionnaires, and more advanced methods, such as ethnobiological methods for documenting local environmental knowledge and change, and participatory methods such as the ‘PRA’ toolbox. Section four then demonstrates how to analyze social science data qualitatively and quantitatively; and the final section outlines the writing-up process and what should happen after the end of the formal research project. This book is a comprehensive and accessible guide to social science research methods for students of conservation related subjects and practitioners trained in the natural sciences. It features practical worldwide examples of conservation-related research in different ecosystems such as forests; grasslands; marine and riverine systems; and farmland. Boxes provide definitions of key terms, practical tips, and brief narratives from students and practitioners describe the practical issues that they have faced in the field.
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Author: Ajayi, O.C. (ed),Mafongoya, P.L. (ed)

Publisher: CTA

ISBN: 9290816198

Category: Science

Page: 316

View: 3411

Climate change presents a profound challenge to food security and sustainable development in Africa. Its negative impacts are likely to be greatest in the African region, which is already food insecure. In the face of global climate change and its emerging challenges and unknowns, it is essential that decision makers base policies on the best available knowledge. In recent years, the knowledge of local and indigenous people, often referred to as indigenous knowledge (IK) has been increasingly recognised as an important source of climate knowledge and adaptation strategies.
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Anthropological Perspectives

Author: Philippe Descola,Gisli Palsson

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1134827156

Category: Social Science

Page: 320

View: 2733

The contributors to this book focus on the relationship between nature and society from a variety of theoretical and ethnographic perspectives. Their work draws upon recent developments in social theory, biology, ethnobiology, epistemology, sociology of science, and a wide array of ethnographic case studies -- from Amazonia, the Solomon Islands, Malaysia, the Mollucan Islands, rural comunities from Japan and north-west Europe, urban Greece, and laboratories of molecular biology and high-energy physics. The discussion is divided into three parts, emphasising the problems posed by the nature-culture dualism, some misguided attempts to respond to these problems, and potential avenues out of the current dilemmas of ecological discourse.
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Author: Charles R. Menzies

Publisher: U of Nebraska Press

ISBN: 9780803207356

Category: Education

Page: 281

View: 2563

Traditional Ecological Knowledge and Natural Resource Management examines how traditional ecological knowledge (TEK) is taught and practiced today among Native communities. Of special interest is the complex relationship between indigenous ecological practices and other ways of interacting with the environment, particularly regional and national programs of natural resource management. Focusing primarily on the northwest coast of North America, scholars look at the challenges and opportunities confronting the local practice of indigenous ecological knowledge in a range of communities, including the Tsimshian, the Nisga’a, the Tlingit, the Gitksan, the Kwagult, the Sto:lo, and the northern Dene in the Yukon. The experts consider how traditional knowledge is taught and learned and address the cultural importance of different subsistence practices using natural elements such as seaweed (Gitga’a), pine mushrooms (Tsimshian), and salmon (Tlingit). Several contributors discuss the extent to which national and regional programs of resource management need to include models of TEK in their planning and execution. This volume highlights the different ways of seeing and engaging with the natural world and underscores the need to acknowledge and honor the ways that indigenous peoples have done so for generations.
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Knowledge Binds and Institutional Conflicts

Author: Anne Ross

Publisher: Left Coast Press

ISBN: 1598745786

Category: Political Science

Page: 320

View: 7384

Comprehensive and global in scope, this book critically evaluates the range of management options that claim to have integrated Indigenous peoples and knowledge, and then outline an innovative, alternative model of co-management, the Indigenous Stewardship Model.
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Bioregionalism, Permaculture, and Ecovillages

Author: Joshua Lockyer,James R. Veteto

Publisher: Berghahn Books

ISBN: 0857458809

Category: Nature

Page: 348

View: 8899

In order to move global society towards a sustainable "ecotopia," solutions must be engaged in specific places and communities, and the authors here argue for re-orienting environmental anthropology from a problem-oriented towards a solutions-focused endeavor. Using case studies from around the world, the contributors-scholar-activists and activist-practitioners- examine the interrelationships between three prominent environmental social movements: bioregionalism, a worldview and political ecology that grounds environmental action and experience; permaculture, a design science for putting the bioregional vision into action; and ecovillages, the ever-dynamic settings for creating sustainable local cultures.
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Author: Ulysses Paulino Albuquerque,Patrícia Muniz De Medeiros,Alejandro Casas

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 331919917X

Category: Science

Page: 204

View: 7210

Ethnobiology is a fascinating science. To understand this vocation it needs to be studied under an evolutionary point of view that is very strong and significant, although this aspect is often poorly approached in the literature. This is the first book to compile and discuss information about evolutionary ethnobiology in English.
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Author: Clifford Geertz

Publisher: Basic Books

ISBN: 0465093566

Category: Social Science

Page: 576

View: 3203

In The Interpretation of Cultures, the most original anthropologist of his generation moved far beyond the traditional confines of his discipline to develop an important new concept of culture. This groundbreaking book, winner of the 1974 Sorokin Award of the American Sociological Association, helped define for an entire generation of anthropologists what their field is ultimately about.
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A Methods Manual

Author: Gary J. Martin

Publisher: Earthscan

ISBN: 1844070840

Category: Nature

Page: 268

View: 4903

Aviation is integral to the global economy but it is also one of the main obstacles to environmentally sustainable development. It is one of the world's fastest growing - and most polluting - industries. What can be done to retain the economic and other b
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Approaches to Development and Human Well-being

Author: Suneetha M. Subramanian,Balakrishna Pisupati

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9789280811919

Category: Political Science

Page: 373

View: 8584

Traditional knowledge (TK), the longstanding traditions and practices of certain communities, has contributed immensely to shaping development and human well-being. Its influence spans a variety of sectors, including agriculture, health, education, and governance. However, TK is increasingly underrepresented or underutilized. And, while the applicability of TK to human and environmental welfare is well recognized, collated information on how TK contributes to different sectors is not easily accessible. This book focuses on the relevance of TK to key environment-and development-related sectors. It discusses the current debates within each of these sectors and presents suggestions as to how TK can be effectively integrated with conventional science and policy. A valuable resource to researchers, academics, and policymakers, Traditional Knowledge in Policy and Practice provides a comprehensive overview of TK and its links and contributions to social, economic, environmental, ethical, and political issues. "This collection, which comprises chapters by experts from a wide range of backgrounds, including traditional knowledge-holding communities, should leave policymakers in no doubt that protecting TK is not only vital for indigenous peoples but for the common future of all of humanity."—Graham Dutfield, professor of international governance, School of Law, University of Leeds
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Myth and History

Author: Shepard Krech

Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company

ISBN: 9780393321005

Category: History

Page: 318

View: 9510

Challenging many sacrosanct notions about the relationship between Native Americans and nature, the author discusses the possible role of Pleistocene-era humans in eradicating the mastodon, over-irrigation of crops among the Hohokam of Arizona, and slash-and-burn farming techniques. Reprint. 10,000 first printing.
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