Author: Jill Harries

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1316582957

Category: History

Page: N.A

View: 1896

What was crime in ancient Rome? Was it defined by law or social attitudes? How did damage to the individual differ from offences against the community as a whole? This book explores competing legal and extra-legal discourses in a number of areas, including theft, official malpractice, treason, sexual misconduct, crimes of violence, homicide, magic and perceptions of deviance. It argues that court practice was responsive to social change, despite the ingrained conservatism of the legal tradition, and that judges and litigants were in part responsible for the harsher operation of justice in Late Antiquity. Consideration is also given to how attitudes to crime were shaped not only by legal experts but also by the rhetorical education and practices of advocates, and by popular and even elite indifference to the finer points of law.
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Author: Andrew M. Riggsby

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 052168711X

Category: History

Page: 283

View: 6563

In this book, Andrew Riggsby surveys the main areas of Roman law, and their place in Roman life.
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Homicide and Power in the Roman Republic

Author: Judy E. Gaughan

Publisher: University of Texas Press

ISBN: 0292721110

Category: History

Page: 194

View: 2376

Embarking on a unique study of Roman criminal law, Judy Gaughan has developed a novel understanding of the nature of social and political power dynamics in republican government. Revealing the significant relationship between political power and attitudes toward homicide in the Roman republic, Murder Was Not a Crime describes a legal system through which families (rather than the government) were given the power to mete out punishment for murder. With implications that could modify the most fundamental beliefs about the Roman republic, Gaughan's research maintains that Roman criminal law did not contain a specific enactment against murder, although it had done so prior to the overthrow of the monarchy. While kings felt an imperative to hold monopoly over the power to kill, Gaughan argues, the republic phase ushered in a form of decentralized government that did not see itself as vulnerable to challenge by an act of murder. And the power possessed by individual families ensured that the government would not attain the responsibility for punishing homicidal violence. Drawing on surviving Roman laws and literary sources, Murder Was Not a Crime also explores the dictator Sulla's "murder law," arguing that it lacked any government concept of murder and was instead simply a collection of earlier statutes repressing poisoning, arson, and the carrying of weapons. Reinterpreting a spectrum of scenarios, Gaughan makes new distinctions between the paternal head of household and his power over life and death, versus the power of consuls and praetors to command and kill.
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Author: Richard A. Bauman

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1134823932

Category: History

Page: 240

View: 6489

First Published in 2004. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.
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Author: Clifford Ando,Paul J du Plessis,Kaius Tuori

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0191044423

Category: History

Page: 650

View: 538

The Handbook is intended to survey the landscape of contemporary research and chart principal directions of future inquiry. Its aim is to bring to bear upon Roman legal study the full range of intellectual resources of contemporary legal history, from comparison to popular constitutionalism, from international private law to law and society. This unique contribution of the volumesets it apart from others in the field. Furthermore, the volume brings the study of Roman law into closer alignment, and thus into dialogue, with historical, sociological, and anthropological research in law in other periods. The volume is therefore directed not simply to ancient historians and legal historians already focused on the ancient world, but to historians of all periods interested in law and its complex and multifaceted relationship to society.
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Religious Violence in the Christian Roman Empire

Author: Michael Gaddis

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN: 0520241045

Category: History

Page: 396

View: 807

Focusing on the 4th and 5th centuries, Michael Gaddis explores how various groups employed the language of religious violence to construct their own identities, to undermine the legitimacy of their rivals, & to advance themselves in the competitive & high stakes process of Christianizing the Roman Empire.
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Author: Paul J du Plessis

Publisher: Edinburgh University Press

ISBN: 0748668195

Category: Law

Page: 256

View: 3063

An interdisciplinary, edited collection on social science methodologies for approaching Roman legal sources. Roman law as a field of study is rapidly evolving to reflect new perspectives and approaches in research. Scholars who work on the subject are i
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Soldiers, Administration, and Public Order

Author: Christopher J. Fuhrmann

Publisher: OUP USA

ISBN: 0199737843

Category: History

Page: 330

View: 4072

Drawing on a wide variety of source material from art archaeology, administrative documents, Egyptian papyri, laws Jewish and Christian religious texts and ancient narratives this book provides a comprehensive overview of Roman imperial policing practices.
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Author: Olivia F. Robinson

Publisher: JHU Press

ISBN: 9780801867576

Category: History

Page: 212

View: 1038

Although the Romans lived in a society very different from ours, they were like us in fearing crime and in hoping to control it by means of the law. Ordinary citizens wanted protection from muggers in the streets or thieves at the public baths. They demanded laws to punish officials who abused power or embezzled public monies. Even emperors, who feared plotters and wanted to repress subversive ideas and doctrines, looked to the law for protection. In the first book in English to focus on the substantive criminal law of ancient Rome, O. F. Robinson offers a lively study of an essential aspect of Roman life and identity. Robinson begins with a discussion of the framework within which the law operated and the nature of criminal responsibility. She looks at the criminal law of Rome as it was established in the late Republic under Sulla's system of standing jury-courts. Grouping offenses functionally into five chapters, she examines crimes committed for gain, crimes involving violence, sexual offenses, offenses against the state, and offenses against the due ordering of society.
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Author: Jill Harries

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9780521422734

Category: History

Page: 246

View: 496

The first systematic historical treatment in English of public law in the later Roman Empire.
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Author: Paul J du Plessis

Publisher: Edinburgh University Press

ISBN: 0748668195

Category: Law

Page: 256

View: 5903

An interdisciplinary, edited collection on social science methodologies for approaching Roman legal sources. Roman law as a field of study is rapidly evolving to reflect new perspectives and approaches in research. Scholars who work on the subject are i
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Author: Jill Harries

Publisher: Edinburgh University Press

ISBN: 0748653953

Category: History

Page: 384

View: 4232

This book is about the reinvention of the Roman Empire during the eighty years between the accession of Diocletian and the death of Julian.
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Author: Marcus Tullius Cicero

Publisher: Penguin

ISBN: 9780140442885

Category: History

Page: 367

View: 3185

Cicero's speeches "In Defence of Sextus Roscius of Amerina," "In Defence of Aulus Cluentius Habitus," "In Defence of Gaius Rabirius," "Note on the Speeches in Defence of Caelius and Milo," and "In Defence of King Deiotarus" provide insight into Roman life, law, and history.
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Author: John Bauschatz

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1107037131

Category: History

Page: 415

View: 2652

This book investigates the law enforcement system of Ptolemaic Egypt (323-30 BC).
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Author: Scott Fitzgerald Johnson

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0199996334

Category: History

Page: 1296

View: 5869

The Oxford Handbook of Late Antiquity offers an innovative overview of a period (c. 300-700 CE) that has become increasingly central to scholarly debates over the history of western and Middle Eastern civilizations. This volume covers such pivotal events as the fall of Rome, the rise of Christianity, the origins of Islam, and the early formation of Byzantium and the European Middle Ages. These events are set in the context of widespread literary, artistic, cultural, and religious change during the period. The geographical scope of this Handbook is unparalleled among comparable surveys of Late Antiquity; Arabia, Egypt, Central Asia, and the Balkans all receive dedicated treatments, while the scope extends to the western kingdoms, and North Africa in the West. Furthermore, from economic theory and slavery to Greek and Latin poetry, Syriac and Coptic literature, sites of religious devotion, and many others, this Handbook covers a wide range of topics that will appeal to scholars from a diverse array of disciplines. The Oxford Handbook of Late Antiquity engages the perennially valuable questions about the end of the ancient world and the beginning of the medieval, while providing a much-needed touchstone for the study of Late Antiquity itself.
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Roman Provincial Governors in Luke-Acts

Author: Joshua Yoder

Publisher: Walter de Gruyter GmbH & Co KG

ISBN: 3110391422

Category: Religion

Page: 380

View: 7757

This book examines Luke’s depiction of the Roman provincial governors in his narrative, interpreted in terms of his Greco-Roman literary context. Luke’s portrait of these Roman authority figures is relatively critical, and demonstrates his preoccupation with Rome’s judgment of the Christians more than a desire to commend Roman rule.
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Author: Christer Bruun,Jonathan Edmondson

Publisher: Oxford Handbooks

ISBN: 0195336461

Category: Art

Page: 888

View: 9929

"Inscriptions are for anyone interested in the Roman world and Roman culture, whether they regard themselves as literary scholars, historians, archaeologists, anthropologists, religious scholars or work in a field that touches on the Roman world from c. 500 BCE to 500 CE and beyond. The goal of The Oxford Handbook of Roman Epigraphy is to show why inscriptions matter and to demonstrate to classicists and ancient historians, their graduate students, and advanced undergraduates, how to work with epigraphic sources"--
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Organizational Aspects 27 BC-AD 235

Author: Alfred Michael Hirt

Publisher: Oxford University Press on Demand

ISBN: 0199572879

Category: History

Page: 551

View: 5020

The control over marble and metal resources was of major importance to the Roman Empire. Alfred Hirt's comprehensive study defines the organizational outlines and the internal structures of the mining and quarrying ventures under imperial control.
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