Author: Jill Harries

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1316582957

Category: History

Page: N.A

View: 3131

What was crime in ancient Rome? Was it defined by law or social attitudes? How did damage to the individual differ from offences against the community as a whole? This book explores competing legal and extra-legal discourses in a number of areas, including theft, official malpractice, treason, sexual misconduct, crimes of violence, homicide, magic and perceptions of deviance. It argues that court practice was responsive to social change, despite the ingrained conservatism of the legal tradition, and that judges and litigants were in part responsible for the harsher operation of justice in Late Antiquity. Consideration is also given to how attitudes to crime were shaped not only by legal experts but also by the rhetorical education and practices of advocates, and by popular and even elite indifference to the finer points of law.
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Author: Andrew M. Riggsby

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 052168711X

Category: History

Page: 283

View: 6587

In this book, Andrew Riggsby surveys the main areas of Roman law, and their place in Roman life.
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Author: Olivia F. Robinson

Publisher: JHU Press

ISBN: 9780801867576

Category: History

Page: 212

View: 9877

Although the Romans lived in a society very different from ours, they were like us in fearing crime and in hoping to control it by means of the law. Ordinary citizens wanted protection from muggers in the streets or thieves at the public baths. They demanded laws to punish officials who abused power or embezzled public monies. Even emperors, who feared plotters and wanted to repress subversive ideas and doctrines, looked to the law for protection. In the first book in English to focus on the substantive criminal law of ancient Rome, O. F. Robinson offers a lively study of an essential aspect of Roman life and identity. Robinson begins with a discussion of the framework within which the law operated and the nature of criminal responsibility. She looks at the criminal law of Rome as it was established in the late Republic under Sulla's system of standing jury-courts. Grouping offenses functionally into five chapters, she examines crimes committed for gain, crimes involving violence, sexual offenses, offenses against the state, and offenses against the due ordering of society.
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Author: Apuleius

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Magic

Page: 376

View: 6795

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Author: C. E. Brand

Publisher: University of Texas Press

ISBN: 029274224X

Category: Law

Page: 262

View: 8346

Rome was the law-giver for much of the modern world. She was also the greatest military power of antiquity, operating her military organization with remarkable efficiency and effectiveness throughout most of the then-known world. In view of the importance of both the legal and military aspects of the Roman Empire, an account of their combination in a system of disciplinary control for the Roman armies is of considerable significance to historians in both fields—and, in fact, to scholars in general. In Roman Military Law, C. E. Brand describes this system of control. Since a characterization of such a system can be made most meaningful only against a background of Roman constitutional government and in the light of ideologies current at the time, Brand follows his initial “Note on Sources” with a sketch of the contemporary Roman scene. This first section includes a discussion of the Roman constitution and an examination of Roman criminal law. The history of Rome, as a republic, principate, and empire, extended over a period of a thousand years, so any attempt to represent a generalized picture must be essentially a matter of extraction and condensation from the voluminous literature of the whole era. Nevertheless, from the fantastic evolution that is the history of Rome, Brand has been able to construct a more or less static historical mosaic that may be considered typically “Roman.” This comes into sharpest focus during the period of the Punic Wars, when the city and its people were most intensely Roman. The picture of the Roman armies is set into this basic framework, in chapters dealing with military organization, disciplinary organization, religion and discipline, and offenses and punishments. The final section of the book considers briefly the vast changes in Roman institutions that came about under the armies of the Empire, and then concludes with the Latin text and an English translation of the only known code of Roman military justice, promulgated sometime during the later Empire, preserved in Byzantine literature, and handed down to medieval times in Latin translations of Byzantine Greek law, which it has heretofore been confused.
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Author: Paul J du Plessis

Publisher: Edinburgh University Press

ISBN: 0748668195

Category: Law

Page: 256

View: 4997

An interdisciplinary, edited collection on social science methodologies for approaching Roman legal sources. Roman law as a field of study is rapidly evolving to reflect new perspectives and approaches in research. Scholars who work on the subject are i
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Author: Jill Harries

Publisher: Edinburgh University Press

ISBN: 0748653953

Category: History

Page: 384

View: 3764

This book is about the reinvention of the Roman Empire during the eighty years between the accession of Diocletian and the death of Julian.
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Author: Scott Fitzgerald Johnson

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0199996334

Category: History

Page: 1296

View: 4008

The Oxford Handbook of Late Antiquity offers an innovative overview of a period (c. 300-700 CE) that has become increasingly central to scholarly debates over the history of western and Middle Eastern civilizations. This volume covers such pivotal events as the fall of Rome, the rise of Christianity, the origins of Islam, and the early formation of Byzantium and the European Middle Ages. These events are set in the context of widespread literary, artistic, cultural, and religious change during the period. The geographical scope of this Handbook is unparalleled among comparable surveys of Late Antiquity; Arabia, Egypt, Central Asia, and the Balkans all receive dedicated treatments, while the scope extends to the western kingdoms, and North Africa in the West. Furthermore, from economic theory and slavery to Greek and Latin poetry, Syriac and Coptic literature, sites of religious devotion, and many others, this Handbook covers a wide range of topics that will appeal to scholars from a diverse array of disciplines. The Oxford Handbook of Late Antiquity engages the perennially valuable questions about the end of the ancient world and the beginning of the medieval, while providing a much-needed touchstone for the study of Late Antiquity itself.
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Author: Richard Alston,Keith Hopwood

Publisher: Classical Press of Wales

ISBN: N.A

Category: History

Page: 278

View: 5067

What are states but large bandit bands, and what are bandit bands but small states? So asked St Augustine, reflecting on the late Roman world. Here nine original studies, by historians of Greece and Rome, explore the activities and the images of ancient criminals, comparing them closely and provocatively with the Greek and Roman governments which the criminals challenged.
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Soldiers, Administration, and Public Order

Author: Christopher J. Fuhrmann

Publisher: OUP USA

ISBN: 0199737843

Category: History

Page: 330

View: 8741

Drawing on a wide variety of source material from art archaeology, administrative documents, Egyptian papyri, laws Jewish and Christian religious texts and ancient narratives this book provides a comprehensive overview of Roman imperial policing practices.
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Author: Jill Harries

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9780521422734

Category: History

Page: 246

View: 5778

The first systematic historical treatment in English of public law in the later Roman Empire.
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Author: Melissa Barden Dowling

Publisher: University of Michigan Press

ISBN: 9780472115150

Category: History

Page: 366

View: 5427

This book explores the formation of clemency as a human and social value in the Roman Empire.
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Author: Richard Dargie

Publisher: Capstone

ISBN: 9780756520847

Category: Juvenile Nonfiction

Page: 32

View: 5807

Describes the various kinds of punishment, including exile and execution, that were given for such crimes as theft, assault, impiety, and murder in ancient Greece.
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C.680-850

Author: M. T. G. Humphreys

Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA

ISBN: 0198701578

Category: History

Page: 312

View: 1663

Law was central to the ancient Roman conception of themselves and their empire. Yet what happened to Roman law and the position it occupied ideologically during the turbulent years of the Iconoclast era, c.680-850, is seldom explored and little understood. This volume uses Roman law and canon law to chart the various responses to these changing times - especially the rise of Islam, from Justinian II's Christocentric monarchy to the Old Testament-inspired Isauriandynasty - and the transformation from the late antique Roman Empire to medieval Byzantium.
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Author: Ruth Mazo Karras,Joel Kaye,E. Ann Matter

Publisher: University of Pennsylvania Press

ISBN: 9780812240801

Category: History

Page: 315

View: 840

In the popular imagination, the Middle Ages are often associated with lawlessness. However, historians have long recognized that medieval culture was characterized by an enormous respect for law and legal procedure. This book makes the case that one cannot understand the era's cultural trends without considering the profound development of law.
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Cases and Laws in France, England, and Germany : 500-1500

Author: Hunt Janin

Publisher: McFarland

ISBN: 9780786418411

Category: Law

Page: 225

View: 9914

Discusses the types of justice administered in medieval times, how geography and religion shaped it, and its legacy in modern times.
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