Author: Jill Harries

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9780521422734

Category: History

Page: 246

View: 8463

The first systematic historical treatment in English of public law in the later Roman Empire.
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Author: Antti Arjava

Publisher: Oxford University Press on Demand

ISBN: 9780198152330

Category: Law

Page: 304

View: 3218

This is the first comprehensive account of women's legal and social positions in the west from classical antiquity right through to the early middle ages. The main focus of the book is on the late antique period, with constant reference to classical Roman law and the lives of women in the early empire. The book goes on to follow women's history up to the seventh century, thus bridging the notorious gap of the 'dark ages'. Major themes include daughters' succession rights; the independenceof married women; sexual relations outside marriage; divorce; remarriage; and the general legal capacity of women. Antti Arjava argues that from the viewpoint of most women, late antiquity was not a period of radical change. In particular, the influence of Christianity has often been considerably exaggerated. It was only after the fall of the Western empire that a new legal system and a new social world emerged.
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the Emperor Constantine's marriage legislation

Author: Judith Evans Grubbs

Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA

ISBN: 9780198208228

Category: History

Page: 400

View: 5098

This is a new and thought-provoking study of law and marriage in late antiquity, dealing particularly with the legislation on marriage enacted by the Roman emperor Constantine (AD 307-337). As the first emperor to accept Christianity, Constantine is often credited with having introduced Christian ideals and practices into Roman law, but in this book the author argues that the extent of Christian influence on Constantine's marriage legislation was limited. Rather, in many cases, it merely granted legal recognition to practices that had long been followed by many people in the Roman Empire. Whilst Constantine did not always endorse such practices, and in some cases even tried to repress them, a careful examination of his laws against the dual background of classical Roman law and early Christian attitudes towards marriage reveals much about contemporary behaviour and belief in late antiquity.
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Author: Ralph W. Mathisen

Publisher: Oxford University Press on Demand

ISBN: 9780199240326

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 324

View: 8194

These sixteen studies consider the interrelationship between social change and the development of new kinds of law and authority during Late Antiquity (260-640 AD). They provide new ways of looking at both the law and the society of this period, in the context of the kinds of impacts that each had on the other against the backdrop of the manifestations of new kinds of authority.
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Author: Jill Harries

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1316582957

Category: History

Page: N.A

View: 4930

What was crime in ancient Rome? Was it defined by law or social attitudes? How did damage to the individual differ from offences against the community as a whole? This book explores competing legal and extra-legal discourses in a number of areas, including theft, official malpractice, treason, sexual misconduct, crimes of violence, homicide, magic and perceptions of deviance. It argues that court practice was responsive to social change, despite the ingrained conservatism of the legal tradition, and that judges and litigants were in part responsible for the harsher operation of justice in Late Antiquity. Consideration is also given to how attitudes to crime were shaped not only by legal experts but also by the rhetorical education and practices of advocates, and by popular and even elite indifference to the finer points of law.
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Author: Caroline Humfress

Publisher: Oxford University Press on Demand

ISBN: 0198208413

Category: History

Page: 344

View: 6816

Approaching the subject of late Roman law from the perspective of legal practice revealed in courtroom processes, Caroline Humfress argues for a vibrant culture of forensic argumentation in late Antiquity - which included Christian controversies concerning 'heresy' and 'orthodoxy', revealing its far-reaching effects on theological debate.
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A Sourcebook on Marriage, Divorce and Widowhood

Author: Judith Evans Grubbs

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1134743920

Category: History

Page: 376

View: 2905

It is widely recognized that Roman law is an important source of information about women in the Roman world, and can present a more rounded and accurate picture than literary sources. This sourcebook fully exploits the rich legal material of the imperial period - from Augustus (31 BCE - 14 CE) to the end of the western Roman Empire (476 CE), incorporating both pagan and Christian eras, and explaining the rights women held under Roman law, the restrictions to which they were subject, and legal regulations on marriage, divorce and widowhood.
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Authorship, Law, and Transmission in Jewish and Christian Tradition

Author: A.J. Berkovitz,Mark Letteney

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1351063405

Category: History

Page: 226

View: 6479

The historian’s task involves unmasking the systems of power that underlie our sources. A historian must not only analyze the content and context of ancient sources, but also the structures of power, authority, and political contingency that account for their transmission, preservation, and survival. But as a tool for interpreting antiquity, "authority" has a history of its own. As authority gained pride of place in the historiographical order of knowledge, other types of contingency have faded into the background. This book’s introduction traces the genesis and growth of the category, describing the lacuna that scholars seek to fill by framing texts through its lens. The subsequent chapters comprise case studies from late ancient Christian and Jewish sources, asking what lies "beyond authority" as a primary tool of analysis. Each uncovers facets of textual and social history that have been obscured by overreliance on authority as historical explanation. While chapters focus on late ancient topics, the methodological intervention speaks to the discipline of history as a whole. Scholars of classical antiquity and the early medieval world will find immediately analogous cases and applications. Furthermore, the critique of the place of authority as used by historians will find wider resonance across the academic study of history.
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Rethinking the Roman Empire in Late Antiquity

Author: Christopher Kelly

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 110727690X

Category: History

Page: N.A

View: 5508

Theodosius II (AD 408–450) was the longest reigning Roman emperor. Ever since Edward Gibbon, he has been dismissed as mediocre and ineffectual. Yet Theodosius ruled an empire which retained its integrity while the West was broken up by barbarian invasions. This book explores Theodosius' challenges and successes. Ten essays by leading scholars of late antiquity provide important new insights into the court at Constantinople, the literary and cultural vitality of the reign, and the presentation of imperial piety and power. Much attention has been directed towards the changes promoted by Constantine at the beginning of the fourth century; much less to their crystallisation under Theodosius II. This volume explores the working out of new conceptions of the Roman Empire - its history, its rulers and its God. A substantial introduction offers a new framework for thinking afresh about the long transition from the classical world to Byzantium.
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Ideas, Practices, Actors

Author: N.A

Publisher: BRILL

ISBN: 9004249516

Category: Political Science

Page: 360

View: 2384

Law and Empire relates the principles of legal thinking in Chinese, Islamic, and European contexts to practices of lawmaking and adjudication. It shows how legal procedure and legal thinking could be used in strikingly different ways.
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Perceptions and Practices

Author: Harold Allen Drake

Publisher: Ashgate Publishing, Ltd.

ISBN: 9780754654988

Category: History

Page: 395

View: 1393

Violence in Late Antiquity brings together a selection of the papers delivered at the fifth biennial 'Shifting Frontiers' conference with others specially commissioned for the volume. The four sections on Defining Violence, 'Legitimate' Violence, Violence
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Author: Scott Johnson

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 019027753X

Category: Byzantine Empire

Page: 1296

View: 4643

The Oxford Handbook of Late Antiquity offers an innovative overview of a period (c. 300-700 CE) that has become increasingly central to scholarly debates over the history of western and Middle Eastern civilizations. This volume covers such pivotal events as the fall of Rome, the rise of Christianity, the origins of Islam, and the early formation of Byzantium and the European Middle Ages. These events are set in the context of widespread literary, artistic, cultural, and religious change during the period. The geographical scope of this Handbook is unparalleled among comparable surveys of Late Antiquity; Arabia, Egypt, Central Asia, and the Balkans all receive dedicated treatments, while the scope extends to the western kingdoms, and North Africa in the West. Furthermore, from economic theory and slavery to Greek and Latin poetry, Syriac and Coptic literature, sites of religious devotion, and many others, this Handbook covers a wide range of topics that will appeal to scholars from a diverse array of disciplines. The Oxford Handbook of Late Antiquity engages the perennially valuable questions about the end of the ancient world and the beginning of the medieval, while providing a much-needed touchstone for the study of Late Antiquity itself.
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A Political and Military History

Author: Hugh Elton

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9781108456319

Category: History

Page: 366

View: 1400

In this volume, Hugh Elton offers a detailed and up to date history of the last centuries of the Roman Empire. Beginning with the crisis of the third century, he covers the rise of Christianity, the key Church Councils, the fall of the West to the Barbarians, the Justinianic reconquest, and concludes with the twin wars against Persians and Arabs in the seventh century AD. Elton isolates two major themes that emerge in this period. He notes that a new form of decision-making was created, whereby committees debated civil, military, and religious matters before the emperor, who was the final arbiter. Elton also highlights the evolution of the relationship between aristocrats and the Empire, and provides new insights into the mechanics of administering the Empire, as well as frontier and military policies. Supported by primary documents and anecdotes, The Roman Empire in Late Antiquity is designed for use in undergraduate courses on late antiquity and early medieval history.
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Rome, China, Iran, and the Steppe, ca. 250–750

Author: Nicola Di Cosmo,Michael Maas

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1108547001

Category: History

Page: N.A

View: 6348

Empires and Exchanges in Eurasian Late Antiquity offers an integrated picture of Rome, China, Iran, and the Steppes during a formative period of world history. In the half millennium between 250 and 750 CE, settled empires underwent deep structural changes, while various nomadic peoples of the steppes (Huns, Avars, Turks, and others) experienced significant interactions and movements that changed their societies, cultures, and economies. This was a transformational era, a time when Roman, Persian, and Chinese monarchs were mutually aware of court practices, and when Christians and Buddhists criss-crossed the Eurasian lands together with merchants and armies. It was a time of greater circulation of ideas as well as material goods. This volume provides a conceptual frame for locating these developments in the same space and time. Without arguing for uniformity, it illuminates the interconnections and networks that tied countless local cultural expressions to far-reaching inter-regional ones.
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Author: Julia Hillner

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1316297896

Category: History

Page: N.A

View: 9258

This book traces the long-term genesis of the sixth-century Roman legal penalty of forced monastic penance. The late antique evidence on this penal institution runs counter to a scholarly consensus that Roman legal principle did not acknowledge the use of corrective punitive confinement. Dr Hillner argues that forced monastic penance was a product of a late Roman penal landscape that was more complex than previous models of Roman punishment have allowed. She focuses on invigoration of classical normative discourses around punishment as education through Christian concepts of penance, on social uses of corrective confinement that can be found in a vast range of public and private scenarios and spaces, as well as on a literary Christian tradition that gave the experience of punitive imprisonment a new meaning. The book makes an important contribution to recent debates about the interplay between penal strategies and penal practices in the late Roman world.
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Studies in Text Transmission

Author: Dirk Rohmann

Publisher: Walter de Gruyter GmbH & Co KG

ISBN: 3110485559

Category: Religion

Page: 369

View: 1827

The role of Christian institutions, writers and saints in the active suppression and destruction of books in Late Antiquity has received surprisingly little consideration. The author argues that texts and ideas from materialistic philosophical traditions were vulnerable to destruction, censorship or suppression through prohibition of the copying of manuscripts. This includes texts which were to become the basis for modern philosophy and science.
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Studies in the Imperial Law of Late Antiquity

Author: Wood,Jill Harries

Publisher: Bristol Classical Press

ISBN: 9781853997402

Category: History

Page: 268

View: 6534

The Theodosian Code, put together under the Eastern Roman Emperor Theodosius II, is a compliation of the laws dating from 312 to 438 AD, when the code was published. It brought order to a vast unmanageable body of law and formed part of the basis for the sixth-century Institutes of Justinian, fundamental to later jurisprudence. This book is an important collection of articles, well established as an essential resource for students of Roman law, long unavailable and here published in paperback for the first time with a new preface and updated bibliography. Contributors: Simon Corcoran; Brian Croke; Judith Evans Grubbs; Jill Harries; Tony Honore; David Hunt; John Matthews; Boudewijn Sirks; Mark Vessey; Dafydd Walters; Ian Wood.
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Author: Ole-Albert Rønning,Helle Møller Sigh,Helle Vogt

Publisher: Taylor & Francis

ISBN: 135172598X

Category: History

Page: 332

View: 8397

Donations, Inheritance and Property in the Nordic and Western World from Late Antiquity until Today presents an examination of Nordic donation and gift-giving practices in the Nordic and Western world, beginning in late Antiquity and extending through to the present day. Through chapters contributed by leading international researchers, this book explores the changing legal, social and religious frameworks that shape how donations and gifts are given. In addition to donations to ecclesiastical, charitable and cultural institutions, this books also highlights the sociolegal challenges and the tensions that can occur as a result of transferring property, including answering key questions such as who has a right to what. It also presents, for the first time, an insight into the dynamics of donations and the interplay between individual motivations, strategic behaviour and the legal setting of inheritance law. Offering a broad chronological and European perspective and including a wide range of illuminating case studies Donations, Inheritance and Property in the Nordic and Western World from Late Antiquity until Today is ideal for students of Nordic and European legal and social history.
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Author: Christopher KELLY,Christopher Kelly

Publisher: Harvard University Press

ISBN: 0674039459

Category: History

Page: 352

View: 4564

In this highly original work, Christopher Kelly paints a remarkable picture of running a superstate. He portrays a complex system of government openly regulated by networks of personal influence and the payment of money. Focusing on the Roman Empire after Constantine's conversion to Christianity, Kelly illuminates a period of increasingly centralized rule through an ever more extensive and intrusive bureaucracy. The book opens with a view of its times through the eyes of a high-ranking official in sixth-century Constantinople, John Lydus. His On the Magistracies of the Roman State, the only memoir of its kind to come down to us, gives an impassioned and revealing account of his career and the system in which he worked. Kelly draws a wealth of insight from this singular memoir and goes on to trace the operation of power and influence, exposing how these might be successfully deployed or skillfully diverted by those wishing either to avoid government regulation or to subvert it for their own ends. Ruling the Later Roman Empire presents a fascinating procession of officials, emperors, and local power brokers, winners and losers, mapping their experiences, their conflicting loyalties, their successes, and their failures. This important book elegantly recaptures the experience of both rulers and ruled under a sophisticated and highly successful system of government.
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From Late Antiquity to the Twentieth Century

Author: Peter Crooks,Timothy H. Parsons

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 131672106X

Category: History

Page: N.A

View: 4153

How did empires rule different peoples across vast expanses of space and time? And how did small numbers of imperial bureaucrats govern large numbers of subordinated peoples? Empires and Bureaucracy in World History seeks answers to these fundamental problems in imperial studies by exploring the power and limits of bureaucracy. The book is pioneering in bringing together historians of antiquity and the Middle Ages with scholars of post-medieval European empires, while a genuinely world-historical perspective is provided by chapters on China, the Incas and the Ottomans. The editors identify a paradox in how bureaucracy operated on the scale of empires and so help explain why some empires endured for centuries while, in the contemporary world, empires fail almost before they begin. By adopting a cross-chronological and world-historical approach, the book challenges the abiding association of bureaucratic rationality with 'modernity' and the so-called 'Rise of the West'.
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