Author: Clifford Ando

Publisher: University of Pennsylvania Press

ISBN: 0812204883

Category: History

Page: 184

View: 8249

The Romans depicted the civil law as a body of rules crafted through communal deliberation for the purpose of self-government. Yet, as Clifford Ando demonstrates in Law, Language, and Empire in the Roman Tradition, the civil law was also an instrument of empire: many of its most characteristic features developed in response to the challenges posed when the legal system of Rome was deployed to embrace, incorporate, and govern people and cultures far afield. Ando studies the processes through which lawyers at Rome grappled with the legal pluralism resulting from imperial conquests. He focuses primarily on the tools—most prominently analogy and fiction—used to extend the system and enable it to regulate the lives of persons far from the minds of the original legislators, and he traces the central place that philosophy of language came to occupy in Roman legal thought. In the second part of the book Ando examines the relationship between civil, public, and international law. Despite the prominence accorded public and international law in legal theory, it was civil law that provided conceptual resources to those other fields in the Roman tradition. Ultimately it was the civil law's implication in systems of domination outside its own narrow sphere that opened the door to its own subversion. When political turmoil at Rome upended the institutions of political and legislative authority and effectively ended Roman democracy, the concepts and language that the civil law supplied to the project of Republican empire saw their meanings transformed. As a result, forms of domination once exercised by Romans over others were inscribed in the workings of law at Rome, henceforth to be exercised by the Romans over themselves.
Read More

Reflections on Civic Religion in Rome

Author: John Scheid

Publisher: University of Pennsylvania Press

ISBN: 0812291980

Category: History

Page: 200

View: 6505

Roman religion has long presented a number of challenges to historians approaching the subject from a perspective framed by the three Abrahamic religions. The Romans had no sacred text that espoused its creed or offered a portrait of its foundational myth. They described relations with the divine using technical terms widely employed to describe relations with other humans. Indeed, there was not even a word in classical Latin that corresponds to the English word religion. In The Gods, the State, and the Individual, John Scheid confronts these and other challenges directly. If Roman religious practice has long been dismissed as a cynical or naïve system of borrowed structures unmarked by any true piety, Scheid contends that this is the result of a misplaced expectation that the basis of religion lies in an individual's personal and revelatory relationship with his or her god. He argues that when viewed in the light of secular history as opposed to Christian theology, Roman religion emerges as a legitimate phenomenon in which rituals, both public and private, enforced a sense of communal, civic, and state identity. Since the 1970s, Scheid has been one of the most influential figures reshaping scholarly understanding of ancient Roman religion. The Gods, the State, and the Individual presents a translation of Scheid's work that chronicles the development of his field-changing scholarship.
Read More

Author: Valentina Arena

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1139620169

Category: History

Page: N.A

View: 8043

This is a comprehensive analysis of the idea of libertas and its conflicting uses in the political struggles of the late Roman Republic. By reconstructing Roman political thinking about liberty against the background of Classical and Hellenistic thought, it excavates two distinct intellectual traditions on the means allowing for the preservation and the loss of libertas. Considering the interplay of these traditions in the political debates of the first century BC, Dr Arena offers a significant reinterpretation of the political struggles of the time as well as a radical reappraisal of the role played by the idea of liberty in the practice of politics. She argues that, as a result of its uses in rhetorical debates, libertas underwent a form of conceptual change at the end of the Republic and came to legitimise a new course of politics, which led progressively to the transformation of the whole political system.
Read More

A New Appraisal

Author: Richard Jenkyns,Reader in Classical Languages and Literature Fellow Richard Jenkyns

Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA

ISBN: 9780198219170

Category: Drama

Page: 479

View: 9942

The achievements of the Roman world have profoundly affected European and world civilization. The original Legacy of Rome, edited by Cyril Bailey, was published in 1923 and has been widely read and enjoyed. Nearly seventy years on, this new edition, illustrated with 24 pages of plates, offersan entirely fresh assessment of the influence of ancient Rome on the literature, art, culture, thought, and governance of later times. Fourteen contributors from a variety of disciplines each bring their individual knowledge and experience to the subjects discussed. Classical scholars consider the influence of Virgil, Horace, Ovid, pastoral, satire, and rhetoric. Historians assess Rome's impact through the ages, and textualtransmission. Art, architecture, law, drama, and language are also individually discussed. The varied approach and content of this new appraisal bear witness to the richness of the civilization which forms such a large part of our heritage today.
Read More

Religion and the Roman Empire

Author: Clifford Ando

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN: 9780520933651

Category: History

Page: 270

View: 6759

What did the Romans know about their gods? Why did they perform the rituals of their religion, and what motivated them to change those rituals? To these questions Clifford Ando proposes simple answers: In contrast to ancient Christians, who had faith, Romans had knowledge, and their knowledge was empirical in orientation. In other words, the Romans acquired knowledge of the gods through observation of the world, and their rituals were maintained or modified in light of what they learned. After a preface and opening chapters that lay out this argument about knowledge and place it in context, The Matter of the Gods pursues a variety of themes essential to the study of religion in history.
Read More

General Analysis and Three Case Studies on Law of Succession, Guardianship and Marriage

Author: Jacobine G. Oudshoorn

Publisher: BRILL

ISBN: 9004149740

Category: Religion

Page: 456

View: 6103

Using a division between substantive and formal law as the key element for understanding the applicable law in papyri, this study offers a new understanding of the distinct parts Roman and local law played in the legal reality of second-century Arabia.
Read More

Tabulae in Roman Belief and Practice

Author: Elizabeth A. Meyer

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9781139449113

Category: History

Page: N.A

View: 6916

Greeks wrote mostly on papyrus, but the Romans wrote solemn religious, public and legal documents on wooden tablets often coated with wax. This book investigates the historical significance of this resonant form of writing; its power to order the human realm and cosmos and to make documents efficacious; its role in court; the uneven spread - an aspect of Romanization - of this Roman form outside Italy, as provincials made different guesses as to what would please their Roman overlords; and its influence on the evolution of Roman law. An historical epoch of Roman legal transactions without writing is revealed as a juristic myth of origins. Roman legal documents on tablets are the ancestors of today's dispositive legal documents - the document as the act itself. In a world where knowledge of the Roman law was scarce - and enforcers scarcer - the Roman law drew its authority from a wider world of belief.
Read More

Author: Holly Mikkelson

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1317640861

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 118

View: 2536

Court interpreting is becoming increasingly professionalized as the number of practitioners grows and judicial systems and legislatures throughout the world focus more on language rights as an element of due process. Introduction to Court Interpreting is the first course book for court interpreter training that is not oriented toward the judicial system of a particular country, but can be used in any country for training interpreters in any language combination. It covers the history of the profession, the legal basis for the interpreter's presence in the courtroom, criminal and civil procedure, comparative law, the role of the interpreter in the judiciary setting, ethical principles, techniques of interpreting, and resources for continuing education and research. Designed to be accessible to both teachers and students, it contains numerous practical exercises and suggestions for further reading, as well as a comprehensive bibliography. Many changes have taken place in the court interpreting profession and in the judicial systems of many countries in recent years. Introduction to Court Interpreting reflects these developments and addresses the need for an up-to-date, globalized approach to preparing an increasingly diverse student population to enter this challenging profession.
Read More

A Sourcebook on Marriage, Divorce and Widowhood

Author: Judith Evans Grubbs

Publisher: Psychology Press

ISBN: 9780415152402

Category: History

Page: 349

View: 5407

It is widely recognized that Roman law is an important source of information about women in the Roman world, and can present a more rounded and accurate picture than literary sources. This sourcebook fully exploits the rich legal material of the imperial period - from Augustus (31 BCE - 14 CE) to the end of the western Roman Empire (476 CE), incorporating both pagan and Christian eras, and explaining the rights women held under Roman law, the restrictions to which they were subject, and legal regulations on marriage, divorce and widowhood. The main focus is on the major legal texts (the Digest, the Institutes of Gaius, the Code of Justinian and the Theodosian Code), but a significant number of non-legal documentary sources are included. These are particularly important as they illustrate how the law worked in practice, and how this practice (particularly in the provinces) could differ from the letter of the law. Accessible English translations are enhanced by clear, concise background material, which includes useful explanation of historical and geographical context, and a helpful glossary of Roman legal and administrative terms completes the volume.
Read More

Fear, Favour and Prejudice

Author: Martin Chanock

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9780521791564

Category: History

Page: 571

View: 467

Martin Chanock's definitive perspective on the development of South Africa's legal system in the early twentieth century examines all areas of the law: criminal law and criminology; the Roman-Dutch law; the State's African law; Land, Labour and 'Rule of Law' questions. His revisionist analysis of the South African legal culture illustrates the larger processes of legal colonization, while the consideration of the interaction between imported doctrine and legislative models with local contexts and approaches also provides a basis for understanding the re-fashioning of law under circumstances of post-colonialism and globalization.
Read More

Author: Simon Hornblower,Antony Spawforth,Esther Eidinow

Publisher: OUP Oxford

ISBN: 0191016764

Category: History

Page: 912

View: 5946

What did the ancient Greeks eat and drink? What role did migration play? Why was emperor Nero popular with the ordinary people but less so with the upper classes? Why (according to ancient authors) was Oedipus ('with swollen foot') so called? For over 2,000 years the civilizations of ancient Greece and Rome have captivated our collective imagination and provided inspiration for so many aspects of our lives, from culture, literature, drama, cinema, and television to society, education, and politics. Many of the roots of the way life is lived in the West today can be traced to the ancient civilizations, not only in politics, law, technology, philosophy, and science, but also in social and family life, language, and art. Beautiful illustrations, clear and authoritative entries, and a useful chronology and bibliography make this Companion the perfect guide for readers interested in learning more about the Graeco-Roman world. As well as providing sound information on all aspects of classical civilization such as history, politics, ethics, morals, law, society, religion, mythology, science and technology, language, literature, art, and scholarship, the entries in the Companion reflect the changing interdisciplinary aspects of classical studies, covering broad thematic subjects, such as race, nationalism, gender, ethics, and ecology, confirming the impact classical civilizations have had on the modern world.
Read More

Author: Jill Harries

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9780521422734

Category: History

Page: 246

View: 9964

The first systematic historical treatment in English of public law in the later Roman Empire.
Read More

Author: Ulrich Ammon

Publisher: Walter de Gruyter

ISBN: 3110199874

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 891

View: 1009

The series Handbooks of Linguistics and Communication Science is designed to illuminate a field which not only includes general linguistics and the study of linguistics as applied to specific languages, but also covers those more recent areas which have developed from the increasing body of research into the manifold forms of communicative action and interaction.
Read More

Author: Beryl Rawson

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN: 9781444390759

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 664

View: 1389

A Companion to Families in the Greek and Roman Worlds draws from both established and current scholarship to offer a broad overview of the field, engage in contemporary debates, and pose stimulating questions about future development in the study of families. Provides up-to-date research on family structure from archaeology, art, social, cultural, and economic history Includes contributions from established and rising international scholars Features illustrations of families, children, slaves, and ritual life, along with maps and diagrams of sites and dwellings Honorable Mention for 2011 Single Volume Reference/Humanities & Social Sciences PROSE award granted by the Association of American Publishers
Read More

A Resource Book for Students

Author: Paul Simpson,Andrea Mayr

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1135282188

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 256

View: 2110

Routledge English Language Introductions cover core areas of language study and are one-stop resources for students. Assuming no prior knowledge, books in the series offer an accessible overview of the subject, with activities, study questions, sample analyses, commentaries and key readings – all in the same volume. The innovative and flexible ‘two-dimensional’ structure is built around four sections – introduction, development, exploration and extension – which offer self-contained stages for study. Each topic can also be read across these sections, enabling the reader to build gradually on the knowledge gained. Language and Power: offers a comprehensive survey of the ways in which language intersects and connects with the social, cultural and political aspects of power, provides a comprehensive introduction to the history of the field, and covers all the major approaches, theoretical concepts and methods of analysis in this important and developing area of academic study; covers all the ‘traditional’ topics, such as race, gender and institutional power, but also incorporates newer material from forensic discourse analysis, the discourse of new capitalism and the study of humour as power; includes readings from works by seminal figures in the field, such as Roger Fowler, Deborah Cameron and Teun van Dijk; uses real texts and examples throughout, including advertisements from cosmetics companies; newspaper articles and headlines; websites and internet media; and spoken dialogues such as a transcription from the Obama and McCain presidential debate; is accompanied by a supporting website that aims to challenge students at a more advanced level and features a complete four-unit chapter which includes activities, a reading and suggestions for further work. Language and Power will be essential reading for students studying English language and linguistics. Paul Simpson is Professor of English Language in the School of English at Queen’s University Belfast, UK, where he teaches and researches in stylistics, critical linguistics and related fields of study. Andrea Mayr is Lecturer in Modern English Language and Linguistics at Queen’s University Belfast, UK, where she teaches and researches in media discourse and in multimodal critical discourse analysis.
Read More

Author: Mark E. Amsler

Publisher: John Benjamins Publishing

ISBN: 9027286035

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 280

View: 6875

This study focuses on the uses of the grammatical concept of etymologia in primarily Latin writings from the early Middle Ages. Etymologia is a fundamental procedure and discursive strategy in the philosophy and analysis of language in early medieval Latin grammar, as well as in Biblical exegesis, encyclopedic writing, theology, and philosophy. Read through the frame of poststructuralist analysis of discourse and the philosophy of science, the procedure of the ars grammatica are interpreted as overlapping genres (commentary, glossary, encyclopedia, exegesis) which use different verbal or extraverbal criteria to explain the origins and significations of words and which establish different epistemological frames within which an etymological account of language is situated. The study also includes many translations of heretofore untranslated passages from Latin grammatical and exegetical writings.
Read More

Author: Michael Burgan

Publisher: Infobase Publishing

ISBN: 1438103123

Category: Rome

Page: 129

View: 1016

The influence of the Roman Empire has been widespread and profound, perhaps more so than any other empire or civilization. This volume covers the growth of Rome as a republic, the political and social forces that drove the transition to a dictatorship of Caesars, the reasons for Rome's decline, and what happened to the remnants of the empire.
Read More

Author: Thomas A. J. McGinn

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780199882946

Category: History

Page: 436

View: 7312

This is a study of the legal rules affecting the practice of female prostitution at Rome approximately from 200 B.C. to A.D. 250. It examines the formation and precise content of the legal norms developed for prostitution and those engaged in this profession, with close attention to their social context. McGinn's unique study explores the "fit" between the law-system and the socio-economic reality while shedding light on important questions concerning marginal groups, marriage, sexual behavior, the family, slavery, and citizen status, particularly that of women.
Read More

Unity and Diversity Over Two Millennia

Author: R. C. van Caenegem

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9780521006484

Category: History

Page: 175

View: 5418

R. C. van Caenegem considers the historical reasons behind European legal diversity.
Read More

Author: Marcia L. Colish

Publisher: Yale University Press

ISBN: 9780300078527

Category: History

Page: 388

View: 8813

This magisterial book is an analysis of the course of Western intellectual history between A.D. 400 and 1400. The book is arranged in two parts: the first surveys the comparative modes of thought and varying success of Byzantine, Latin-Christian, and Muslim cultures, and the second takes the reader from the eleventh-century revival of learning to the high Middle Ages and beyond, the period in which the vibrancy of Western intellectual culture enabled it to stamp its imprint well beyond the frontiers of Christendom. Marcia Colish argues that the foundations of the Western intellectual tradition were laid in the Middle Ages and not, as is commonly held, in the Judeo-Christian or classical periods. She contends that Western medieval thinkers produced a set of tolerances, tastes, concerns, and sensibilities that made the Middle Ages unlike other chapters of the Western intellectual experience. She provides astute descriptions of the vernacular and oral culture of each country of Europe; explores the nature of medieval culture and its transmission; profiles seminal thinkers (Augustine, Anselm, Gregory the Great, Aquinas, Ockham); studies heresy from Manichaeism to Huss and Wycliffe; and investigates the influence of Arab and Jewish writing on scholasticism and the resurrection of Greek studies. Colish concludes with an assessment of the modes of medieval thought that ended with the period and those that remained as bases for later ages of European intellectual history.
Read More