Author: Ronald Dworkin

Publisher: Harvard University Press

ISBN: 9780674518360

Category: History

Page: 470

View: 1360

A renowned legal scholar presents a theory of law based on Anglo-American legal principles and practices, juridical interpretations, legal precedence, and a forcefully argued concept of political and legal integrity
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The Jurisprudence of Ronald Dworkin

Author: Scott Hershovitz

Publisher: OUP Oxford

ISBN: 0191021652

Category: Law

Page: 352

View: 2054

Exploring Law's Empire is a collection of essays examining the work of Ronald Dworkin in the philosophy of law and constitutionalism. A group of leading legal theorists develop, defend and critique the major areas of Dworkin's work, including his criticism of legal positivism, his theory of law as integrity, and his work on constitutional theory. The volume concludes with a lengthy response to the essays by Dworkin himself, which develops and clarifies many of his positions on the central questions of legal and constitutional theory. The volume represents an ideal companion for students and scholars embarking on a study of Dworkin's work.
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Author: Ronald Dworkin

Publisher: Suhrkamp Verlag

ISBN: 3518737325

Category: Philosophy

Page: 146

View: 3663

Das Zentrum wahrer Religiosität, so der bekennende Atheist Albert Einstein, sei die Ehrfurcht vor den Mysterien des Universums, »deren höchste Weisheit und strahlende Schönheit wir mit unseren matten Erkenntnisvermögen nur rudimentär begreifen können«. In diesem Sinne sei er, Einstein, ein tiefreligiöser Mensch. Aber was ist religiös an einer solchen Haltung, in der Gott offensichtlich keine Rolle spielt? Mit dieser Frage beschäftigte sich Ronald Dworkin in seinen Einstein-Vorlesungen, die er bis kurz vor seinem Tod zu diesem Buch ausgearbeitet hat. Religion, so seine Antwort, bezeichnet eine Sicht auf die Welt, die von einem tiefen Glauben an objektive Werte getragen wird – etwa daran, dass Geschöpfe eine Würde haben, dass ein Leben erfüllt oder verfehlt sein kann oder dass Schönheit, die uns den Atem raubt, sich nicht als pures Produkt unserer Sinnesorgane erklären lässt. Auch Theisten teilen diese Werte, meinen aber, sie seien gottgegeben. Für Dworkin verhält es sich genau umgekehrt: Die Idee eines Gottes rührt daher, dass es diese Werte wirklich gibt. Und an Gott (oder Götter) zu glauben ist eine Weise, dies auszudrücken, aber nicht die einzige. Von der Physik über die Politik bis hin zum Recht erkundet »Religion ohne Gott« den Perspektivwechsel, der mit einem solchen gottlosen Verständnis von Religion verbunden ist. Das Buch, das mit einer eindrucksvollen Reflexion über Tod und Unsterblichkeit schließt, ist das Vermächtnis eines bekennenden religiösen Atheisten. Es weitet den Blick für das, was wichtig ist.
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Author: J. Angelo Corlett

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN: 1402096526

Category: Philosophy

Page: 228

View: 2176

Race, Rights, and Justice explores questions of the nature of law and constitutional interpretation, international law and global justice, and the nature, function, and importance of rights each from a perspective that takes seriously the realities of race and racism. After a critical assessment of various contemporary theories of law is provided, a new theory of legal interpretation is set forth and defended. The respective words of Immanuel Kant and H.L.A. Hart on the possibility and desirability of international law are carefully explicated. Following this, Race, Rights, and Justice defends John Rawls' Law of Peoples from the cosmopolitan liberal critique of it. The nature and importance of rights, both individual and collective, are clarified while correcting some political philosophies that have propagated confused rhetoric about rights. And the collective right to humanitarian intervention is investigated philosophically in terms of the recent problems in Colombia, with surprisingly original results. While the methodology of this book is thoroughly analytical, philosophically speaking, some of the conclusions drawn are substantially original, infusing the facts of race and racism into mainstream matters of philosophy of law. "In this collection of essays, J. Angelo Corlett continues his important work of bringing the perspective of indigenous peoples, and more generally of race, into mainstream philosophical debates about justice and rights. Corlett's book also has very valuable insights into the nature of international law that will greatly enrich our contemporary debates." (Larry May, Washington University in St. Louis, USA) "Angelo Corlett is a prolific writer whose work is invariably stimulating, provocative, and insightful. Race, Rights, and Justice is an important addition to the oeuvre. Corlett is not afraid to tackle big problems, and big names. See, for example, his scathing criticisms of Bork and Scalia on constitutional interpretation." (Burleigh T. Wilkins, University of California, Santa Barbara, USA)
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From Law's Empire to the Administrative State

Author: Adrian Vermeule

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9780674974739

Category: LAW

Page: 254

View: 7235

"Ronald Dworkin once imagined law as an empire and judges as its princes. But over time, the arc of law has bent steadily toward deference to the administrative state. Adrian Vermeule argues that law has freely abandoned its imperial pretensions, and has done so for internal legal reasons. In area after area, judges and lawyers, working out the logical implications of legal principles, have come to believe that administrators should be granted broad leeway to set policy, determine facts, interpret ambiguous statutes, and even define the boundaries of their own jurisdiction. Agencies have greater democratic legitimacy and technical competence to confront many issues than lawyers and judges do. And as the questions confronting the state involving climate change, terrorism, and biotechnology (to name a few) have become ever more complex, legal logic increasingly indicates that abnegation is the wisest course of action"--
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Ideas, Practices, Actors

Author: N.A

Publisher: BRILL

ISBN: 9004249516

Category: Political Science

Page: 360

View: 599

Law and Empire relates the principles of legal thinking in Chinese, Islamic, and European contexts to practices of lawmaking and adjudication. It shows how legal procedure and legal thinking could be used in strikingly different ways.
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The Reach of Empire

Author: Senior Lecturer School of History Diane Kirkby,Diane Elizabeth Kirkby,Catharine Coleborne,Professor of History in the School of Social Sciences Catharine Coleborne

Publisher: Manchester University Press

ISBN: 9780719060663

Category: History

Page: 307

View: 8130

This work brings together the disciplines of law, history and post-colonial studies in an exploration of imperialism. In essays, from a range of disciplinary backgrounds, it offers perspectives on the length and breadth of empire.
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Author: Elke Cloots

Publisher: OUP Oxford

ISBN: 0191053503

Category: Law

Page: 414

View: 5831

Despite nearly sixty years of European integration, neither nations nor national loyalties have withered away. On the contrary, national identity rhetoric seems on the rise, not only in politics but also in legal discourse. Lately we have seen a rise in the number of Member States invoking their national identity in an attempt to justify a derogation from a requirement imposed on them by a Treaty article or an EU legislative act, or to legitimize a particular national reading of such an EU norm. Despite this, the European Court of Justice (ECJ) has yet to develop a coherent approach to such arguments, or express a vision of the role national identity should play in EU law. Elke Cloots undertakes this task by providing a principled and coherent scheme for the adjudication of disputes involving claims based on the national identity of a Member State. Should arguments involving national identity be legally relevant? If yes, how should the ECJ approach such identity-related interests? Cloots crafts a normative framework to assist the ECJ in striking the right balance between European integration and respect for the identity concerns at issue. The book combines rigorous theoretical inquiry with thorough analysis of the European Treaties and case law, with particular attention paid to litigation involving domestic measures concerning the national system of government, constitutional rights protections, and language policy. Clarifying the issues at stake and presenting a solution to these problems, this book will be an invaluable resource for the academics, lawyers, and policy makers in the field.
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Author: International Association for Philosophy of Law and Social Philosophy. World Congress,Arend Soeteman

Publisher: Franz Steiner Verlag

ISBN: 9783515066792

Category: Social Science

Page: 196

View: 5905

Proceedings of the 16th World Congress of the International Association for Philosophy of Law and Social Philosophy (IVR), Reykjavík, 26 May-2 June, 1993.
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Author: Clifford Ando

Publisher: University of Pennsylvania Press

ISBN: 0812204883

Category: History

Page: 184

View: 2092

The Romans depicted the civil law as a body of rules crafted through communal deliberation for the purpose of self-government. Yet, as Clifford Ando demonstrates in Law, Language, and Empire in the Roman Tradition, the civil law was also an instrument of empire: many of its most characteristic features developed in response to the challenges posed when the legal system of Rome was deployed to embrace, incorporate, and govern people and cultures far afield. Ando studies the processes through which lawyers at Rome grappled with the legal pluralism resulting from imperial conquests. He focuses primarily on the tools—most prominently analogy and fiction—used to extend the system and enable it to regulate the lives of persons far from the minds of the original legislators, and he traces the central place that philosophy of language came to occupy in Roman legal thought. In the second part of the book Ando examines the relationship between civil, public, and international law. Despite the prominence accorded public and international law in legal theory, it was civil law that provided conceptual resources to those other fields in the Roman tradition. Ultimately it was the civil law's implication in systems of domination outside its own narrow sphere that opened the door to its own subversion. When political turmoil at Rome upended the institutions of political and legislative authority and effectively ended Roman democracy, the concepts and language that the civil law supplied to the project of Republican empire saw their meanings transformed. As a result, forms of domination once exercised by Romans over others were inscribed in the workings of law at Rome, henceforth to be exercised by the Romans over themselves.
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Author: Paul J du Plessis

Publisher: Edinburgh University Press

ISBN: 0748668195

Category: Law

Page: 256

View: 9089

An interdisciplinary, edited collection on social science methodologies for approaching Roman legal sources. Roman law as a field of study is rapidly evolving to reflect new perspectives and approaches in research. Scholars who work on the subject are i
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Historical Explorations

Author: Martti Koskenniemi,Postdoctoral Researcher Walter Rech,Manuel Jimenez Fonseca

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0198795572

Category:

Page: 416

View: 2872

In times in which global governance in its various forms, such as human rights, international trade law, and development projects, is increasingly promoted by transnational economic actors and international institutions that seem to be detached from democratic processes of legitimation, the question of the relationship between international law and empire is as topical as ever. By examining this relationship in historical contexts from early modernity to the present, this volume aims to deepen current understandings of the way international legal institutions, practices, and narratives have shaped specifically imperial ideas about and structures of world governance. As it explores fundamental ways in which international legal discourses have operated in colonial as well as European contexts, the book enters a heated debate on the involvement of the modern law of nations in imperial projects. Each of the chapters contributes to this emerging body of scholarship by drawing out the complexity and ambivalence of the relationship between international law and empire. They expand on the critique of western imperialism while acknowledging the nuances and ambiguities of international legal discourse and, in some cases, the possibility of counter-hegemonic claims being articulated through the language of international law. Importantly, as the book suggests that international legal argument may sometimes be used to counter imperial enterprises, it maintains that international law can barely escape the Eurocentric framework within which the progressive aspirations of internationalism were conceived
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Imagined Constitutions, Remembered Legalities

Author: Ian Duncanson

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1136626816

Category: History

Page: 272

View: 8380

Historiography, Empire and the Rule of Law considers the intersection of these terms in the historical development of what has come to be known as the ‘rule of law’. The separation of governmental powers, checks and balances, and judicial independence signified something entirely new in the way in which politics was imagined and practiced. This ‘rule of law’ cannot, as it often is, be traced to the justification and practice of government as originating in a social contract among the governed; but rather, by analogy with a popular conveyancing innovation of the era, to the trust – a device by which the power of ownership of land could be restrained. But how could the restraint of power remain consistent with the avoidance of anarchic disagreement among those granted the task of supervision and restraint? In response, it is argued here, the central legal and political task became one of managing disagreement and change peacefully and constructively – by drawing on a colonial tradition that emphasised civility, negotiation and compromise. And the study of all of these qualities as they evolved, Ian Duncanson contends, is vital to understanding the emergence of the ‘rule of law’. Historiography, Empire and the Rule of Law will be invaluable for all those engaged in research and the postgraduate study of socio-legal and constitutional studies, and early modern and modern history.
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Essays in Epistemology, Hermeneutics and Jurisprudence

Author: P.J. Nerhot

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN: 9401578753

Category: Philosophy

Page: 458

View: 334

PATRICKNERHOT Since the two operations overlap each other so much, speaking about fact and interpretation in legal science separately would undoubtedly be highly artificial. To speak about fact in law already brings in the operation we call interpretation. EquaHy, to speak about interpretation is to deal with the method of identifying reality and therefore, in large part, to enter the area of the question of fact. By way of example, Bemard Jackson's text, which we have placed in section 11 of the first part of this volume, could no doubt just as weH have found a horne in section I. This work is aimed at analyzing this interpretation of the operation of identifying fact on the one hand and identifying the meaning of a text on the other. All philosophies of law recognize themselves in the analysis they propose for this interpretation, and we too shall seek in this volume to fumish a few elements of use for this analysis. We wish however to make it clear that our endeavour is addressed not only to legal philosophers: the nature of the interpretive act in legal science is a matter of interest to the legal practitioner too. He will find in these pages, we believe, elements that will serve hirn in rcflcction on his daily work.
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Crimes, Contracts, and Torts

Author: Ugo Pagallo

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN: 9400765649

Category: Law

Page: 200

View: 4219

This book explores how the design, construction, and use of robotics technology may affect today’s legal systems and, more particularly, matters of responsibility and agency in criminal law, contractual obligations, and torts. By distinguishing between the behaviour of robots as tools of human interaction, and robots as proper agents in the legal arena, jurists will have to address a new generation of “hard cases.” General disagreement may concern immunity in criminal law (e.g., the employment of robot soldiers in battle), personal accountability for certain robots in contracts (e.g., robo-traders), much as clauses of strict liability and negligence-based responsibility in extra-contractual obligations (e.g., service robots in tort law). Since robots are here to stay, the aim of the law should be to wisely govern our mutual relationships.
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Legality in a Time of Emergency

Author: David Dyzenhaus

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1139460501

Category: Law

Page: N.A

View: 671

Dyzenhaus deals with the urgent question of how governments should respond to emergencies and terrorism by exploring the idea that there is an unwritten constitution of law, exemplified in the common law constitution of Commonwealth countries. He looks mainly to cases decided in the United Kingdom, Australia and Canada to demonstrate that even in the absence of an entrenched bill of rights, the law provides a moral resource that can inform a rule-of-law project capable of responding to situations which place legal and political order under great stress. Those cases are discussed against a backdrop of recent writing and judicial decisions in the United States of America in order to show that the issues are not confined to the Commonwealth. The author argues that the rule-of-law project is one in which judges play an important role, but which also requires the participation of the legislature and the executive.
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From Islamic Empires to the Taliban

Author: Shemeem Burney Abbas

Publisher: University of Texas Press

ISBN: 0292753071

Category: Law

Page: 222

View: 9026

Under the guise of Islamic law, the prophet Muhammad's Islam, and the Qur'an, states such as Pakistan, Afghanistan, Egypt, Saudi Arabia, and Bangladesh are using blasphemy laws to suppress freedom of speech. Yet the Prophet never tried or executed anyone for blasphemy, nor does the Qur'an authorize the practice. Asserting that blasphemy laws are neither Islamic nor Qur'anic, Shemeem Burney Abbas traces the evolution of these laws from the Islamic empires that followed the death of the Prophet Muhammad to the present-day Taliban. Her pathfinding study on the shari'a and gender demonstrates that Pakistan's blasphemy laws are the inventions of a military state that manipulates discourse in the name of Islam to exclude minorities, women, free thinkers, and even children from the rights of citizenship. Abbas herself was persecuted under Pakistan's blasphemy laws, so she writes from both personal experience and years of scholarly study. Her analysis exposes the questionable motives behind Pakistan's blasphemy laws, which were resurrected during General Zia-ul-Haq's regime of 1977–1988—motives that encompassed gaining geopolitical control of the region, including Afghanistan, in order to weaken the Soviet Union. Abbas argues that these laws created a state-sponsored "infidel" ideology that now affects global security as militant groups such as the Taliban justify violence against all "infidels" who do not subscribe to their interpretation of Islam. She builds a strong case for the suspension of Pakistan's blasphemy laws and for a return to the Prophet's peaceful vision of social justice.
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