The Rehnquist Court, Indian Rights, And the Legal History of Racism in America

Author: Robert A. Williams

Publisher: U of Minnesota Press

ISBN: 1452907560

Category: Law

Page: 270

View: 4796

Robert A. Williams Jr. boldly exposes the ongoing legal force of the racist language directed at Indians in American society. Fueled by well-known negative racial stereotypes of Indian savagery and cultural inferiority, this language, Williams contends, has functioned “like a loaded weapon” in the Supreme Court’s Indian law decisions. Beginning with Chief Justice John Marshall’s foundational opinions in the early nineteenth century and continuing today in the judgments of the Rehnquist Court, Williams shows how undeniably racist language and precedent are still used in Indian law to justify the denial of important rights of property, self-government, and cultural survival to Indians. Building on the insights of Malcolm X, Thurgood Marshall, and Frantz Fanon, Williams argues that racist language has been employed by the courts to legalize a uniquely American form of racial dictatorship over Indian tribes by the U.S. government. Williams concludes with a revolutionary proposal for reimagining the rights of American Indians in international law, as well as strategies for compelling the current Supreme Court to confront the racist origins of Indian law and for challenging bigoted ways of talking, thinking, and writing about American Indians. Robert A. Williams Jr. is professor of law and American Indian studies at the James E. Rogers College of Law, University of Arizona. A member of the Lumbee Indian Tribe, he is author of The American Indian in Western Legal Thought: The Discourses of Conquest and coauthor of Federal Indian Law.
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Understanding the World through Stories

Author: Jill Doerfler,Niigaanwewidam James Sinclair,Heidi Kiiwetinepinesiik Stark

Publisher: MSU Press

ISBN: 1609173538

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 446

View: 8210

For the Anishinaabeg people, who span a vast geographic region from the Great Lakes to the Plains and beyond, stories are vessels of knowledge. They are bagijiganan, offerings of the possibilities within Anishinaabeg life. Existing along a broad narrative spectrum, from aadizookaanag (traditional or sacred narratives) to dibaajimowinan (histories and news)—as well as everything in between—storytelling is one of the central practices and methods of individual and community existence. Stories create and understand, survive and endure, revitalize and persist. They honor the past, recognize the present, and provide visions of the future. In remembering, (re)making, and (re)writing stories, Anishinaabeg storytellers have forged a well-traveled path of agency, resistance, and resurgence. Respecting this tradition, this groundbreaking anthology features twenty-four contributors who utilize creative and critical approaches to propose that this people’s stories carry dynamic answers to questions posed within Anishinaabeg communities, nations, and the world at large. Examining a range of stories and storytellers across time and space, each contributor explores how narratives form a cultural, political, and historical foundation for Anishinaabeg Studies. Written by Anishinaabeg and non-Anishinaabeg scholars, storytellers, and activists, these essays draw upon the power of cultural expression to illustrate active and ongoing senses of Anishinaabeg life. They are new and dynamic bagijiganan, revealing a viable and sustainable center for Anishinaabeg Studies, what it has been, what it is, what it can be.
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Author: Marcelo Svirsky

Publisher: Edinburgh University Press

ISBN: 0748649263

Category: Philosophy

Page: 304

View: 838

This collection of essays evaluates Agamben's work from a postcolonial perspective. Svirsky and Bignall assemble leading figures to explore the rich philosophical linkages and the political concerns shared by Agamben and postcolonial theory.
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Author: Frederick E. Hoxie

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0190614021

Category: History

Page: N.A

View: 807

"Everything you know about Indians is wrong." As the provocative title of Paul Chaat Smith's 2009 book proclaims, everyone knows about Native Americans, but most of what they know is the fruit of stereotypes and vague images. The real people, real communities, and real events of indigenous America continue to elude most people. The Oxford Handbook of American Indian History confronts this erroneous view by presenting an accurate and comprehensive history of the indigenous peoples who lived-and live-in the territory that became the United States. Thirty-two leading experts, both Native and non-Native, describe the historical developments of the past 500 years in American Indian history, focusing on significant moments of upheaval and change, histories of indigenous occupation, and overviews of Indian community life. The first section of the book charts Indian history from before 1492 to European invasions and settlement, analyzing US expansion and its consequences for Indian survival up to the twenty-first century. A second group of essays consists of regional and tribal histories. The final section illuminates distinctive themes of Indian life, including gender, sexuality and family, spirituality, art, intellectual history, education, public welfare, legal issues, and urban experiences. A much-needed and eye-opening account of American Indians, this Handbook unveils the real history often hidden behind wrong assumptions, offering stimulating ideas and resources for new generations to pursue research on this topic.
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The Rise of Human Rights in Native America and the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples

Author: Walter R. Echo-Hawk

Publisher: Fulcrum Publishing

ISBN: 1938486072

Category: Social Science

Page: 352

View: 5983

In 2007 the United Nations approved the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples. United States endorsement in 2010 ushered in a new era of Indian law and policy. This book highlights steps that the United States, as well as other nations, must take to provide a more just society and heal past injustices committed against indigenous peoples.
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An Annotated Bibliography

Author: Wade Davies,Richmond L. Clow

Publisher: Scarecrow Press

ISBN: 0810862360

Category: History

Page: 648

View: 1300

American Indian Sovereignty and Law: An Annotated Bibliography covers a wide variety of topics and includes sources dealing with federal Indian policy, federal and tribal courts, criminal justice, tribal governance, religious freedoms, economic development, and numerous sub-topics related to tribal and individual rights. While primarily focused on the years 1900 to the present, many sources are included that focus on the 19th century or earlier. The annotations included in this reference will help researchers know enough about the arguments and contents of each source to determine its usefulness. Whenever a clear central argument is made in an article or book, it is stated in the entry, unless that argument is made implicit by the title of that entry. Each annotation also provides factual information about the primary topic under discussion. In some cases, annotations list topics that compose a significant portion of an author's discussion but are not obvious from the title of the entry. American Indian Sovereignty and Law will be extremely useful in both studying Native American topics and researching current legal and political actions affecting tribal sovereignty.
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The Display and Erasure of Indigenous Peoples in Japanese and American Nation Building Projects

Author: Danika Fawn Medak-Saltzman

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category:

Page: 418

View: 6577

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Annual Meeting : Groundwork : Space and Place in American Cultures

Author: American Studies Association. Meeting

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category:

Page: 256

View: 772

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Author: Cynthia Soohoo,Catherine Albisa,Martha F. Davis

Publisher: Praeger Publishers

ISBN: 9780275988241

Category: Civil rights

Page: 851

View: 4705

This three-volume set chronicles the history of human rights in the United States from the perspective of domestic social justice activism. First, the set examines the political forces and historic events that resulted in the U.S.'s failure to embrace human rights principles at home while actively (albeit selectively) championing and promoting human rights abroad. It then considers the current explosion of human rights activism around issues within the United States and the way human rights is transforming domestic social justice work. The first volume provides a historical perspective on the United States' ambivalent relationship with the international human rights movement. It examines the implications of recognizing domestic rights violations as a matter of international concern and the relationship between international and domestic law. It also addresses the role the Cold War and Southern opposition to international scrutiny of its Jim Crow policies and segregation played in shaping U.S. attitudes toward human rights generally and social and economic rights in particular. These factors forced social justice organizations to largely abandon employing a human rights framework in their domestic work and had a lasting impact on U.S. perspectives about fundamental rights and the role of government. The set also chronicles current domestic human rights work. Volumes two and three consider why domestic activists currently are using human rights and the tactical advantages and practical challenges posed by such strategies. These volumes cover everything from globalization to terrorism and the erosion of civil rights protections that led to a renewed interest in human rights; human rightsversus civil rights strategies; and the different ways human rights can support social activism.
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Author: Garrick A. Bailey,William C. Sturtevant

Publisher: United States Govt Printing Office

ISBN: 9780160803888

Category: Social Science

Page: 579

View: 6925

Encyclopedic summary of prehistory, history, cultures and political and social aspects of native peoples in Siberia, Alaska, the Canadian Arctic and Greenland.
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American Indian law and literature : materials presented at the Fourth Annual Indigenous Law Conference, Michigan State University College of Law, Oct. 19-20, 2007

Author: University of Oklahoma. College of Law

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 327

View: 7624

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Author: Vine Deloria

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9783889774590

Category:

Page: 191

View: 2603

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Dedicated to a Better Understanding of Ethnic, Racial, and Religious Diversity

Author: N.A

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Intercultural communication

Page: N.A

View: 3856

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Author: Jacki Thompson Rand

Publisher: U of Nebraska Press

ISBN: N.A

Category: History

Page: 198

View: 3534

Colonialism attacked the Kiowas on the most human, everyday level - through starvation, outbreaks of smallpox, emotional disorientation, and continual difficulties in securing clothing and shelter, and the Kiowas' responses and counterassertions of sovereignty thus tended to focus on efforts to feed their people, sustain the physical community, and preserve psychic equilibrium."--BOOK JACKET.
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Leitfaden zum Verständnis der einzigen noch verbliebenen Supermacht der Welt

Author: William Blum

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9783897065307

Category:

Page: 328

View: 9651

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