A Brief History and Guide

Author: Christine Ferdinand

Publisher: Scala Arts Publishers Incorporated

ISBN: 9781785510267

Category:

Page: 72

View: 4783

Magdalen College is one of the most beautiful of the Oxford colleges. Founded in 1458, it was built in the extensive grounds of the suppressed Hospital of St John the Baptist (an institution dating from at least 1180), outside the east gate of the medieval city walls. Over the centuries the College has built and rebuilt itself, developing an impressive physical presence, from the Old Kitchen - a remnant of the Hospital - to its late medieval Cloister, Chapel and Hall, the Great Tower, the beautiful eighteenth-century New Building, St Swithun's Quad, up to the new Library in Longwall Quad, finished in 2016. It is unique in possessing a College Deer Park, and its Muniment Room is a very rare example of a late fifteenth-century space still furnished with its original oak furniture and fittings. Magdalen has a rich and complicated academic, architectural and personal history, which is presented here, along with notes on what visitors can see today.
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Author: Michael J. Gilmour

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 1137552980

Category: Philosophy

Page: 219

View: 6595

This book examines C. S. Lewis’s writings about animals, and the theological bases of his opposition to vivisection and other cruelties. It argues Genesis is central to many of these ethical musings and the book’s organization reflects this. It treats in turn Lewis’s creative approaches to the Garden of Eden, humanity’s “dominion” over the earth, and the loss of paradise with all the catastrophic consequences for animals it presaged. The book closes looking at Lewis’s vision of a more inclusive community. Though he left no comprehensive summary of his ideas, the Narnia adventures and science fiction trilogy, scattered poems and his popular theology inspire affection and sympathy for the nonhuman. This study challenges scholars to reassess Lewis as not only a literary critic and children’s author but also an animal theologian of consequence, though there is much here for all fans of Mr. Bultitude and Reepicheep to explore.
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A History

Author: L. W. B. Brockliss

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0191017302

Category: History

Page: 720

View: 9976

This fresh and readable account gives a complete history of the University of Oxford, from its beginnings in the eleventh century to the present day. Written by one of the leading authorities on the history of universities internationally, it traces Oxford's improbable rise from provincial backwater to one of the world's leading centres of research and teaching. Laurence Brockliss sees Oxford's history as one of discontinuity as much as continuity, describing it in four distinct parts. First he explores Oxford as 'The Catholic University' in the centuries before the Reformation, when it was principally a clerical studium serving the needs of the Western church. Then as 'The Anglican University', in the years from 1534 to 1845 when Oxford was confessionally closed to other religions, it trained the next generation of ministers of the Church of England, and acted as a finishing school for the sons of the gentry and the well-to-do. After 1845 'The Imperial University' saw the emergence over the following century of a new Oxford - a university which was still elitist but now non-confessional; became open to women as well as men; took students from all round the Empire; and was held together at least until 1914 by a novel concept of Christian service. The final part, 'The World University', takes the story forward from 1945 to the present day, and describes Oxford's development as a modern meritocratic and secular university with an ever-growing commitment to high-quality academic research. Throughout the book, Oxford's history is placed in the wider context of the history of higher education in the UK, Europe, and the world. This helps to show how singular Oxford's evolution has been: a story not of entitlement but of hard work, difficult decisions, and a creative use of limited resources and advantages to keep its destiny in its own hands.
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A Nation Under Arms, 1939–1945

Author: Nicholas Stargardt

Publisher: Basic Books

ISBN: 0465073972

Category: History

Page: 760

View: 8308

As early as 1941, Allied victory in World War II seemed all but assured. How and why, then, did the Germans prolong the barbaric conflict for three and a half more years? In The German War, acclaimed historian Nicholas Stargardt draws on an extraordinary range of primary source materials—personal diaries, court records, and military correspondence—to answer this question. He offers an unprecedented portrait of wartime Germany, bringing the hopes and expectations of the German people—from infantrymen and tank commanders on the Eastern front to civilians on the home front—to vivid life. While most historians identify the German defeat at Stalingrad as the moment when the average German citizen turned against the war effort, Stargardt demonstrates that the Wehrmacht in fact retained the staunch support of the patriotic German populace until the bitter end. Astonishing in its breadth and humanity, The German War is a groundbreaking new interpretation of what drove the Germans to fight—and keep fighting—for a lost cause.
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Author: Oliver Taplin

Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA

ISBN: 9780192893031

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 299

View: 3444

'Our present appreciation of Greek and Roman literature should be informed and influenced by consideration of what it was originally appreciated for. The past, for all its alienness, affects and changes the present.'The focus of this book - its new perspective - is on the 'receivers' of literature: readers, spectators, and audiences. Six contributors, drawn from both sides of the Atlantic, explore the various and changing interactions between the makers of literature and their audiences or readers from theearliest Greek poetry through to the drama, history, and philosophy of Greece under Roman rule.The contributors deploy fresh insights to map out lively and provocative, yet accessible, surveys. They cover the kinds of literature which have shaped western culture - epic, lyric, tragedy, comedy, history, philosophy, rhetoric, epigram, elegy, pastoral, satire, biography, epistle, declamation,and panegyric. Who were the audiences, and why did they regard their literature as so important?
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Author: Simon Horobin

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0198709250

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 168

View: 3006

The English language is spoken by more than a billion people throughout the world. But where did English come from? And how has it evolved into the language used today?In this Very Short Introduction Simon Horobin investigates how we have arrived at the English we know today, and celebrates the way new speakers and new uses mean that it continues to adapt. Engaging with contemporary concerns about correctness, Horobin considers whether such changes areimprovements, or evidence of slipping standards. What is the future for the English language? Will Standard English continue to hold sway, or we are witnessing its replacement by newly emerging Englishes?ABOUT THE SERIES: The Very Short Introductions series from Oxford University Press contains hundreds of titles in almost every subject area. These pocket-sized books are the perfect way to get ahead in a new subject quickly. Our expert authors combine facts, analysis, perspective, new ideas, andenthusiasm to make interesting and challenging topics highly readable.
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The Promise and Perils of Work in the Gig Economy

Author: Jeremias Prassl

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 019879701X

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 208

View: 9554

The digital revolution is changing the way we work. Online platforms like Amazon's Mechanical Turk and Uber connect workers and consumers directly, promising both convenience and flexibility. But convenience comes at a price. Traditional protections for workers have been denied to those selling their services in the 'gig' economy. Algorithms can discriminate and deny workers their livelihoods without chance of reply. In 'Humans as a Service' Jeremias Prassl cutsthrough the rhetoric of the sharing economy to expose the systematic exploitation of the new class of digital workers. He shows how legal reform can end the exploitation and restore worker protectionfor the digital age.
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Author: Michael Allingham

Publisher: OUP Oxford

ISBN: 0191579262

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 144

View: 1901

We make choices all the time - about trivial matters, about how to spend our money, about how to spend our time, about what to do with our lives. And we are also constantly judging the decisions other people make as rational or irrational. But what kind of criteria are we applying when we say that a choice is rational? What guides our own choices, especially in cases where we don't have complete information about the outcomes? What strategies should be applied in making decisions which affect a lot of people, as in the case of government policy? This book explores what it means to be rational in all these contexts. It introduces ideas from economics, philosophy, and other areas, showing how the theory applies to decisions in everyday life, and to particular situations such as gambling and the allocation of resources. ABOUT THE SERIES: The Very Short Introductions series from Oxford University Press contains hundreds of titles in almost every subject area. These pocket-sized books are the perfect way to get ahead in a new subject quickly. Our expert authors combine facts, analysis, perspective, new ideas, and enthusiasm to make interesting and challenging topics highly readable.
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England 1360-1461

Author: Gerald Harriss,G. L. Harriss

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780199211197

Category: History

Page: 705

View: 2372

The Black Death, the Peasants' Revolt, the Hundred Years War, the War of the Roses... A succession of dramatic social and political events reshaped England in the period 1360 to 1461. In his lucid and penetrating account of this formative period, Gerald Harriss illuminates a richly varied society, as chronicled in The Canterbury Tales, and examines its developing sense of national identity.
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A Journal of Literature, Science, the Fine Arts, Music, and the Drama

Author: James Silk Buckingham,John Sterling,Frederick Denison Maurice,Henry Stebbing,Charles Wentworth Dilke,Thomas Kibble Hervey,William Hepworth Dixon,Norman Maccoll,Vernon Horace Rendall,John Middleton Murry

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category:

Page: N.A

View: 8227

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Author: Dominic Head

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 0521831792

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 1241

View: 3211

A reference guide to world literature in English includes information on writers, works, genres, and movements.
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Author: Geoffrey Tyack

Publisher: Bodleian Library, University of Oxford

ISBN: 9781851242740

Category: Architecture

Page: 56

View: 1241

One of the oldest libraries in Britain, the Bodleian Library has been in continuous use since its founding in 1602 by Sir Thomas Bodley. This richly illustrated guidebook is perfect for architectural aficionados or those planning a trip. A short introduction that gives the story of the library’s founding is followed by a succinct guide to the buildings found there, from Duke Humfrey’s Library to the Divinity School, Convocation House, Schools Quadrangle, Clarendon Building, and Radcliffe Camera. Bodleian Library Souvenir Guide covers more than four centuries of the library’s most celebrated architecture, taking a look back at the contributions of famous architects like Sir Christopher Wren and Nicholas Hawksmoor. In addition to the buildings themselves, the book illustrates some of the Bodleian’s most exquisite stonemasonry and statuary found there. It also provides translations to the intriguing Latin inscriptions that adorn many of the buildings and mark key moments in the library’s history. The book is brought up-to-date with a description of subsequent renovations, including the addition of the state-of-the-art Weston Library to house the library’s special collections.
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Author: Arthur E. P. Weigall

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1136206590

Category: History

Page: 652

View: 2749

First published in 2005. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.
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