100 Years of the Texas Highway Department

Author: Carol Dawson,Roger Allen Polson

Publisher: Texas A&M University Press

ISBN: 1623494575

Category: History

Page: 420

View: 6852

On the eve of its centennial, Carol Dawson and Roger Allen Polson present almost 100 years of history and never-before-seen photographs that track the development of the Texas Highway Department. An agency originally created “to get the farmer out of the mud,” it has gone on to build the vast network of roads that now connects every corner of the state. When the Texas Highway Department (now called the Texas Department of Transportation or TxDOT) was created in 1917, there were only about 200,000 cars in Texas traveling on fewer than a thousand miles of paved roads. Today, after 100 years of the Texas Highway Department, the state boasts over 80,000 miles of paved, state-maintained roads that accommodate more than 25 million vehicles. Sure to interest history enthusiasts and casual readers alike, decades of progress and turmoil, development and disaster, and politics and corruption come together once more in these pages, which tell the remarkable story of an infrastructure 100 years in the making.
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Author: Carolyn E. Boyd

Publisher: Texas A&M University Press

ISBN: 9781585442591

Category: Art

Page: 139

View: 5362

Four thousand years ago bands of hunter-gatherers lived in and traveled through the challenging terrain of what is now southwest Texas and northern Mexico. Today travelers to that land can view large art panels they left behind on the rock walls of Rattlesnake Canyon, White Shaman Cave, Panther Cave, Mystic Shelter, and Cedar Springs. Messages from a distant past, they are now interpreted for modern readers by artist-archaeologist Carolyn Boyd. It has been thought that the meaning of this ancient art was lost with the artists who produced it. However, thanks to research breakthroughs, these elaborate rock paintings are again communicating a narrative that was inaccessible to humanity for millennia. In the gateway serpents, antlered shamans, and human-animal–cross forms pictured in these ancient murals, Boyd sees a way that ancient hunter-gatherer artists could express their belief systems, provide a mechanism for social and environmental adaptation, and act as agents in the social, economic, and ideological affairs of the community. She offers detailed information gleaned from the art regarding the nature of the lower Pecos cosmos, ritual practices involving the use of sacramental and medicinal plants, and hunter-gatherer lifeways. Now, combining the tools of the ethnologist with the aesthetic sensibilities of an artist, Boyd demonstrates that prehistoric art is not beyond explanation. Images from the past contain a vast corpus of data—accessible through proven, scientific methods—that can enrich our understanding of human life in prehistory and, at the same time, expand our appreciation for the work of art in the present and the future.
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A Guide to Texas Roadside Historical Markers

Author: Betty Dooley Awbrey,Stuart Awbrey

Publisher: Taylor Trade Publishing

ISBN: 1589797906

Category: Travel

Page: 544

View: 9140

This guide to more than 2,500 Texas roadside markers features historical events; famous and infamous Texans; origins of towns, churches, and organizations; battles, skirmishes, and gunfights; and settlers, pioneers, Indians, and outlaws. With the most up-to-date records available, this sixth edition includes more than 100 new historical roadside markers with the actual inscriptions. Handy and simple to use, it lists alphabetically the hundreds of cities and towns nearest the markers and pinpoints each marker with specific highway and mileage information. With this book, travelers relive the tragedies and triumphs of Lone Star history.
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Author: Mapsco, Inc,Texas A. & M. University

Publisher: Shearer Pub

ISBN: 9781569663059

Category: Travel

Page: 176

View: 8639

Identifies over 25,000 state and county roads.
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A Round-the-World Bicycle Adventure

Author: Barbara Savage

Publisher: The Mountaineers Books

ISBN: 1594853940

Category: Travel

Page: 340

View: 8030

* A well-loved, classic tale of adventure * Read this and you'll find yourself recommending it to friends again and again This is the story of Barbara and Larry Savage's sometimes dangerous, often zany, but ultimately rewarding 23,000 miles global bicycle odyssey, which took them through 25 countries in two years. Miles From Nowhere is an adventure not to be missed! Along the way, these near-neophyte cyclists encountered warm-hearted strangers eager to share food and shelter, bicycle-hating drivers who shoved them off the road, various wild animals (including a roof ape and an attack camel), sacred cows, rock-throwing Egyptians, overprotective Thai policeman, motherly New Zealanders, meteorological disasters, bodily indignities, and great personal joys. The stress of traveling together constantly for two years tested and ultimately strengthened the young couple's relationship. As their trip ends you'll find yourself yearning for Barbara and Larry to mount back up and keep pedaling. It's a story that makes you feel like you've grown right along with the author.
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Author: A. C. Greene

Publisher: University of North Texas Press

ISBN: 1574412132

Category: History

Page: 293

View: 7313

"Remember, boys, nothing on God's earth must stop the United States mail!" said John Butterfield to his drivers. Short as the life of the Southern Overland Mail turned out to be (1858 to 1861), the saga of the Butterfield Trail remains a high point in the westward movement. A.C. Greene offers a history and guide to retrace that historic and romantic Trail, which stretches 2800 miles from the Mississippi River to the Pacific coast.
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The First Road to Texas from the North

Author: Gary L. Pinkerton

Publisher: Texas A&M University Press

ISBN: 1623494699

Category: History

Page: 304

View: 1243

Trammel’s Trace tells the story of a borderlands smuggler and an important passageway into early Texas. Trammel’s Trace, named for Nicholas Trammell, was the first route from the United States into the northern boundaries of Spanish Texas. From the Great Bend of the Red River it intersected with El Camino Real de los Tejas in Nacogdoches. By the early nineteenth century, Trammel’s Trace was largely a smuggler’s trail that delivered horses and contraband into the region. It was a microcosm of the migration, lawlessness, and conflict that defined the period. By the 1820s, as Mexico gained independence from Spain, smuggling declined as Anglo immigration became the primary use of the trail. Familiar names such as Sam Houston, David Crockett, and James Bowie joined throngs of immigrants making passage along Trammel’s Trace. Indeed, Nicholas Trammell opened trading posts on the Red River and near Nacogdoches, hoping to claim a piece of Austin’s new colony. Austin denied Trammell’s entry, however, fearing his poor reputation would usher in a new wave of smuggling and lawlessness. By 1826, Trammell was pushed out of Texas altogether and retreated back to Arkansas Even so, as author Gary L. Pinkerton concludes, Trammell was “more opportunist than outlaw and made the most of disorder.”
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Author: Gunnar M. Brune

Publisher: Texas A&M University Press

ISBN: 9781585441969

Category: Nature

Page: 566

View: 8690

This text explores the natural history of Texas and more than 2900 springs in 183 Texas counties. It also includes an in-depth discussion of the general characteristics of springs - their physical and prehistoric settings, their historical significance, and their associated flora and fauna.
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Including the Hill Country

Author: Charles Llewellin,Johnny Molloy

Publisher: Menasha Ridge Press

ISBN: 1634040414

Category: Travel

Page: 288

View: 3771

The San Antonio and Austin areas are steeped in history -- San Antonio's Alamo stands as a symbol of Texas' fierce independence, while Austin is recognized as the cradle of Texas statehood. This area is also known for some of the most impressive hiking in the Lone Star State. 60 Hikes Within 60 Miles: San Antonio and Austin by veteran authors Charlie Llewellin and Johnny Molloy guides readers to the best trails found in the Texas Hill Country, all within easy reach of these two cities. The guide takes you to secluded, low traffic areas as well as those that are more popular and heavily used. The former LBJ Ranch, the Gaudalupe River, the Highland Lakes Chain, and the Lost Pines area are just some of the spectacular places covered. With this new edition in the best-selling 60 Hikes Within 60 Miles series, all these visually stunning and ruggedly charming routes are at the traveler's fingertips. This handy guide helps San Antonio and Austin natives get back into nature, with many options right in town. Extensive at-a-glance information makes it easy to choose the perfect hike based on length, difficulty, scenery, or on a specific factor such as hikes good for families, runners, or birding. Each trail profile includes maps, directions, driving times, nearby attractions, and other pertinent details.
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Author: E Dan Klepper

Publisher: Mountaineers Books

ISBN: 1594855404

Category: Travel

Page: 253

View: 962

100 of the most gorgeous hikes in the Lone Star State! The big sky country of Texas calls hikers of all kinds to its trails. With over 80 parks, 56 wildlife management areas, nine natural areas and 28 historic sites and parklands, this vast state offers a plethora of hiking options to choose from. Regions covered include the Panhandle Plains, prairies and lakes, piney woods, Gulf Coast, South Texas Plains, Hill country, and Big Bend country. This two-color guide includes elevation profiles, sidebar tips, topographic maps, and a handy Hikes-at-a-Glance chart to help readers find the hikes they want quickly and easily. Whether you're planning an extended backpacking trip through the northern cross timber or a short day hike just outside of town, this new guidebook presents a wonderful variety of iconic Texas trails.
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The Incredible Story of the U.S. Interstate System

Author: Dan McNichol

Publisher: Sterling Publishing Company, Inc.

ISBN: 9781402734687

Category: History

Page: 255

View: 9086

The year 2006 celebrates the 50th anniversary of the U.S. Interstate System, the most incredible road system in the world. Created by Dwight D. Eisenhower, whose WW II experiences taught him the necessity of a superhighway for military transport and evacuation in wartime, today's Interstate System is what connects our coasts and our borders, our cities and small towns. It's made possible our suburban lifestyle and caused the vast proliferation of businesses from HoJos to Holiday Inns. And if you order something online, most likely it's a truck barreling along an interstate that gets the product to your door. Written by bestselling author Dan McNichol, The Roads that Built America is the fascinating story of the largest engineering project the world has ever known.
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Author: Stephen Harrigan

Publisher: Vintage

ISBN: 0525431810

Category: Fiction

Page: 592

View: 7574

Originally published as hardcover: New York: Alfred A. Knopf, 2000.
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Tales from America's Contemporary Frontier

Author: Dayton Duncan

Publisher: U of Nebraska Press

ISBN: 9780803266278

Category: Travel

Page: 320

View: 2874

"In this splendid book a gifted observer and a terrific idea have come together in a real love match. In 1990, a century after the census bureau's famous observation of the frontier's imminent end, Dayton Duncan set out in an aging GMC Suburban to visit a large sampling of counties outside Alaska that have fewer than two persons per square milethe bureau's old standard for places still in a frontier condition. There are 132 such counties. All are in the West. . . . The result of his tour is an insightful and entertaining book, troubling and funny and consistently illuminating. . . . Much of the book's charm comes from Duncan's sketches of people who choose to live 'miles from nowhere'ranchers in the Nebraska sandhills, a New Mexican bar owner, a priest and United Parcel Service driver along the Texas-Mexico border, and the descendant of a Seminole Negro army scout in west Texas. In them he finds characteristics associated with the mythic frontier. . . . Great fun to read."Montana Born and raised in a small town in Iowa, Dayton Duncan has been a reporter, humor columnist, editorial writer, chief of staff to a governor, and deputy press secretary for presidential campaigns. He lives in Walpole, New Hampshire. His books include Out West: An American Journey, also available in a Bison Books edition.
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A novel

Author: Stephen Harrigan

Publisher: Vintage

ISBN: 1101946865

Category: Fiction

Page: 432

View: 7302

The author of the best-selling The Gates of the Alamo now gives us a galvanizing portrait of Abraham Lincoln during a crucially revealing period of his life, the early Springfield years, when he risked both his sanity and his ethical bearings as he searched for the great destiny he believed to be his. It is Illinois in the 1830s and 1840s. Abraham Lincoln is a circuit-riding lawyer, a member of the state legislature, a man of almost ungovernable ambition. To his friends he is also a beloved figure, by turns charmingly awkward and mesmerizingly self-possessed—a man of whom they, too, expect big things. Among his friends and political colleagues are Joshua Speed, William Herndon, Stephen Douglas, and many others who have come to the exploding frontier town of Springfield to find their futures. It is through another friend, a fictional poet, Cage Weatherby, that we will come to know Lincoln in his twenties and thirties, as a series of formative, surprising incidents unfolds—his service in the Black Hawk War, his participation in a poetry-writing society, a challenge to a duel that begins as a farce but quickly rises to lethal potential . . . Cage both admires and clashes with Lincoln, sometimes questioning his legal ethics and his cautious stance on slavery. But he is by Lincoln’s side as Lincoln slips back and forth between high spirits and soul-hollowing sadness and depression, and as he recovers from a disastrous courtship of one woman to marry the beautiful, capricious, politically savvy Mary Todd. It is Mary who will bring stability to Lincoln’s life, but who will also trigger a conflict that sends the two men on very different paths into the future. Historically accurate, rich in character, filled with the juice and dreams and raw ambitions of Americans on the make in an early frontier city, A Friend of Mr. Lincoln is a revelatory and moving portrayal of Abraham Lincoln in his young manhood. It is a close-up, involving experience, the sort of vibrant glimpse beneath the veneer of history that only the very best fiction can provide. From the Hardcover edition.
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Cold Case : the Yogurt Shop Murders

Author: Beverly Lowry

Publisher: Vintage

ISBN: 0307739880

Category: HISTORY

Page: 528

View: 4133

"On December 6, 1991, the naked, bound-and-gagged bodies of ... four girls--each one shot in the head--were found in an I Can't Believe It's Yogurt! shop in Austin, Texas. Grief, shock, and horror spread out from their families and friends to overtake the city itself. Though all branches of law enforcement were brought to bear, the investigation was often misdirected and after eight years only two men (then teenagers) were tried; moreover, their subsequent convictions were eventually overturned, and Austin PD detectives are still working on what is now a very cold case"--
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A Guide to 85 of the State's Greatest Hiking Adventures

Author: Laurence Parent

Publisher: Falcon Guides

ISBN: 9780762723232

Category: Sports & Recreation

Page: 272

View: 7636

This exclusive travel guide guides the visitor through the most incredible activities to be found in Shanghai: savour the food of world-class chefs in Asia's most romantic two-seater salon; eat at the best holes-in-the-walls and discover local street food haunts; find the best tailors and quality cashmere, satins and brocades by the yard; expert ......
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A Journey Through Texas Barbecue

Author: Daniel Vaughn

Publisher: Harper Collins

ISBN: 0062202952

Category: Cooking

Page: 384

View: 9318

The debut title in the Anthony Bourdain Books line, The Prophets of Smoked Meat by “Barbecue Snob” Daniel Vaughn, author of the enormously popular blog Full Custom Gospel BBQ, is a rollicking journey through the heart of Texas Barbecue. From brisket to ribs, beef to pork, mesquite to oak, this fully illustrated, comprehensive guide to Texas barbecue includes pit masters’ recipes, tales of the road—from country meat markets to roadside stands, sumptuous photography, and a panoramic look at the Lone Star State, where smoked meat is sacred.
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Author: N.A

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Industries

Page: N.A

View: 3567

Beginning in 1956 each vol. includes as a regular number the Blue book of southern progress and the Southern industrial directory, formerly issued separately.
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A Fortnightly Review of Railway Practice; Extraordinary Cases in the Last Ten Years Described ...

Author: N.A

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Railroads

Page: N.A

View: 1130

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