The Ironies Of Household Technology From The Open Hearth To The Microwave

Author: Ruth Schwartz Cowan

Publisher: Basic Books

ISBN: 9780465047321

Category: Social Science

Page: 288

View: 8177

In this classic work of women's history (winner of the 1984 Dexter Prize from the Society for the History of Technology), Ruth Schwartz Cowan shows how and why modern women devote as much time to housework as did their colonial sisters. In lively and provocative prose, Cowan explains how the modern conveniences—washing machines, white flour, vacuums, commercial cotton—seemed at first to offer working-class women middle-class standards of comfort. Over time, however, it became clear that these gadgets and gizmos mainly replaced work previously conducted by men, children, and servants. Instead of living lives of leisure, middle-class women found themselves struggling to keep up with ever higher standards of cleanliness.
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A History of American Housework

Author: Susan Strasser

Publisher: Macmillan

ISBN: 9780805067743

Category: History

Page: 384

View: 3882

Finally back in print, with a new Preface by the author, this lively, authoritative, and pathbreaking study considers the history of material advances and domestic service, the "women's separate sphere," and the respective influences of advertising, home economics, and women's entry into the workforce. Never Done begins by describing the household chores of nineteenth-century America: cooking at fireplaces and on cast-iron stoves, laundry done with boilers and flatirons, endless water-hauling and fire-tending, and so on. Strasser goes on to explain and explore how industrialization transformed the nature of women's work. Easing some tasks and eliminating others, new commercial processes inexorably altered women's daily lives and relationships—with each other and with those they served.
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Technology and Republican Values in America, 1776-1900

Author: John F. Kasson

Publisher: Macmillan

ISBN: 9780809016204

Category: History

Page: 274

View: 5263

A major theme in American history has been the desire to achieve a genuinely republican way of life that values liberty, order, and virtue. This work shows us how new technologies affected this drive for a republican civilization - a question as vital now as ever.
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A Century of Buying, Driving, and Fixing Cars

Author: Katherine J. Parkin

Publisher: University of Pennsylvania Press

ISBN: 0812249534

Category: History

Page: 272

View: 1320

Women at the Wheel shows how stereotypes of women as uninterested in automobiles and, more perniciously, as poor drivers, has little basis in historical reality. However, Katherine J. Parkin argues that in American culture women are still considered imposters when they are at the wheel.
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The Joys of Housework

Author: Margaret Horsfield

Publisher: Palgrave Macmillan

ISBN: 9780312220839

Category: History

Page: 320

View: 4579

Examines the history and sociology of housework and draws upon research, interviews, and characters from television, literature, and advertising to explore how, why, and who does the cleaning
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Author: Marc Auge

Publisher: Verso Books

ISBN: 1781685681

Category: Social Science

Page: 112

View: 4985

For Marc Augé, best-selling author of Non-Places, the prevailing idea of “the Future” rests on our present fears of the contemporary world. It is to the future that we look for redemption and progress; but it is also where we project our personal and apocalyptic anxieties. By questioning notions of certainty, truth, and totality, Augé finds ways to separate the future from our eternal, terrified present and liberates the mind to allow it to conceptualize our possible futures afresh. From the Trade Paperback edition.
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The Rise and Fall of Domesticity in America

Author: Glenna Matthews

Publisher: Oxford University Press on Demand

ISBN: 0195059255

Category: History

Page: 281

View: 8413

Housewives constitute a large section of the population, yet they have received very little attention, let alone respect. Glenna Matthews, who herself spent many years as "just a housewife" before becoming a scholar of American history, sets out to redress this imbalance. While the male world of work has always received the most respect, Matthews maintains that widespread reverence for the home prevailed in the nineteenth century. The early stages of industrialization made possible a strong tradition of cooking, baking, and sewing that gave women great satisfaction and a place in the world. Viewed as the center of republican virtue, the home also played an important religious role. Examining novels, letters, popular magazines, and cookbooks, Matthews seeks to depict what women had and what they have lost in modern times. She argues that the culture of professionalism in the late nineteenth century and the culture of consumption that came to fruition in the 1920s combined to kill off the "cult of domesticity." This important, challenging book sheds new light on a central aspect of human experience: the essential task of providing a society's nurture and daily maintenance.
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Social Meanings of a New Technology, 1880-1940

Author: David E. Nye

Publisher: Mit Press

ISBN: 9780262640305

Category: History

Page: 479

View: 9460

Explores how electricity seeped into and redefined American culture, becoming fundamental to modern life.
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Middle-class Women & Domestic Material Culture, 1840-1940

Author: Marilyn Ferris Motz,Pat Browne

Publisher: Popular Press

ISBN: 9780879724344

Category: Family & Relationships

Page: 212

View: 3161

The transformation of a house into a home has been in our culture a traditional task of women. The articles examine this process as they reflected the role of American middle-class women as homemakers in the years 1840–1940.
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Author: William W. Braham,Jonathan A. Hale

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1134279345

Category: Architecture

Page: 488

View: 3348

This essential reference for all students of architecture, design and the built environment provides a convenient single source for all the key texts in the recent literature on architecture and technology. The book contains over fifty carefully selected essays, manifestoes, reflections and theories by architects and architectural writers from 1900 to 2004. This mapping out of a century of architectural technology reveals the discipline's long and close attention to the experience and effects of new technologies, and provides a broad picture of the shift from the 'age of tools' to the 'age of systems'. Chronological arrangement and cross-referencing of the articles enable both a thematic and historically contextual understanding of the topic and highlight important thematic connections across time. With the ever increasing pace of technological change, this Reader presents a clear understanding of the context in which it has and does affect architecture.
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The Impact of Mountaintop Removal Surface Coal Mining on Southern West Virginia Communities, 1970-2004

Author: N.A

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 214

View: 9969

Coal is West Virginia's bread and butter. For more than a century, West Virginia has answered the energy call of the nation--and the world--by mining and exporting its coal. In 2004, West Virginia's coal industry provided almost forty thousand jobs directly related to coal, and it contributed $3.5 billion to the state's gross annual product. And in the same year, West Virginia led the nation in coal exports, shipping over 50 million tons of coal to twenty-three countries. Coal has made millionaires of some and paupers of many. For generations of honest, hard-working West Virginians, coal has put food on tables, built homes, and sent students to college. But coal has also maimed, debilitated, and killed. Bringing Down the Mountains provides insight into how mountaintop removal has affected the people and the land of southern West Virginia. It examines the mechanization of the mining industry and the power relationships between coal interests, politicians, and the average citizen. Shirley Stewart Burns holds a BS in news-editorial journalism, a master's degree in social work, and a PhD in history with an Appalachian focus, from West Virginia University. A native of Wyoming County in the southern West Virginia coalfields and the daughter of an underground coal miner, she has a passionate interest in the communities, environment, and histories of the southern West Virginia coalfields. She lives in Charleston, West Virginia.
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Technology and the Domestic Ideal in America

Author: Priscilla J. Brewer

Publisher: Syracuse University Press

ISBN: 9780815606505

Category: Cooking

Page: 338

View: 3787

"Extensively documented - based on letters, diaries, probate inventories, census records, sales figures, advertisements, fiction, and advice literature - the book will be valuable to scholars of American history and women's studies."--BOOK JACKET.
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Author: Graeme Brooker,Lois Weinthal

Publisher: A&C Black

ISBN: 1472539044

Category: Design

Page: 672

View: 3590

The Handbook of Interior Architecture and Design offers a compelling collection of original essays that seek to examine the shifting role of interior architecture and interior design, and their importance and meaning within the contemporary world. Interior architecture and interior design are disciplines that span a complexity of ideas, ranging from human behaviour and anthropology to history and the technology of the future. Approaches to designing the interior are in a constant state of flux, reflecting and adapting to the changing systems of history, culture and politics. It is this process that allows interior design to be used as evidence for identifying patterns of consumption, gender, identity and social issues. The Handbook of Interior Architecture and Design provides a pioneering overview of the ideas and arrangements within the two disciplines that make them such important platforms from which to study the way humans interact with the space around them. Covering a wide range of thought and research, the book enables the reader to investigate fully the changing face of interior architecture and interior design, while offering questions about their future trajectory.
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Author: Richard Sclove

Publisher: Guilford Press

ISBN: 9780898628616

Category: Technology & Engineering

Page: 338

View: 9830

Intended for anyone interested in democracy and public policy, social justice and empowerment, political economy and business or the social consequences of technology and architecture.
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Author: Nigel Whiteley

Publisher: Reaktion Books

ISBN: 9780948462658

Category: Art

Page: 194

View: 7728

Although design has become eminently newsworthy among the general public in our society, there is very little understanding to be found of the values and implications that underlie it. Design generates much heat but little light: we live in a world that has much design consciousness, but little design awareness. Nigel Whiteley analyses design's role and status today, and discusses what our obsession with it tells us about our own culture. Design for Society is not an anti-design book; rather, it is an anti-consumerist-design book, in that it reveals what most people would agree are the socially and ecologically unsound values and unsatisfactory implications on which the system of consumerist design is constructed. In so doing, it prepares the ground for a more responsible and just type of design.
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Author: Mary Romero

Publisher: Psychology Press

ISBN: 9780415935418

Category: Social Science

Page: 242

View: 7126

This is a classic work in the fields of Women's Studies and Sociology. On its 10th Anniversary, it is still a vital and moving study of the lives of immigrant domestic workers, and is constantly cited in the research. Romero's new introduction will offer a fresh look at the material, including more recent events, proving that the issues discussed in the book are still very relevant to today's world.
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Author: Frank Trentmann

Publisher: Oxford University Press on Demand

ISBN: 0199561214

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 695

View: 8992

The Oxford Handbook of the History of Consumption offers a timely overview of how our understanding of consumption in history has changed in the last generation.
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How Consumer Culture Took Root in the Rural Midwest

Author: David Blanke

Publisher: Ohio University Press

ISBN: 0821413473

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 282

View: 9991

From 1840 to 1900, midwestern Americans experienced firsthand the profound economic, cultural, and structural changes that transformed the nation from a premodern, agrarian state to one that was urban, industrial, and economically interdependent. Midwestern commercial farmers found themselves at the heart of these changes. Their actions and reactions led to the formation of a distinctive and particularly democratic consumer ethos, which is still being played out today. By focusing on the consumer behavior of midwestern farmers, Sowing the American Dream provides illustrative examples of how Americans came to terms with the economic and ideological changes that swirled around them. From the formation of the Grange to the advent of mail-order catalogs, the buying patterns of rural midwesterners set the stage for the coming century. Carefully documenting the rise and fall of the powerful purchasing cooperatives, David Blanke explains the shifting trends in collective consumerism, which ultimately resulted in a significant change in the way that midwestern consumers pursued their own regional identity, community, and independence.
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Global Women's Issues and Knowledge

Author: Cheris Kramarae,Dale Spender

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1135963150

Category: Reference

Page: 2050

View: 8740

For a full list of entries and contributors, sample entries, and more, visit the Routledge International Encyclopedia of Women website. Featuring comprehensive global coverage of women's issues and concerns, from violence and sexuality to feminist theory, the Routledge International Encyclopedia of Women brings the field into the new millennium. In over 900 signed A-Z entries from US and Europe, Asia, the Americas, Oceania, and the Middle East, the women who pioneered the field from its inception collaborate with the new scholars who are shaping the future of women's studies to create the new standard work for anyone who needs information on women-related subjects.
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Amusement Parks, Movies, and American Modernity

Author: Lauren Rabinovitz

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN: 0231527217

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 256

View: 801

Amusement parks were the playgrounds of the working class in the early twentieth century, combining numerous, mechanically-based spectacles into one unique, modern cultural phenomenon. Lauren Rabinovitz describes the urban modernity engendered by these parks and their media, encouraging ordinary individuals to sense, interpret, and embody a burgeoning national identity. As industrialization, urbanization, and immigration upended society, amusement parks tempered the shocks of racial, ethnic, and cultural conflict while shrinking the distinctions between gender and class. Following the rise of American parks from 1896 to 1918, Rabinovitz seizes on a simultaneous increase in cinema and spectacle audiences and connects both to the success of leisure activities in stabilizing society. Critics of the time often condemned parks and movies for inciting moral decline, yet in fact they fostered women's independence, racial uplift, and assimilation. The rhythmic, mechanical movements of spectacle also conditioned audiences to process multiple stimuli. Featuring illustrations from private collections and accounts from unaccessed archives, Electric Dreamland joins film and historical analyses in a rare portrait of mass entertainment and the modern eye.
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