The Ironies Of Household Technology From The Open Hearth To The Microwave

Author: Ruth Schwartz Cowan

Publisher: Basic Books

ISBN: 9780465047321

Category: Social Science

Page: 288

View: 5596

In this classic work of women's history (winner of the 1984 Dexter Prize from the Society for the History of Technology), Ruth Schwartz Cowan shows how and why modern women devote as much time to housework as did their colonial sisters. In lively and provocative prose, Cowan explains how the modern conveniences—washing machines, white flour, vacuums, commercial cotton—seemed at first to offer working-class women middle-class standards of comfort. Over time, however, it became clear that these gadgets and gizmos mainly replaced work previously conducted by men, children, and servants. Instead of living lives of leisure, middle-class women found themselves struggling to keep up with ever higher standards of cleanliness.
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A Century of Buying, Driving, and Fixing Cars

Author: Katherine J. Parkin

Publisher: University of Pennsylvania Press

ISBN: 0812249534

Category: History

Page: 272

View: 5535

Women at the Wheel shows how stereotypes of women as uninterested in automobiles and, more perniciously, as poor drivers, has little basis in historical reality. However, Katherine J. Parkin argues that in American culture women are still considered imposters when they are at the wheel.
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Social Meanings of a New Technology, 1880-1940

Author: David E. Nye

Publisher: Mit Press

ISBN: 9780262640305

Category: History

Page: 479

View: 5172

Explores how electricity seeped into and redefined American culture, becoming fundamental to modern life.
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Author: E. A. Wrigley

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1107135710

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 240

View: 2316

Charts Britain's transformation from the European periphery to a global economic power from the reign of Elizabeth I to Victoria.
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Middle-class Women & Domestic Material Culture, 1840-1940

Author: Marilyn Ferris Motz,Pat Browne

Publisher: Popular Press

ISBN: 9780879724344

Category: Family & Relationships

Page: 212

View: 4792

The transformation of a house into a home has been in our culture a traditional task of women. The articles examine this process as they reflected the role of American middle-class women as homemakers in the years 1840–1940.
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Author: William W. Braham,Jonathan A. Hale

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1134279345

Category: Architecture

Page: 488

View: 2496

This essential reference for all students of architecture, design and the built environment provides a convenient single source for all the key texts in the recent literature on architecture and technology. The book contains over fifty carefully selected essays, manifestoes, reflections and theories by architects and architectural writers from 1900 to 2004. This mapping out of a century of architectural technology reveals the discipline's long and close attention to the experience and effects of new technologies, and provides a broad picture of the shift from the 'age of tools' to the 'age of systems'. Chronological arrangement and cross-referencing of the articles enable both a thematic and historically contextual understanding of the topic and highlight important thematic connections across time. With the ever increasing pace of technological change, this Reader presents a clear understanding of the context in which it has and does affect architecture.
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Technology and the Domestic Ideal in America

Author: Priscilla J. Brewer

Publisher: Syracuse University Press

ISBN: 9780815606505

Category: Cooking

Page: 338

View: 2370

"Extensively documented - based on letters, diaries, probate inventories, census records, sales figures, advertisements, fiction, and advice literature - the book will be valuable to scholars of American history and women's studies."--BOOK JACKET.
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The Rise and Fall of Domesticity in America

Author: Glenna Matthews

Publisher: Oxford University Press on Demand

ISBN: 0195059255

Category: History

Page: 281

View: 8614

Housewives constitute a large section of the population, yet they have received very little attention, let alone respect. Glenna Matthews, who herself spent many years as "just a housewife" before becoming a scholar of American history, sets out to redress this imbalance. While the male world of work has always received the most respect, Matthews maintains that widespread reverence for the home prevailed in the nineteenth century. The early stages of industrialization made possible a strong tradition of cooking, baking, and sewing that gave women great satisfaction and a place in the world. Viewed as the center of republican virtue, the home also played an important religious role. Examining novels, letters, popular magazines, and cookbooks, Matthews seeks to depict what women had and what they have lost in modern times. She argues that the culture of professionalism in the late nineteenth century and the culture of consumption that came to fruition in the 1920s combined to kill off the "cult of domesticity." This important, challenging book sheds new light on a central aspect of human experience: the essential task of providing a society's nurture and daily maintenance.
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Author: Mary Romero

Publisher: Psychology Press

ISBN: 9780415935418

Category: Social Science

Page: 242

View: 8402

When it was first published,Maid in the USAwas one of the first books to show the struggles of female and immigrant domestic workers in the United States. The book quickly became a landmark in the field as a startling original and critical overview of domestic workers that combined a race, class, and gender analysis. Both critically and popularly praised, Mary Romero's work brilliantly brings to light the complexity of the lives of domestic workers, most notably explaining the rise of Latinas and other women of color into the ranks of domestic cleaners and maids. Through startling interviews with Latina private household workers, Romero provides a unique window into their working conditions, their relationships with their (mostly female and white) employers, and their personal lives. Romero also tells of her own experiences as a young woman working as a domestic alongside her mother and other members of her family. The exciting 10th anniversary edition of this classic work includes a newintroduction by Romero that updates the state of domestic work and provides an overview of the "Nannygate" scandals in the recent past. There is also a new afterward from legendary scholar Dorothy E. Smith discussing the importance of this book for the field.
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Global Women's Issues and Knowledge

Author: Cheris Kramarae,Dale Spender

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1135963150

Category: Reference

Page: 2050

View: 3368

For a full list of entries and contributors, sample entries, and more, visit the Routledge International Encyclopedia of Women website. Featuring comprehensive global coverage of women's issues and concerns, from violence and sexuality to feminist theory, the Routledge International Encyclopedia of Women brings the field into the new millennium. In over 900 signed A-Z entries from US and Europe, Asia, the Americas, Oceania, and the Middle East, the women who pioneered the field from its inception collaborate with the new scholars who are shaping the future of women's studies to create the new standard work for anyone who needs information on women-related subjects.
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Author: Nigel Whiteley

Publisher: Reaktion Books

ISBN: 9780948462658

Category: Art

Page: 194

View: 6544

Although design has become eminently newsworthy among the general public in our society, there is very little understanding to be found of the values and implications that underlie it. Design generates much heat but little light: we live in a world that has much design consciousness, but little design awareness. Nigel Whiteley analyses design's role and status today, and discusses what our obsession with it tells us about our own culture. Design for Society is not an anti-design book; rather, it is an anti-consumerist-design book, in that it reveals what most people would agree are the socially and ecologically unsound values and unsatisfactory implications on which the system of consumerist design is constructed. In so doing, it prepares the ground for a more responsible and just type of design.
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Author: Frank Trentmann

Publisher: Oxford University Press on Demand

ISBN: 0199561214

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 695

View: 8004

The Oxford Handbook of the History of Consumption offers a timely overview of how our understanding of consumption in history has changed in the last generation.
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How Consumer Culture Took Root in the Rural Midwest

Author: David Blanke

Publisher: Ohio University Press

ISBN: 0821413473

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 282

View: 8500

From 1840 to 1900, midwestern Americans experienced firsthand the profound economic, cultural, and structural changes that transformed the nation from a premodern, agrarian state to one that was urban, industrial, and economically interdependent. Midwestern commercial farmers found themselves at the heart of these changes. Their actions and reactions led to the formation of a distinctive and particularly democratic consumer ethos, which is still being played out today. By focusing on the consumer behavior of midwestern farmers, Sowing the American Dream provides illustrative examples of how Americans came to terms with the economic and ideological changes that swirled around them. From the formation of the Grange to the advent of mail-order catalogs, the buying patterns of rural midwesterners set the stage for the coming century. Carefully documenting the rise and fall of the powerful purchasing cooperatives, David Blanke explains the shifting trends in collective consumerism, which ultimately resulted in a significant change in the way that midwestern consumers pursued their own regional identity, community, and independence.
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Technology and Republican Values in America, 1776-1900

Author: John F. Kasson

Publisher: Macmillan

ISBN: 9780809016204

Category: History

Page: 274

View: 2208

A major theme in American history has been the desire to achieve a genuinely republican way of life that values liberty, order, and virtue. This work shows us how new technologies affected this drive for a republican civilization - a question as vital now as ever.
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An Archaeology of the Early American Industrial Era

Author: Paul A. Shackel

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN: 1475799039

Category: Social Science

Page: 217

View: 1306

Harpers Ferry was one of America's earliest and most significant industrial communities - serving as an excellent example of the changing patterns of human relations that led to dramatic progress in work life and in domestic relations in modern times. In this well-illustrated book, Paul A. Shackel investigates the historical archaeology of Harpers Ferry, revealing the culture change and influence of new technology on workers and their families. He focuses on the contributions of laborers, craftsmen, and other subordinate groups to industrial progress, and examines ethnic and interracial development in an economy that was transformed from craft-based to industrial.
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Author: Louis P. Masur

Publisher: JHU Press

ISBN: 9780801862229

Category: History

Page: 331

View: 5144

In The Challenge of American History, Louis Masur brings together a sampling of recent scholarship to determine the key issues preoccupying historians of American history and to contemplate the discipline's direction for the future. The fifteen summary essays included in this volume allow professional historians, history teachers, and students to grasp in a convenient and accessible form what historians have been writing about.
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Aviation and Popular Culture

Author: A. Bowdoin Van Riper

Publisher: Texas A&M University Press

ISBN: 9781585443000

Category: Transportation

Page: 206

View: 4013

Imagining Flight is a history of the air age as the rest of us have experienced it: on the pages of books, the screens of movie theaters, and the front pages of newspapers. It focuses on the United States, but also contrasts American ideas and attitudes with those of other air-minded nations, including Britain, France, Germany and Japan.
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Author: Patricia D’Antonio, RN, PhD, FAAN,Ellen D. Baer, RN, PhD, FAAN,Sylvia Rinker, RN, PhD,Joan E. Lynaugh, RN, PhD, FAAN

Publisher: Springer Publishing Company

ISBN: 9780826116321

Category: Medical

Page: 400

View: 8269

Named an Outstanding Academic Title for 2001 by Choice! "Why turn to the past when attempting to build nursing's future?...To make good decisions in planning nursing's future in the context of our complex health care system, nurses must know the history of the actions being considered, the identities and points of view of the major players, and all the stakes that are at risk. These are the lessons of history." -- from the Introduction This book presents nursing history in the context of problems and issues that persist to this day. Issues such as professional autonomy, working conditions, relationships with other health professionals, appropriate knowledge for education and licensure, gender, class, and race are traced through the stories told in this volume. Each chapter provides a piece of the puzzle that is nursing. The editors, all noted nurse historians and educators, have carefully made selections from the best that has been published in the nursing and health care literature.
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Author: David B. Clarke,Marcus A. Doel,Kate M. L. Housiaux

Publisher: Psychology Press

ISBN: 9780415213776

Category: Science

Page: 288

View: 9668

This reader offers an essential selection of the best work on the Consumer Society. It brings together in an engaging, surprising, and thought provoking way, a diverse range of topics and theoretical perspectives.
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The American Left, the Cold War, and Modern Feminism

Author: Daniel Horowitz

Publisher: Univ of Massachusetts Press

ISBN: 9781558492769

Category: Political Science

Page: 354

View: 4164

This biography of Betty Friedan traces the development of her feminist outlook from her childhood in Illinois to her marriage. Horowitz offers a reading of The Feminine Mystique and argues that the roots of Friedan's feminism run deeper than she has led us to believe.
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